The Prodent Group Discusses How Oral Hygiene Affects the Health and Body

The Prodent Group Discusses How Oral Hygiene Affects the Health and Body
Researchers claim that good oral hygiene might be fruitful in warding off certain serious bodily complications such as stroke, heart attack, diabetes and many others. Thus maintaining a good oral hygiene isn't a choice, it is a necessity. By now, it is
Read more on Digital Journal

Study: Poor Oral Hygiene Habits May Increase Hypertension Risk
CHICAGO, IL–(Marketwired – July 28, 2015) – In a recent study, Korean researchers have found that poor oral hygiene habits may lead to increased incidence of hypertension. The study, published in the July 2015 issue of the Journal of Periodontology, …
Read more on Digital Journal

Free oral care given during MOM Program in Wise
The VDAF MOM Dental Clinic in Wise, in partnership with the VDA and the VCU Schools of Dentistry and Dental Hygiene, was the first effort of its kind for the organization, which began adding free clinics across the state. There have been 83 MOMs from
Read more on WSLS

Posted in Pet Care Media | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Before and After – Part 1

I sat down and had a portfolio review done the other day by a local photographer.  It’s hard to find someone that can give you honest (and knowledgable reviews).  I’m hoping to get a more in-depth one done with a well known pet photographer soon but I couldn’t seem to find the time to wrap my head around all the information I needed to provide to make it worthwhile and it was easier to just gather 30 photos together and get some quick and dirty feedback.

It was good. I learned a lot – mainly about what I should be doing better in editing but a little bit about what I could be doing differently while shooting too. Going into this process, I didn’t feel like I needed to agree with every comment he said, but for the most part, I found I understood his point and agreed with him.

I thought I would re-edit the images based on the review and then post some before and afters. Mainly so I can remember and refer back to it, but also in case some of you want to learn from my mistakes.  :)

I tended to make the same “errors” over and over again.  The biggest one is putting my subject in the centre of the frame.  There are times when it’s the best option, but often it isn’t.  I know this.  I’ve heard this before, yet I can’t seem to stop myself.   I don’t tend to centre my subject in the middle of the entire picture – but often they are in the middle from side to side or from top to bottom.

In this situation I took quite a few pictures of her under the tree so I just chose one with a crop I could work better with to include the feedback – which was essentially to put her on the right edge and to include more of the tree on the left.

Another common criticism (although I didn’t specifically write it down for this one) was to darken the background elements and increase my contrast so I did that too.

Before:

After:

Crazy Coulee and Little Lacey

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Kids in need get special treat

Kids in need get special treat
66. MARY: NOW A STORY THAT'S POSITIVELY JAX. EVERY DAY AS CHILDREN BATTLE LIFE-THREATENING ILLNESSES, THERE ARE LOCAL GROUPS WORKING HARD TO GIVE THESE KIDS A BIT OF BREAK FROM THEIR WORRIES. TONIGHT …
Read more on WJXT Jacksonville

How Republicans Treat Cleveland in Tonight's Debate Will Speak Volumes
Cleveland, where Fox News will host Thursday's Republican primary debate, is a city used to being ignored until someone finds it useful. Too often, this is as the punch line of a stale joke about our river that caught fire, our temperamental weather
Read more on The New Republic

Smartphone App Could Diagnose And Treat Mental Health Symptoms
BOSTON (CBS) – Whether someone is suffering from depression, anxiety, eating disorders, or substance abuse, doctors have to rely on a patient's memory to make a diagnosis and gauge whether therapy is working, but experts say it's hard for people to …
Read more on CBS Local

Posted in Pet Care Media | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Hi.

I actually didn’t have a post scheduled for today, but I decided to pop in and just say hi. I don’t do many personal posts around here, and these days most of my personal photos and updates end up on my Instagram. But I feel like the occasional check-in just to say hey is kind of important.

This summer has been bittersweet. It’s been filled with travels big and small, exciting plans (baby on the way, beginning house hunting, etc.), and a lot of fun sun-drenched hang sessions with Robbie and Essley at the pool and the park (my favorite). It has also brought something very rough and scary for my family (annoyingly vague I know, but that’s just how it needs to be for now, although good vibes and thoughts are certainly appreciated). It’s funny though how the bad can have positive effects as well, and can genuinely bring people closer together and allow for newfound appreciations for the beauty and magic of everyday life.

As always, I’ll be hanging onto the last weeks of summer with my fingertips. I love this time of year so much, and I’m grateful that it’s not quite over.

How is your summer going? What’s new in your life?

(Photo above from an upcoming outfit post. Yep, an outfit post. It’s been a while. And this one actually contains two sets of outfits. Oh the madness. Check back for the full post next week.)

ALSO FIND US HERE: BLOGLOVIN’ // INSTAGRAM // FACEBOOK // TWITTER // PINTEREST


Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Leave a comment

Pet Food Recall: Instinct® Raw Chicken Formula for dogs with a “Best By” date of 04/27/16

The official statement is from Nature’s Variety.

Nature’s Variety has announced a voluntary recall of their Instinct® Raw Chicken Formula for dogs with a “Best By” date of 04/27/16 because these products may be contaminated with Salmonella. Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.


Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.


Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has the symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.


The affected products are limited to the Instinct Raw Chicken Formula Frozen Diets packaged in the following forms:

  • UPC# 769949611431 – Instinct Raw Chicken Formula Bites for Dogs 4 lb.; Best By 04/27/16
  • UPC# 769949611448 – Instinct Raw Chicken Formula Bites for Dogs 7 lb.; Best By 04/27/16
  • UPC# 769949611486 – Instinct Raw Chicken Formula Patties for Dogs 6 lb.; Best By 04/27/16

The “Best By” date is located on the back of the package below the seal. The affected product was distributed through retail stores in the United States and limited distribution in Canada. No other Nature’s Variety products are affected.


No illnesses have been reported to date. Even though no illnesses have been reported, consumers should follow the Simple Handling Tips published on the Nature’s Variety package when disposing of the affected product.

Nature’s Variety became aware of a potential issue after receiving notification from the FDA that a routine surveillance sample of seven pound Instinct Raw Chicken Bites for dogs tested positive for Salmonella.


Consumers feeding the affected product should discontinue use and monitor their pet’s health, and contact their veterinarian if they have concerns. Consumers who have purchased one of the above products can obtain a full refund or exchange by either returning the product in its original packaging or bringing a proof of purchase back to their retailer.


Consumers with additional questions can call our Consumer Relations team at 888-519-7387 from 8 am to 7 pm Central time, 7 days a week during the recall. Or, consumers can email Nature’s Variety directly viacservice@naturesvariety.com.

 


PetsitUSA Blog

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Save tons at the vet! How to keep your dog from dying of cancer

As a veterinarian, I’ve seen lots of cancers: lymphoma. Melanoma. Osteosarcoma. Hemangiosarcoma. Mast cell tumors. Wait, those are just my own dogs I’m talking about. When I factor in my clients, I think I’ve seen it all.

Dogs get cancer, at very high rates: about 50% of senior dogs die of it, if the statistics are to be believed. Why? Well, if you read overly simplified, graphics-intensive websites by people who really don’t know what they’re talking about, they will tell you that they know why cancer happens: GMOs. Preservatives. Kibble. Microwaves.

I wish it were that simple. It’s not. And the reason that line of thought drives me nuts is that it has sent so many lovely people into spirals of depression when their dog dies and someone on the internet convinced them it was their fault because they, the owner, did something terrible like feed their dog kibble or use a plastic bowl. People end up in therapy because of things like this.

Cancer is not a singular diagnosis; the type and breath of neoplastic disease means there’s often little resemblance from case to case; a transmissible venereal tumor bears very little resemblance to a splenic hemangiosarcoma. If we could pinpoint cancer to one cause, we’d all be rich. And yet, with all this secret knowledge, overall cancer rates aren’t budging.

Because I love a breed known for having one of the highest rates of cancer (is it the fact that Golden Retriever owners feed worse food overall? Or is it genetics?) I watch Brody pretty closely. Knowing that 60% of Goldens get cancer in their lifetime, I spend a lot of time inspecting him for lumps. As we speak, the largest observational study of its kind is currently underway to help us better understand what’s going on. In the meantime, you do the best you can but truthfully, there’s not a whole lot of ability to predict and prevent cancer. Even for the people who home cook organic food (sorry. Do it because you want to, not because it will make your dog live forever.)

You can save money (and life expectancy) by doing some simple things:

Knowing he is an at-risk breed, I do what I can to try and keep Brody healthy. When he gained too much weight on his food, I got the weight off. Obesity is thought to be a risk factor for cancer. Just as importantly, I get his bumps evaluated and when I find one, I don’t mess around.

SEE SOMETHING

The dog eats like a king; I give him the good stuff because I care about quality ingredients, though not enough to condemn people who can’t afford it. But even with his high end diets, at age 6, he’s on his second cancer. The first one, a melanoma, was excised two years ago and has yet to recur- because we caught it early. And now we have this: a little teeny ear lump.

I thought it was no big deal, but I got it evaluated anyway. See? We vets do it too. A lump is a lump is a lump. Until you get it microscopically evaluated, you just don’t know. I just got the call last week: it’s a mast cell tumor.

I’m thrilled we got this diagnosis

Am I thrilled Brody has a mast cell tumor? Of course not. They stink. Despite the fact that the visible mass is only half a centimeter, this type of tumor has tons of microscopic disease and is notorious for requiring huge surgical margins for a complete excision. For that little tiny tic-tac mass on his ear, he is very likely going to need to lose his entire pinna. (I’m getting a surgical consult this week.)

However, losing an ear is minor compared to where these things end up when people wait. You can lose an ear, but you can’t lose an entire head, for example. This is small beans compared to what lots of pets need to go through later in the game when masses grow. If we get a complete excision, this should be a closed case. And guess what? It’s so much cheaper than tons of radiation and chemo and massive surgeries. Win-win for the dog and your wallet. I’m not happy he has it, but I’m happy I know now, early.

Why wait? Aspirate that shizz!!

What one thing can you do to guarantee your pet won’t get cancer? There isn’t one.

What you can do is maximize their chances of survival and recovery: Don’t mess around. Dr. Sue Ettinger, veterinary oncologist and all-around brilliant person, has an initiative called Why Wait Aspirate that is as simple as can be: when a vet tells you that a lump is ok to “just watch”, what does that mean? When do you do more than watch it? Here’s Dr. Sue’s guidelines*:

If it's bigger than a pea

ASPIRATE OR BIOPSY IT!

Easy peasy, no pun intended. Of all the things you can do to help your pet live long and live healthy, none matters more than early detection.

*Photo Credits: Calendar by Michael Hyde, Flickr Creative Commons license; Peas by Isabel Eyre, Flickr Creative Commons License

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pawcurious: With Veterinarian and Author Dr. V

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Varsity Calvinball

Varsity Calvinball
One of our favorite tropes from Bill Watterson's brilliant comic strip Calvin and Hobbes was “Calvinball.” The eponymous 6-year-old boy invented the game because he didn't care for organized sports. The central feature of Calvinball is that the rules
Read more on Wall Street Journal

In Savannah: 24 Hours, 192 Horn Blasts
Every day, as up to eight freight trains pass back and forth on the outskirts of historical downtown Savannah, Ga., they blow their horns at every single one of the 24 rail crossings along the three-mile stretch. That is making the Genesee & Wyoming
Read more on Wall Street Journal

Woolly Thinking
Another talked about how to make chickens that laid duck eggs. I buttonholed scientists in hallways to interrogate them about their research—how they were extracting DNA from stuffed passenger pigeons or searching for the frozen flesh of woolly
Read more on Wall Street Journal

Posted in Pet Care Media | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Anything: The Prayer That Unlocked My God and My Soul by Jennie Allen {Book Review}

Anything: The Prayer That Unlocked My God and My Soul by Jennie Allen My rating: 5 of 5 stars When “Anything” was first released, I quickly bought it. By the time I was finished with this book, every chapter was dog-earred, highlighted, underlined, notes on the side, spine was well bent and I was pretty…



[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]


Sunflower Faith

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

El Paso Chihuahuas unveil fashion statement

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Saturday Survey: National Mutt Day

Although I didn’t announce it in advance, yesterday was National Mutt Day! Did you honor the day in any way? Until next time, Good day, and good dog!


Doggies.com Dog Blog

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment