{Guest Article}Quiet Time – What’s That? By Elizabeth Marks

Quiet Time – What’s That? By Elizabeth Marks Genesis 18:1 KJV And the Lord appeared unto him in the plains of Mamre; and he sat in the tent door in the heat of day Abraham was sitting quietly in his tent door.  Perhaps he was  meditating or praying.  We don’t know for sure.  However, we do know to sit means to be fairly still and not moving around. Notice how the Lord appeared to Abraham when he was still?  How often are we still?   Do you allow stillness into your daily routine?  It is within this stillness you can  hear the Lord speaking to you….



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Sunflower Faith

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SF Treat #20

EMB, Pier 7, and Black Rock may be “gone” but San Francisco is still skateboard Mecca. This video feature by Colton Light is an awesome display of the shredd…
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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Pet Disaster Relief: How It Works (hint: don’t show up without calling first)

September is National Preparedness Month, according to FEMA. It’s easy to see why. A lot of bad things happen in Mother Nature this time of year; Colorado the latest in a long series of national disasters to catch the eye of the nation. Few images are as evocative as that of a stranded animal, confused, petrified, and facing an uncertain fate while we sit in front of the TV and wonder, is anyone going to help him? How does animal rescue work?

Colorado horse

Katrina

According to Kim Little, my Technical Animal Rescue trainer who taught me in Nicaragua last year, the craziest rescue he ever participated in was a massive pet pot bellied pig stranded in a flooded home during Hurricane Katrina. If you ever meet him someday, ask him about it. Kim’s a pro, active in professional rescue training for decades. The animal rescue component, however, is relatively new.

RescuedCatKatrinaMost anyone who has been active in animal rescue long enough will tell you Katrina was the game changer in disaster response, for many different reasons. It was a mess in general, as we all know, but the animal component was almost nil. People who refused to evacuate because they couldn’t take their pets later required rescue themselves, preferring to risk death than abandon their beloved companion.

A person I met last weekend at my SEMS/ICS disaster response training spoke of a story from Katrina, a little girl who had evacuated with her cat. The cat was with her, safe, and she was told by the bus driver that would take them to safety that pets were not allowed. They must put the carrier down and leave the cat, no, there was nowhere for it to go, and they needed to leave, now. He said he was haunted by the sound of her screams as her bus pulled away, leaving the cat alone in the parking lot as he scrambled to find help.

That was in 2005, and it was awful. In 2006, President Bush signed the Pets Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act into law. In a really oversimplified statement, it officially makes pets part of the national disaster response framework. In order for this to really function the way it was intended, though, there needs to be a plan at the local, county, and state levels for pets as well.

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Emergency response trickles up. The National Guard is not called in for a small brush fire in San Diego. However, once that fire spreads beyond what the local fireman can handle, they request aid from the county, then on up to the state, then eventually in huge disasters, a federal level. In order to maintain order and safety in chaos, the manner in which these disasters are managed is consistent across the board: the Incident Command System. ICS provides a standardized response framework that functions the exact same way regardless of whether you’re dealing with a car accident on your street, or a 8.5 earthquake.

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It’s absolutely essential; communications breakdown in a rapidly changing situation can mean disaster. Because the system is standardized and the chain of command well defined, you can drop a fireman from Phoenix into Yosemite and he will know exactly what to do.

But is it the same for animal rescuers?

Pet Disaster Aid: The Government Part

As a vet, I can’t just show up to the flood line and ask if there’s a sick pet I can help. I would probably get myself killed standing around where the helicopter is supposed to land or something. This is why ICS is important, and why emergency management teams ask those who have not been trained not to “self deploy” in emergency situations. I’m minimally trained in disasters; my knowledge is pretty specific to pets. I tried to learn water rescue once; in the practice scenario, I killed myself and the victim I was supposed to be helping. My job became “stay on shore and make sure we have enough rope”, which is also essential and as it turns out something I was great at. To truly be helpful in these situations you need two things: a skill that is useful; knowledge of the command structure and who is going to be in charge of you.

Some of us were better at water rescue than others.

Some of us were better at water rescue than others.

During Hurricane Katrina, there was no one in the official government rescue effort tasked with helping animals. ASPCA and HSUS sent in large scale, well trained relief volunteers, and thank goodness they did because no one else was doing it. But without being part of the official effort, there’s no reimbursement from the government, and more importantly no official way to communicate with the other disaster responders on the ground who may have important information: for example, a person shows up at the Red Cross shelter with a dog; would they even know if/where the emergency shelter is? A fireman doing a swift water rescue on a person realizes the victim is with a horse; who do they call?

With PETS signed into law, states are now working to come up with a clear and well defined animal response plan that integrates into the other structures already in place. On a local level, that means working with animal control and local shelters to provide immediate sheltering and aid. As the situation escalates, larger groups come into play.

In my home state of California, the California Veterinary Medical Reserve Corps- of which I am a member- is the veterinary group that is mobilized on a state level- not until the governor declares a state of emergency. Colorado’s Veterinary Medical Reserve Corps functions similarly, and both are units of the National Medical Reserve Corps. Oversight groups such as PetAid Colorado and CARES in California are tasked with the bigger issue of figuring out how this all should also play out at the local level- all the people in charge before the governor gets involved. As well as pets, they are to come up with plans for all animals: livestock, zoos, farms…. you see how crazy this gets. MASSIVE task.

Private Disaster Aid: So Where is My Money Going?

So hang on, if there’s laws saying the government needs to plan to take care of animals, why are these other groups asking for money? Make no mistake, non-profits/NGOs still have a vital role to play here.

1. There are different type of disaster declarations and not every incident is eligible for state or federal aid. In smaller disasters, the first line of defense is the local community: your local SPCA, shelters, vets, and rescues. Their resources, as you know, are often strained. As a disaster gets larger in scope, their responsibilities only grow.

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Groups like American Humane Association provide invaluable support during disasters

2. An “official” government entity in charge may invite a nonprofit in to help. In Boulder, Animal Control was quickly overwhelmed at the flooding before them. They invited Code 3 Associates and American Humane Association’s Red Star rescue team, both exceptionally well trained animal rescue providers, in to help.

How Can I Help?

1. If you want to know who in Colorado needs help, BlogPaws- itself based in Colorado- has a great article listing local groups in action.

2. If you are a veterinary professional or someone with animal experience and you want to be on call for disasters, try searching “(name of your state) veterinary medical reserve corps”. The ASPCA also has an excellent list of disaster response training courses.

3. If you want to be better prepared for a disaster (and who doesn’t), check out this list of Animal Preparedness Tips from FEMA.

 

Pawcurious: With Pet Lifestyle Expert and Veterinarian Dr. V.

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Montana – Day 4

Today was another town day.  The clouds were very low and there was a chance of rain all day, although it never actually rained.  We went into Bozeman and toured around and had a much more productive day than when we toured around Livingston yesterday.

We went to a fun pet store, then a golf store (where I read a photography book in the car and actually picked up a tip on back button focusing that FINALLY convinced me why it would be better for me – gotta figure out how to set the camera up right first though.  I’m excited to play though.), then we went to REI (my first one ever!) where we bought a hiking book and map for the area.  Then we stopped in a Starbucks and poured over the book and map to find some hikes for when the weather improves.  We then went and toured West Paw Design.  So fun.  We popped in unannounced and they had no problem taking us around.  We saw stuffies, and beds and their hard plastic toys being made.  And we got to see Coulee’s picture on the wall.  They’d asked to buy it a few years ago as they were looking for images to decorate the office. It was huge – probably around 3×4′.  I’ve never printed anything so large so it was nice to know it still looks decent at that size.  We joked about bringing her in to sign her image but we left her in the car.  ;)

And now we are back “home”.  Marlin is preparing his fishing stuff and I’m wrestling with WiFi.  There is about a 1 ft square space on the kitchen table where we can get wifi about 25% of the time.  LOL.  Everywhere else you can only get it for about 1 minute at a time and then it takes 45 minutes to reconnect.

Sorry no photos today.  It wasn’t that kind of day!
Crazy Coulee and Little Lacey

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Disgusting: A Video Points to a Dog-Fighting Ring in S.F.

Cops busted a suspected dog ring in San Francisco, thanks to a cell phone video that one of the suspects had on his phone. After police arrested Ed Perkins on an unrelated charge last month, they discovered a video of a dog fight — with the faces of those involved visible, according to reporting by ABC 7

On the video, two Pit Bulls fight while their owners and a crowd cheer them on. 

“They’re kinda slapped and punched and yelled at and set back at each other and they fought pretty viciously for about five minutes until the video cuts off,” said Inspector Dan Silver, who is with the San Francisco Police Department’s gang task force.

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Police believe the fight happened in March at the Hunters View housing development. Three men have been arrested, according to ABC 7, all members of the Westmob gang: Perkins and Acie Lee Mathews Jr., both owners of the dogs, and Jermaine Jackson, who was a bystander, which is also a crime. 

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At Jackson's home, police found a Pit Bull mom, three puppies, a bulletproof vest, and ammunition.

"Westmob does robberies, murders; there've been rapes, burglaries, drug dealing," Silver said.

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Also on Perkins' cell phone: videos of Pit Bulls being trained to fight by attacking tires.

Silver told ABC 7 that dog fighting is a common tool for gangs to control their turf.

"It just creates an increasing air of violence and intimidation in the neighborhood," he said. "It's not all uncommon practice at all."

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San Francisco Police Inspector Dan Silver

Police have not found the dogs and are seeking the public's help in finding other people in the video. Their photos can be found here

If anyone has any information regarding the people in the video or the location of the dogs, contact the San Francisco Police Department tip line at 415-575-4444.


The Scoop | The Scoop

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Two More PetFleas Staff Members Pass Exams to Become SQPs


Tarporley, Cheshire (PRWEB UK) 29 August 2013

PetFleas is proud to make the announcement that two more members of their staff have passed their exams and have now become qualified SQPs. This company was one of the first ever websites that ever specialised in pet flea products and other general animal health products and they are fully dedicated to offering the best possible health advice and care to pet owners.

What is an SQP?

An ?SQP? is also known as a Suitably Qualified Person. This is the legal term that is used in animal medicine to describe a veterinary professional who is entitled to prescribe or supply certain types of veterinary medicines within the UK. There are approximately 5,300 SQPs in the UK, which includes over 600 who are working in veterinary practices as well as many others working in pet shops, country stories, agricultural shops and equine product suppliers.

In order to have attained this qualification, the staff members will have needed to take the relevant training and to also pass the AMTRA examinations. They will have also passed an oral exam conducted by an AMTRA Assessor. All staff members at Petfleas are AMTRA qualified, which stands for Animal Medicines Training and Regulatory Authority. AMTRA is an independent body that ensures that the prescription and supply of VPS animal medicines in the UK is undertaken in a completely responsible manner.

What Does This Qualification Mean?

Debbie Martin answered with the following “Suitably qualified people are able to prescribe and supply specific types of medication, depending on the qualification they have. There are different qualifications for non-food animals and those who work with farm animals that might have risks for the food chain.”

This ?SQP? title means that pet owners can be assured that the staff at PetFleas have the best interest of their pets at mind and are fully qualified to make the right recommendations when it comes to medications. This is part of the continued support of that Petfleas has for the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD), which is the agency that is responsible for issues that concern the use and manufacture of veterinary medicines within the UK.

About Petfleas

Petfleas, established in 2005, is a company that originated at the Beeston Animal Health Centre. It was one of the very first companies in the UK to specialize in pet flea treatment and prevention products and other health care products for pets, horses and farm animals.

The highly qualified staff at Petfleas is dedicated to providing knowledgeable advice to pet, livestock and equine owners across the country. All staff members have veterinary qualifications and they are committed to taking care of their customer?s precious animal friends.







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my sweaty self, my gym bag, my cat

One of the things they always tell you in vet school is “don’t go on gut instinct alone.” And this is a good point, because you can’t really practice sound medicine based solely on intuition. You get a hunch, then you follow through with science to prove or disprove your hypothesis.

Most of the time, though, you’re right, even if you don’t want to be. Like the time I was patting Nuke on his side and felt a mass pushing back on my hand. “Splenic hemangiosarcoma,” my mind spit out, and an ultrasound confirmed this.

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As did the fine needle aspirate when Emmett had lymphoma.

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And the radiograph when Kekoa had bone cancer.

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So when I got home from the gym today and Apollo was down in the hind end, dragging his limbs, I didn’t even stop to do a complete exam, never mind jump in the shower or even change. I did enough to know we needed to go stat, and we went straight into the car, my sweaty self, my gym bag, my cat.

So many things pointing to a saddle thrombus, and one thing that didn’t. And because we cling to the one thing that is off, the chance maybe we’re wrong in our suspicions, I decided that I would go from the clinic to the specialty hospital, because we were not sure and I wanted science to disprove my hypothesis, very much. My sweaty self, my gym bag, my cat, zipping along to the next stop.

Saddle thrombus, for those who aren’t aware, is a not-uncommon condition in cats with hyperthroidism and/or cardiac disease. It’s a big blood clot that lodges right in the part of the aorta that splits down each hind leg, and it’s a very, very unpleasant condition. Even more unpleasant than how I must be smelling at this point, which couldn’t have been great. I didn’t care.

The internal medicine specialist, doing what internal medicine specialists do, came up with a nice comprehensive estimate of all the things we could do, anticoagulants and catheters and needles, should our suspicions prove correct. The cardiologist performed an ultrasound, and his heart was definitely enlarged. Apollo’s legs were cold, his pulses nonexistent.

“You can do all these things,” he agreed. “Or not.”

“I’m trying to be realistic about what is going on,” I said. “I’m not wanting to put him through a lot of intensive interventions for another month at home before this happens again.”

The numbers, when you lay them out starkly, aren’t great. “Miracles happen,” the cardiologist said. He saw one, once.

And what I saw was this: my children, crying the next few nights as they wondered if Apollo was going to live. Visits to the hospital, where he stayed, unhappy and scared, with a 50/50 chance of making it out. The kids coming downstairs one morning next month to find him down again, dragging his hind end and yowling. One miracle against this likelihood.

My husband said, “I trust your judgment.”

I tell myself this all the time, and it’s a very personal belief but one I hold strongly: Just because you can doesn’t mean you should. And my gut instinct was telling me loud and clear as a bell: Come home. Your sweaty self, your gym bag, your cat, in the car, home. And it stinks because this is a case where you don’t have the luxury of proving or disproving your hypothesis, because you don’t get to go back in time to redo something if you made the wrong decision. Sometimes gut instinct is all you have.

It’s what also told me “there is no way you can do this yourself, even though you have been doing this professionally for a very long time,” so my friend Dr. Benson kindly agreed on zero notice to come out to my house after the kids said goodbye, and help him cross on over to KevinVille. While I arranged this all and paid for our diagnostics at the hospital, I stood in my ever increasing stinkiness and ugly cried in the lobby. I am an ugly crier. There is nothing to be done about this. And even though I’ve been through it a bajillion times, I still ugly cry because, well, it still sucks every time.

There was a ton of traffic on the way home, my sweaty self, my gym bag, my cat percolating in the car, so I had plenty of time to think back to the lovely 15 years we had together. Apollo outlived Nuke, Callie, Mulan, Emmett, a betta, and a hamster. He was a relic from another era, my first vet school pet. I thought he would live forever.

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He didn’t like being alone, so we got him a buddy. They were inseparable. He has a lot of friends waiting for him tonight in Kevin’s abode.

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We bought that couch in the late 90s. Don’t judge.

He never meowed singly, it was always in threes: meh-eh-eh? The third eh rising like a question, every time.

Are you up?

Got any popcorn?

This lap taken?

I’m so glad superstition did not keep me from adopting him oh so many eons ago. He brought me nothing but good luck, the sweetest cat I ever knew.

My sweet Apollo died today, and I am sad. My sweaty self, my gym bag… an empty pillow.

Meh eh eh? I love you.

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Pawcurious: With Pet Lifestyle Expert and Veterinarian Dr. V.

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Some Tips for Keeping Your Airedale Terrier Pet Dog Well-Behaved


Here are some tips you can use to keep your Airedale terrier pet dog well-behaved:

1) Can’t teach an old dog – You have to start training your Airedale terrier pet dog as early as possible. This is because of the fact that the earlier an Airedale terrier pet dog learns a trick, the faster they will be able to learn it. This doesn’t just apply to tricks. It also applies to general behavior. When your Airedale terrier pet dog is still just a puppy, you need to start training it. This way, the behavioral training that you give it will be ingrained into the Airedale terrier pet dog’s brain. This way, proper behavior becomes almost instinctive to the Airedale terrier pet dog.

2) Use, don’t abuse – Various training methods are made available for you by various experts. However, there’s one thing you should know: they only work with proper use. Some people make use of the leash or of the crate to abuse their animals. What you need to know is that each method of training can only be effective if used in a way that will not harm the animals. You need to be firm but gentle with your animal when you are trying to train it.

Use the various implements humanely in such a manner that will encourage your dog to behave well and not scare it from behaving badly.

3) Habit inside, habit outside – Before taking your Airedale terrier pet dog outside, try to observe its behavior inside. This will give you a clue as to how the Airedale terrier pet dog will act outside the house. Many people say that a dog’s behavior inside a house is very different from the way that the same dog will act in outside environments. This is not true. By observing the inside behavior of your Airedale terrier pet dog, you will realize how it will respond to you outside.

If your Airedale terrier pet dog does not listen to your commands inside the house, how can you expect it to listen to your commands outside the house where there are things a lot more interesting to a dog than your commands are?

4) Keep your temper – Training an Airedale terrier pet dog can understandably be very frustrating. However, you should not lose your temper. Negative actions such as hitting or shouting at your dog will not accomplish anything positive. Sometimes, we have a tendency to take out our frustrations on helpless pets. Do not blame your problems on the dog. If you know that you are having a bad day, do not even think about training your dog. All that you might get from the ordeal is a bad case of hyperacidity. Your dog will learn nothing and that would only increase your frustration.

5) Timing – Timing is always important. You need to make corrections regarding your Airedale terrier pet dog’s behavior while those corrections are still relevant. If you praise or correct with the wrong timing, you would only end up confusing the dog. Actually, the best timing you can use is to correct the Airedale terrier pet dog before he or she even starts to misbehave.
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SearchDogsUSA Launches New Online Store shopSDF.com


South Pasadena, CA (PRWEB) July 23, 2013

SearchDogsUSA Inc., official licensing arm of the National Disaster Search Dog Foundation (SDF), proudly announces the launch of http://www.shopSDF.com, a collection of fun and purposeful products for people and canines where sales proceeds support America?s search teams such as the ones deployed from Task Forces in Oklahoma, Nebraska, and California that searched for survivors after the tornados in Moore, OK last month.

“With some thoughtful new products, customers can have fun shopping and engage with us in our mission to deliver sustained revenue for SDF whose goal is to create 19 new search teams this year,” said SearchDogsUSA President, David Kaplan.

Founded in 1996 and based in Ojai, CA, the Search Dog Foundation is a national 501(c)3 charity that strengthens disaster response in America by recruiting rescued dogs and partnering them with firefighters to find people buried alive in the wreckage of disasters. Given America?s shortage of qualified canine disaster search teams (currently some 75 teams exist nationally), SDF relies on charitable giving to create and train the teams ? done so at no cost to fire departments or taxpayers. The organization has had some 95 deployments since it began.

As part of SearchDogsUSA?s THE POWER OF THE PLEDGE? campaign, the private company with offices in South Pasadena, CA pledges to raise over $ 50,000 this year for SDF ? through sales from http://www.shopSDF.com and through Business Alliance Sponsorships.

shopSDF spotlights officially-licensed SDF Logo?d Apparel including t-shirts and hoodies, plus Accessories & Gifts, Dog Collars, Leashes & Restraints, Grooming/Care, Playtoys, Dog Health & Wellness Products, and Emergency Preparedness Gear. You?ll find some top name brands including The Nutro Company NATURAL CHOICE

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Shelter Sunday: Riverside Rescue / Lunenburg, VT

Meet Tyson! This cute-as-a-button Rat Terrier is living in foster care in Lunenburg, Vermont under the supervision of Riverside Animal Rescue. Here’s what their web site has to say about this playful pup: Tyson is an older Rat Terrier that was surrendered because his owner could no longer care for him. He is very happy […]


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