Halloween Treat! Dracula Resurrects Monster Mash

In this Halloween treat, DARA fuses stop motion animation and choreographed dance. The music video that they concoct scares up the story of the devilish dance party where The Monster Mash was…

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Apr 23, Tapioca in Dog Food | Best Dog Food Guide

Tapioca in dog food as novel starch source to use in elimination diets, to eliminate allergy symptoms, and no grain diets.
Dog Food Blog | Best Dog Food Guide

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THE CAT HOUSE ON THE KINGS

firstAt one of the nation’s largest cat rescues, the Cat House on the Kings, more than 700 cats live peacefully on 12-acres of beautiful, safe land in Parlier, Calif.

This cage-free, no-kill, lifetime sanctuary was founded in 1992 and has saved more than 24,000 cats and 7,000 dogs, plus spayed or neutered another 40,000.

Freekibble.com and Halo are proud to make regular, bi-monthly donations to The Cat House on the Kings to help support their rescue efforts.

Click here to read the complete story.

Halo

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Tartar de Salmón y Aguacate – Recetas para Navidad

En esta vídeo receta vamos a ver cómo hacer un tartar de salmón con aguacate. Una receta muy sana, fácil y rápida de preparar perfecta para esta Navidad. Esp…
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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Canine Distemper


For many years canine distemper was one of the most deadly viral diseases affecting dogs. Since the introduction of a vaccine to combat the disease, the incidence of distemper infections has dropped considerably.

Good vaccination practices in the U.S. have played a major role in the reduction of distemper cases in this country, but unfortunately, canine distemper is still a huge problem in other parts of the world.

The canine distemper virus is an RNA virus. A variation of the canine distemper virus causes measles in humans.

Canine distemper can affect dogs of any age but is more likely to affect younger puppies rather than older dogs. This may be due to an acquired immunity resulting from a canine distemper vaccination, or to exposure to the virus, resulting in the dog developing an immunity to the virus.

The wide range of clinical signs accompanying an infection of distemper often makes it very difficult to diagnose a young dog with distemper. In some dogs, a temporary fever and a lack of appetite, sudden lethargy or mild depression, are often the only signs of the onset of distemper. Some dogs infected with the distemper virus may have discharges from the nose and eyes in addition to coughing, a fever, lack of an appetite, vomiting and diarrhea. It is not uncommon for an infected dog to display some but not all of the symptoms associated with canine distemper.

Distemper infections often go undiagnosed when an owner believes the dog just has a cold or some other non-life threatening illness. The unfortunate consequence of misdiagnosing a dog’s distemper symptoms could result in the death of the dog.

Some dogs are able to survive the initial viral infection but later develop neurologic signs in one to two weeks after becoming infected. These signs include seizures, sudden and strange changes in behavior, and constantly walking in circles. Many dogs who develop neurologic signs develop rhythmic motions or twitches. Sometimes an affected dog will act as if it’s chewing on something due to continuous contractions of the head muscles. If a dog is able to survive the initial viral infection and does not display any neurologic damage, it does not mean the dog is completely in the clear. A distemper infection can also lead to retinal damage and discoloration of the dog’s cornea. Sometimes, the dog’s skin, nose and foot pads will become very hard.

There is a period of time that the virus remains dormant after a dog is infected. The clinical signs of distemper will begin to show approximately 10 to 14 days after infection. If a puppy is vaccinated against distemper but has already been infected with the virus, the vaccination will not be effective in preventing the disease.

Currently there is no specialized treatment that can kill the distemper virus. Prevention of infection is the best way to guard your puppy or dog against canine distemper. Be sure your new puppy is vaccinated at approximately 6 weeks of age. The vaccinations will need to be continued until the puppy reaches 12 to 16 weeks of age. The distemper vaccinations are given in 3 to 4 week intervals. Injection of the vaccine has to be repeated due to interference with the vaccine from antibodies in the mother’s milk being passed on to the puppies. These antibodies prevent the vaccine from being effective in about 75% of all puppies vaccinated at six weeks of age, approximately 25% of puppies vaccinated at nine weeks of age, and only a small number of puppies vaccinated at twelve weeks of age.

The follow-up vaccinations provide protection to almost all puppies who receive the vaccine.

Canine distemper virus is found in all the body secretions from an infected animal. Raccoons and skunks are often carriers of this deadly disease, so it’s a good idea to watch your dog carefully when venturing into areas where these animals are often found. Living in the city does not automatically exclude the possibility of an infected raccoon or skunk because these animals love to raid neighborhood garbage cans when foraging for food.

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German Shepherd Loves Big Brother

German Shepherd Wudan loves her big brother so much that she still thinks she is small enough to sleep on his back…

The post German Shepherd Loves Big Brother appeared first on A Place to Love Dogs.

A Place to Love Dogs

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Creepy Zone (CZ): ¡EL ATAQUE DE SMILE DOG!

jamas hubiera esperado encontrarmele en un juego de terror… pero me alegro de haberlo hecho, siempre me cayo mejor que Slenderman.
Video Rating: 4 / 5

HD Makeup Tutorial for Smile.Dog from Creepy Pasta! •I make and sell my bald caps on my website! :) http://charlie-short.com/shop_caps.html —————–…

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Apr 23, Dog Food News | Best Dog Food Guide

Dog Food News gives you the latest information and trends in dog food and much more. Stay tuned and subscribe to the RSS feed as there is just so much going on.
Dog Food Blog | Best Dog Food Guide

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Kennel Cough in Dogs


Kennel cough in dogs is a fairly easy ailment to diagnose at home. If your dog suddenly develops a ‘hacking’ cough or constantly sounds like it’s choking on something, it could be kennel cough, known to your vet as canine infectious tracheobronchitis.

These coughing sounds can be frightening, leading you to believe something is seriously wrong with your dog; but most of the time kennel cough is not a serious condition and dogs usually recover from it without needing to undergo any treatment.

Dogs develop kennel cough if they inhale bacteria or virus particles into their respiratory tract. A dog’s respiratory tract is lined with a coating of mucus to trap infectious particles. However, there are some conditions that can weaken a dog’s natural protection mechanism and make it susceptible to kennel cough infection, and the result is an inflammation of the larynx (voice box) and trachea (windpipe).

Several conditions that can lead to kennel cough in dogs include exposure to poorly ventilated or overcrowded rooms and holding areas in kennels and animal shelters; overexposure to cold temperatures; and repeated exposure to dust or smoke from cigarettes.

Kennel cough can have multiple causes and is by no means limited specifically to the conditions listed above. One of the most common reasons for a dog to develop a case of kennel cough is a bacteria called Bordetella bronchiseptica. Most dogs that are infected with this bacteria will also become infected with a virus at the same time. Canine adenovirus, canine herpes virus, canine distemper virus, and parainfluenza virus are among these diseases, and they are more serious than kennel cough alone.

If your dog continues to have a persistent, forceful cough, listen carefully to determine if it sounds very different from the cough-like sound made by many dogs which is referred to as a “reverse sneeze.” Reverse sneezes are normal in certain dogs and breeds, and is usually caused by post-nasal drip or a slight irritation in the dog’s throat. If your dog displays other symptoms including sneezing, a runny nose, or eye discharge, you’ll probably want to have your vet check the dog to be sure the symptoms are not indicative of kennel cough or one of the viruses.

Kennel cough in dogs is a very contagious disease and a dog who has come down with it should not be allowed around other healthy dogs.

Most cases of kennel cough will resolve themselves without any kind of treatment, but medications can help speed the dog’s recovery and help minimize symptoms during the infection. Most dogs will recover completely within three weeks, but older dogs or dogs with certain medical conditions can take up to six weeks to fully recover.

A serious case of kennel cough in dogs can lead to pneumonia so it’s wise to follow up with your vet if your dog doesn’t improve within this short period of time. Also, if your dog begins breathing rapidly or acts listless it could be signs of a more serious condition

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