NJ Vet, Dr. Lisa Aumiller, is 1 of 20 nominees for America’s Favorite Vet through the American Veterinary Medical Association, AVMA…

Dr. Lisa Aumiller of HousePaws Mobile Veterinary Service 

in Mt.  afv blogLaurel, NJ, has been nominated for America’s Favorite Vet.  She’s the only vet from New Jersey, and I’m hoping to help her bring the title home!

The winner becomes the spokesperson on behalf of the American Veterinary Medical Foundation, AVMF, which is the charitable arm of the American Veterinary Medical Association, AVMA. This is not a paid position!  And there is not a vet I know more qualified and dedicated, and would wholeheartedly represent the betterment of care for animals, promote advocacy, and inspire fundraising more than Dr. Lisa Aumiller!

She is a mobile vet and is known for visiting sick pets past 11 pm, starting her schedule earlier than planned, and arriving in the worst snowstorms to make sure her patients are seen. Additionally, Dr. Lisa has two hospital facilities if parents prefer to bring their pets for traditional vet visits.

Her practice focuses on integrative care and wellness, and with the latest technology, she is able to perform cold laser therapy, acupuncture, x-rays, ultrasound, and the like, for pets in the comfort of their own homes!

Dr. Lisa personally speaks to parents, texts and emails them, yes, personally, from her cell phone if need be!  Do your pet parents have their vet’s cell phone number?  Do you?  I do… that’s right!  When she is the veterinarian of a furry baby in my care, I can reach out to her anytime.  What vet does this??? Dr. Lisa Aumiller of HousePaws Mobile Vet does  : ) 

She is also most charitable and benevolent with providing medical care to animals, working with over 40 rescues, and is so extremely giving of her time with outreach, raising awareness about wellness and nutrition, holding complimentary educational seminars for pet parents, pet sitters and professionals, free dental screenings and wellness events for pets in the community, and workshops for children.  She held a Martin Luther King, Jr. community service project bringing everyone together to bake healthy treats for homeless animals and a workshop making environmentally-friendly toys to donate to animals in shelters, and continuously sponsors similar events.  She brings live animals and education to children at schools, teaching respect and proper care of animals, provides extensive, complimentary medical care for animals in a makeover project for homeless dogs in a collaborative effort with groomers to facilitate adoptions, and does microchipping for donations, while the community chooses a different nonprofit charity to receive the donations each month.  And for years, Dr. Lisa has been writing an informative column for the county newspaper and answering parents’ questions.

Dr. Lisa’s positive and upbeat personality inspires the community to volunteer; families come together for fun days, pets are welcome and spend quality time with their parents, and everyone enjoys fundraising endeavors!  She’s currently sponsoring events to bring the first local dog park to Riverton, NJ, and strongly encourages pet-friendly social activities by hosting doggie dips for furry babies to enjoy a swim, Yappy Hours sipping Puptinis, and Pup and Me Yoga!

With her down-to-earth personality and philosophy of teamwork, you get to engage with Dr. Lisa and the incredibly friendly staff at HousePaws at the various events, not only when your pet is ill, so you connect on a personal level, feel much more comfortable and truly cared about in time of need!

Year round Dr. Lisa and HousePaws Mobile Veterinary Service raise a tremendous amount of money for The Boo Tiki Fund, a non-profit charity where parents may apply for a grant for veterinary care to avoid having to put their beloved pet to sleep, to end suffering by improving their quality of life, even preventing a pet being relinquished to a shelter because a family cannot afford medical care.  And that’s even just a portion of what I’m aware!

My personal experience with Dr. Lisa Aumiller is that she never says no!!!  Her practice has been the main sponsor for South Jersey’s Annual Pet Wellness Symposium I organize and host, and she immediately said yes when asked if she was interested in becoming the certified vet for trainings when a Fido Bag is donated, another voluntary position!  For the past few years, Dr. Lisa has been providing first responders the necessary training to utilize pet-specific oxygen masks and Animal CPR / first aid so animals now have a chance to survive a fire or disaster.  I’ve also brought her animals from the street when other vets recommended euthanasia and she provided life-saving surgery, knowing I hadn’t even begun to raise donations yet.  Another animal I literally took from a cage at another vet’s office who they scheduled to be euthanized!  Dr. Lisa allowed him to live at her hospital until I found a home.  And who do you think took care of him on the weekends and evenings when the staff were off?  That’s right, Dr. Lisa Aumiller herself!  I’ve emailed, texted, called Dr. Lisa countless occasions regarding my personal pet as well as pets in my care in the evening, weekends, holidays, and she always took the time to answer my questions and ensure the pets received appropriate care.

I thank her every opportunity I get for always taking the time to help because not only did it benefit the animals in my care, but Dr. Lisa helped me to become a more educated and skilled pet sitter!

Too good to be true, right?  That’s what I thought when I first met her… But it continued and just gets better and better; hence, her earning the title of a “Veterinary Angel” with me as well as so many others!

Although you may not live in New Jersey, I highly recommend you vote for Dr. Lisa as there is no doubt she will inspire other  vets and set a precedence that being a veterinarian doesn’t stop at treating animals… it’s just the beginning!  Animals desperately need Dr. Lisa Aumiller’s voice as the AVMF’s spokesperson; she needs your vote to make it happen.  Again this is not a paid position, rather, an extension of a vet’s dedication to outreach and education!
HousePawsFinalJan2014
      Click here for the ballot to vote…  vote for Dr. Lisa Aumiller.   You may vote daily until Tuesday, Sept. 1st.  Animals need Dr. Lisa and HousePaws Mobile Vet… and she needs your votes to win!!!
        Learn more about America’s Favorite Vet
To visit HousePaws Facebook Page


PetsitUSA Blog

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Consumer Search Names Halo Spot’s Stew Best Canned Cat Food for 2016

Spot's Stew Wholesome Chicken Recipe for CatsWe’re thrilled that Consumer Search, once again, named Spot’s Stew Wholesome Chicken Recipe canned cat food the best canned cat food.

They gave it high marks for being grain-free, having high-quality ingredients and lacking artificial preservatives.

In their analysis, they like that, “Halo Spot’s Stew packs high-quality meats and veggies into a stew that looks like people food. The company has a spotless safety record and use no questionable ingredients or fillers. The cans are BPA free, too.”

Thank you Consumer Search for reviewing our product and for naming us one of the best cat foods for the second year in a row.

Halo

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The Curious Incident of the Levitating Chihuahua in the Day-Time

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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Emma and Joe

My beautiful friend, Emmanuelle, and her dog Joe.
RIVIERA DOGS

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Double Trouble

Two beauties …
RIVIERA DOGS

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Infographic: Moving with Pets

Moving is a stressful time–whether you have two or four legs. With so many details to manage, from coordinating arrangements with movers to finding and settling in a new home, it’s…



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DogTipper

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Asking For Positive Thoughts for Our Emmett

This is a post I never imagined I’d have to write. Some of you may have already seen my update on Instagram yesterday. For the rest of you, here it is.

On Tuesday morning of this week, Emmett’s 7 month birthday, he was diagnosed with a rare, serious form of Epilepsy. The only symptom was an occasional random head nod he’d had on and off for a few days that we decided to have checked out by his pediatrician, just to be safe. Long story short, after an immediate trip to a pediatric neurologist and an EEG, we were given a diagnosis, and spent the rest of the week in the pediatric unit of Northwestern/CDH hospital.

The prognosis for this specific type of epilepsy is very poor for the vast majority of the cases – but most of the tests we’ve had done, along with the facts that Emmett is developmentally where he should be for his age and we caught it very early, are positive signs. They have also found no cause for this with Emmett (which is actually a good thing with this specific disease). His time in utero and life up to this point have been perfectly healthy.

We are now giving him twice daily injections at home of a powerful medicine that, while not without extreme side effects, will hopefully help end his seizures soon and thus give him a chance. How he reacts to the medication over the next couple of days is crucial in determining what the outcome will be.

Whatever your beliefs, please channel good energy, pray, manifest, meditate, focus on healing vibes for our little boy. I believe in the power of positive collective energy – I have seen it work. The more people sending love and light his way, the more people praying, and the more people envisioning a positive outcome, the better I believe his chances are. We are so grateful for the support and love of our friends (internet friends included) and family right now. We feel lucky to know so many kind, compassionate people who care about our family and our son. I am terrified. This is hell. But I believe. Just like I had a strong maternal instinct that told me something was wrong when it looked like absolutely nothing, I have a strong instinct telling me that Emmett is going to pull through this and be one of the exceptions.

For right now, Bubby and Bean will remain silent of regular posts while we make sense of this. My number one priority right now is to focus on Emmett and his sister. I also ask you to forgive me for not being the best communicator right now, and not in the head space to answer questions or to be able to handle much more than just good vibes. I will update as I can.

Thank you in advance for sending any love you can our way. Emmett is a fighter, and I believe in him with all my heart.

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Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

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Ethiopian wolf hunting strategies

From the BBC’s The Hunt:

 


Natural History

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Shelter Saturday: August 13

As athletes from around the globe go for the gold in the 2016 Olympic Summer Games in Rio, homeless dogs in shelters across America are hoping to win the love of a forever pet parent with a heart of…



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DogTipper

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Meadow fox

gray fox in the meadow

 

The sun sets on a muggy July day in northern West Virginia. As darkness envelops the land, the stidulations of crickets and other buzzing insects replace the last of the birdsong. The last rays of the sun cast shadows on an old hayfield, leaving a hazy glow among the grass just now growing back green from the first cutting.

White-tailed deer wander into the hayfield with caution. Months before, the bullets flew through the air at them, and though those days are long way off, the deer do not forget the lesson of November. In the open, man and his bullets can drop the deer at many yards. In the forest, there is security, but sweet clover grows in the rowen. And for that repast, they  will risk exposure.

But they will not enter with out their noses and ears and eyes trained into the distance. Every once in a while, a deer jerks its head up and rotates its ears at some sound. It might only be the scurrying of a mouse or vole, but it might be a spotlighting deer poacher pushing the safety forward on his rifle.

It takes only one mistake, so each sound is taken seriously.

But as the darkness draws, the deer begin to relax a bit. The clover is good and fresh and cool.

As the deer graze the clover, a gray form materializes on the opposite side of they hayfield. It is cat-like in its movements, but it sniffs the ground with purpose, like a beagle tracking a cottontail through the edge of a brier patch.

It is the form of a little gray fox, a creature that lies somewhere between the foxes we all know so well and the primitive raccoon-like dogs from which all dogs descend. The gray fox’s kind first appeared during the Pliocene and evolved to live in humid forests much like the one that surrounds the hayfield on all sides.

During the day, the fox seeks the same shelter in the forest that the deer seek. For generations, the hunters have shot the foxes for their fur and to protect their stupid chickens, which foolishly roost in trees where a fox can easily climb up and catch them.

This fox is not a chicken poacher. She never even seen one. Her whole life’s work is the pursuit of the vole and the mouse and the dashing run at the cottontail. In the spring, she robbed a few turkey nests and climbed into the trees to rob the nests of robins and thrushes and warblers.

Tonight she has come to check out some vole trails that ravel along an old access road and end in a hedgerow of autumn olive where she came across a rabbit nest a few weeks earlier.

A fox in her second year should have a growing litter of kits to feed, but this fox’s litter all died when her mate was killed running across a road where he was certain there would be no traffic. With no mate to bring her fresh meat during the nesting season, her milk dried up and hunger forced her to abandon the den.

She has been a lone fox all these months and only now is she coming back into her fine form. Her summer pelt is thick and platinum silver trimmed in an elegant tawny red behind her ears and on her legs and under belly. Down her tail runs a strip of black hair, which she an raise as a hackle whenever she is enraged or nervous.

But there is none of that now. Her nose is quivering at the scent of meadow voles. One has just run down this little trial. The fox lifts her nose to see if she can catch its scent in the air.

A tiny bit of vole scent wafts into her right nostril. She turns to the right, cautiously stepping into stalk. The vole becomes nervous and scurries a bit.  The fox’s ears catch the sound, and she stops. She cocks her head to catch the sound a little more clearly. The vole scurries again, and, in its confusion moves, into a copse of grass just two yards from the fox.

The fox inches closer to the copse. The vole remains still. The fox cocks her head again. Her black nose quivers to catch the vole scent again. She knows that in that copse of orchard grass there is a nice fat vole, and now she must prepare to make her leap.

She digs into the ground, and one can almost hear her counting off before she bounds forward into the vole’s poorly-chosen refuge. Her jaws hit the grass with just precision that vole almost explodes into them as she draws down upon her quarry.

She raises her head from the grass as a squeaking vole screams out in its death throes in her mouth.

One vole down. One more bit of protein to hold over starvation.

The deer raise their heads and stamp and blow warning bark-wheezes at the sound. They know the sound of successful predation. In the spring, the coyotes and bears had lifted some their fawns in much the same manner, and the bawling fawns were unable to be saved as the forest monsters carried them off to their deaths.

A squeaking mouse unnerves them in much the same way.

The fox becomes unnerved by the agitated deer, but she soon dispatches the vole and chokes him down. All that noise might be attracting a deer, but they could just as a easily drawn in a coyote or another fox.

And she is more than content to have this hayfield to herself. Last week, she’d run out a young dog red fox who thought he could chase rabbits here all night long. She set the record straight with a few well-timed bites on the backside.

But this little gray fox is not the empress of the hayfield. At any moment, a coyote could show up and run her off. An enterprising predator hunter could take a few shots at her. Dogs could come running after her for nothing more than a good chase. A great horned owl could come sailing silently from the sky and carry her off.

Her life is harrowing yet perfect. Fields of voles and mice and rabbits will feed her well. Feral apples and pears will give her a little desert.

And though her kind must face danger in order to survive, there has been no time in the gray fox’s evolutionary history when times were so good. The death of the agrarian economy in West Virginia has meant more old fields and more reforestation. The gray fox is a creature of the forest, and when this land was heavily forested before, it was forced to share it with any number of larger predators, including cougars and wolves.

And with fur prices not being worth the trouble for all but the most devout predator hunter and trappers, there really aren’t that many people out to get her.

She may not be the empress, but in this moment is she is certainly regal. She is a predator that has just successfully caught her prey. The ancient call of predators to seek their prey has driven evolution in truly profound ways, yet its successful sequence is both brutal and spectacular. It’s not quite the same as watching a pride of lions take down a Cape buffalo.

But it is essence, it is the same thing.

With the vole now thoroughly swallowed, the fox stops to drink from the muddy ditch that runs alongside the access road. A northern green frog leaps out as the fox approaches. She offers to give chase but gives up as soon as the frog buries itself in the mud at the bottom of the ditch.

The fox drinks the water and then caster her nose into the wind. She quivers her nose  to catch the scent of any quarry or predators or competitors that might be nearby. Her nose registers nothing.

She trots down the access road then dives down into the treeline. She crosses an unnoticeable trail that goes through a patch of multiflora roase and then turns  to take it deep into the woods where dogs and man never go.

And thus the meadow fox leaves the hayfield and whatever drama she brought to it.

The deer continue their clover supper, and the crickets carry on with their night song.

 

 

 


Natural History

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