Colorado, Summit County, Border Collie dog – US06 BJA0071 – Jaynes Gallery – 6 Inch Tile Napkin Holder

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Dog Training Blog | Tips and Dog Training Resources

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TRACIE HOTCHNER: YOUNG FEMALE LABS ARE DYING FROM LIVER DISEASE

rpln_logo300wThis week I learned something really worrisome that I had never heard about before: young female Labrador Retrievers are dying all over the country from liver disease that shows no symptoms at all! These seemingly healthy young pooches are succumbing to fatal liver failure that their owners and veterinarians did not realize was going on when they saw elevated liver enzymes in routine blood work. The saddest part is that if people understood the warning signs of liver disease, they could step in early and manage the problem, helping their dog to live a good healthy life.

The issue of elevated liver enzymes is one topic we discussed this week on THE EXPERT VET – my Internet radio show at www.RadioPetLady.com – that is co-hosted by Halo’s own Dr. Donna Spector. Dr. Donna is “the expert vet,” as she is a board certified veterinary internist, specializing in diagnosing medical problems that other veterinarians may not be aware exist. Certainly the owners of Labrador Retrievers, Westies, Dalmations, Dobermanns and Cocker Spaniels – to name a few – have not been alerted that their breeds have a genetic predisposition to irreversible progressive liver disease.

Once Dr. Donna sees these dogs between the ages of 6 and 10 years old – and they are in liver failure, there is nothing that can be done medically and their lives will end tragically early. However, Dr. Donna has found that if she goes back in their history, these dogs often had elevated liver enzymes when they had blood tests earlier in their lives when something could have been done.

The problem is that these liver enzymes are only mildly elevated – and the dogs seem perfectly healthy – and so this early warning sign is often ignored. The veterinarian usually advises that “we’ll just keep an eye on this,” when something should be done immediately. Unfortunately, Dr. Donna has seen many cases where “an eye was kept” on a dog’s blood tests year after year, and the enzymes remained only mildly elevated so nothing is done about it while the liver was being irreversibly damaged. Then one fine day the dog is in full liver failure and it is a tragedy for the dog and for her whole human family, too.

So please note: if you have one of these breeds in your family, you need to keep a vigilant watch on your dog’s liver enzymes. Ask for periodic blood tests from an early age. Each time, ask your vet for a copy of those lab results. As Dr. Donna says, we dog owners have to take a more proactive approach and follow up relentlessly on this topic – especially the millions of owners of the most popular breed in the country, the Lab.

You need to keep an eye on the situation and the minute you see an even a mildly elevated liver enzyme level you will know this is an early sign – the warning flag – of hepatitis or cirrhosis. If your own vet is not aware of how to manage this, then you need to immediately reach out to an internist like Dr. Donna, who does consultations with owners and their vets to help the dogs live a long, healthy life. You can listen to the podcast of this week’s show (and any previous ones) at RadioPetLady.com.

Halo

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Just Released Quarterly Business Plan from Valley Auto Loans Stresses on Creating a Zero Rejection Platform for Bad Credit Auto Loans.


Greenville, SC (PRWEB) April 06, 2013

Bad credit auto loans specialist Valley Auto Loans have just come up with the company’s detailed business plan for the current quarter. This plan has recommended implementation of stringent measures to achieve 100% car loan approval percentage for the company’s credit challenged applicants. Since many years, Valley Auto Loans have done well to offer innovative auto lending service to customers with bad credit.

To get the best car loans service in the country with bad credit, please apply online at https://valleyautoloan.com/apply-now2/.

Valley Auto Loans have recently introduced an excellent car credit policy that is build around the idea of providing easy approval too 100% of their applicants. Three months down the line, they have already come extremely close to achieving this praiseworthy milestone. Interestingly, no other lending company in America is even close to Valley Auto Loans, as far as serving bad credit applicants is concerned.

Discussing the gist of the company’s business plan for the quarter, a senior official from Valley Auto Loans said, “In the next 3 months, we are planning to launch a dedicated department for our bad credit car loan applicants. Our nationwide lending network will also be expanded by including new partners.”

About Valley Auto Loans: Valley Auto Loans is one of the most renowned providers of national and local auto loans. The company understands that it can be embarrassing and frustrating to not be able to qualify for a car loan or student auto loan. Valley Auto Loans connects consumers with the best auto lenders and helps them get approved for an auto loan quickly.







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The Dog of the Highlands: West Highland White Terrier

At around 1700s, the Isle of Skye and other highlands in Scotland were already producing lots of small terriers. Scottish breeds were separated into two: the Skye terriers and the Dandie Dinmont terriers.

The Dandie Dinmonts were categorized as a separate breed. The Skyes included the Scotties, the Cairns and the West highland white terriers or the Westies.

It was also noted that these terriers were the hybrids among the crossed Cairns, Scottish, and Dandies terriers. One could assume that the hybrid would really be loyal and its hunting instincts could not be belittled. In fact, many royalties in Scotland owned terriers that were very similar to the Westies of today.

Another remarkable story is about a Westie that stopped a mother from constantly yelling at her daughter. Every time the mother would yell at her teenage daughter, the Westie would attack the mother. The aggression of the dog got worse over the years that resulted in the mother’s complete inability to scold her teenager.

It turned out that the girl was actually rewarding the dog for his protection by calming and soothing him down after every “threat” from her mother. Many would perceive that the daughter was able to help her mother to change her ways when in fact she was helping herself by rewarding the dog for its behavior.

The following are some of the basic facts breeders would really love to know about Westies:

Category: Terrier
Living Environment: indoors (highly recommended); outdoors (fenced yard)

Coat: about two-inch coarse and wiry outer coat and soft, dense, and furry undercoat
Color: white

Height: between 10 and 12 inches

Weight: between 13 and 22 pounds

Temperament:

Naturally,

•    they like to bark and dig
•    they are not as willful like most terriers
•    they love companionship

When properly trained

•    they can become fairly friendly towards strangers
•    they develop close affinity with behaved children
•    they love to chase cats but they do not hurt them
•    they can become a very good watch dog
•    they can become very lively

Breeders should note of the following health issues:

•         Chronic skin problems
•       Perthe’s disease (hip problems)
•       Jawbone calcification
•       Cranio mandibular osteopathy (lion jaw)
•       Patella luxation, a disorder in the kneecap
•       Liver ailments
•       Deafness
•       Congenital heart disease

Care and Exercise:

•    Their coat should be brushed regularly using a brush with stiff bristles.
•    They should bathe only when necessary.
•    Their whole coat should be stripped at least twice a year and trimmed every four months.
•    The fur on the eyes and ears should be trimmed using blunt-nose mirrors.
•    They will surely be more agile and healthy after regular sessions of play and/or walk.

Origin/History:

As noted, they share the same lineage with Cairns and Scotties (from Skye terriers), and even with the Dandies. This trio was developed in the Isle of Skye, which was one of the highlands in Scotland. It was noted that white whelps were chosen from the wiry-coated Cairns, Scotties, and Dandies to produce the variety that were known as Poltalloch terriers.

Following are some items in the history that show the Westies’ reputation of being owners’ favorite companion dogs.

Records in the history mentioned that around 1620, King James 1 of England requested some small white dogs from Argyleshire in Scotland. Colonel Malcolm, who was considered as the originator of Poltalloch terriers, that are very similar to the Westies of today, accidentally shot his terrier (a dark one). From then on he vowed to have only white terriers.

In the 19th century, terriers that were very similar to the Westies were known as Roseneath terriers in honor of Duke of Argyll’s interest and patronage of this breed. Roseneath was the name of his estate at Dumbartonshire. 

In the first-ever dog show that were organized in the late 1800s, the Westies were called as White Scottish terriers. In 1904, they were classified under the name West Highland White terriers.

During the mid-1900s, breeders of the Cairns in Argyll, Scotland selected white puppies from the stock and interbreed some to obtain white Cairns. However, in 1917, the American Kennel Club ruled that Cairns could be listed if they have the Westies’ lineage.
  
We can say the history repeats itself for this delightful terrier is now mostly a favorite companion dog of many households.


Welcome to The Top Dog Blog!

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Welcome Home to Your New Pet. Now What?

According to recent statistics, more and more Americans are adopting not only their first companion animal, but their second and even third. The pervasiveness of multiple pet households indicates just how important pets have become in our lives, and that we want our existing pets to have companions of their own.

Having multiple pets increases everything: the joy, the cost, the hair, and the cuddles. As a veterinarian, I am often asked for advice on how best to integrate a new pet into a home that already has resident animals. In this post, I’ll be focusing on dog-only and cat-only households.

In a Dog-Meet-Dog World
When seeking to add an additional dog to your family, be sure to choose a breed, gender and personality that compliment your current canine. For example, it’s unwise to match a tea cup poodle puppy with a large or giant breed dog, especially an active one. Even if no harm is intended, the puppy could easily be injured. Similarly, be conscientious if you already have an older dog with arthritis, as a puppy could prove overwhelming. In general, opposite genders get along better, as do spayed and neutered pets (procedures I heartily endorse). In general, we would recommend the adoption of a dog younger than the resident dog; if the ages are reversed, tension could result, leading to recurring fights over who claims dominance. Of course, as I mentioned earlier, personality is an important factor. You know your resident dog’s disposition and it’s essential to take that into consideration when bringing a new dog into your home.

It’s always a good idea to have your existing dog as well-trained as possible prior to bringing a new dog into your home. Trust me, it will make your life easier and may even help facilitate the training of your new dog. As pack animals, dogs instinctively pick up the habits of their pack members. If you have a well-trained resident dog, then he or she can show the newcomer ‘how things are done’.

Even if your dogs seem to hit it off great from the get-go, don’t leave them unsupervised until you are certain that they have fully accepted each other. To that end, some experts advise that the dogs have time away from each other, as well as time off from you, too. This will help foster their bonds to you while also teaching them that it’s okay to be alone.

Feeding time can be a challenge with more than one dog. If the dogs compete for food, it may result in snarly spats and possibly overeating (at least, for one of the dogs). In addition, the dogs may develop the habit of ‘bolting their food’, or eating too quickly while not chewing their food sufficiently. Bolting may lead to serious problems like chunks becoming lodged in the throat, or cause GI distress like vomiting or diarrhea. The simplest way to avoid these problems is by feeding the dogs separately. If you have dog crates, consider feeding them while they’re safely ensconced inside their individual crates. Short of that, consider feeding in separate rooms, but be sure to close the doors! Whatever method you choose, make sure the feeding areas are places where your dogs will feel safe and will be able to eat undisturbed. Remember to remove the bowls after your dogs are finished eating.

Lastly, make sure that you purchase separate bedding, bowls and toys for your new dog. Some experts believe that it’s vital that each dog has his or her own property, as this will help your resident dog feel less threatened by the newcomer.

Cat Plus Kitty Doesn’t Have to Mean Catty
Just like with dogs, be thoughtful of your resident cats when bringing a new cat into your home. If your existing cat is quiet or reserved, then a mature companion can be good choice; if you have an active cat, consider getting a cat with an energetic disposition. If you choose to introduce an adult cat, try to find one who has lived in a feline community before. The best combinations are based on personality, so choose a cat with a temperament that compliments your resident cat. Adding together two unneutered male cats can be recipe for conflict. Please make certain that your newcomer has had a thorough veterinary exam and tests negative for intestinal parasites, feline leukemia and AIDS, as the latter two are highly infectious diseases.

The best way to introduce a new cat is gradually. A new feline in the home will likely lead to some measure of stress for your resident cat, especially if your cat has no prior experience living with other pets. Keep the new cat in an area separate from your resident cat, such as a bedroom or bathroom with a shut door, and introduce them in stages, using progressively increasing increments of exposure time. Never leave them unattended until both the cats appear to fully accept one another. Be forewarned, sometimes this process can take between a week and a month, depending on the temperament of both cats. Cats, by nature, don’t like change. Chances are, your resident cat may hide, ignore or hiss at the newcomer for a few days, so give your kitty some time to adapt. In the majority of cases, the household will resume normalcy over time.

In the meantime, there are things you can do to ease the transition. Give the new cat its own bedding, litterbox, food dishes and toys in an area separate from the resident cat’s belongings. Make sure both cats have separate areas where they can retreat to if threatened. Add additional cat trees and scratching posts around the house for environmental enrichment. You might also consider purchasing plug-in Feliway dispensers, which can reduce stress during the introductory period.

With a little bit of forethought and patience, you too will be able to welcome your home (and your heart) to a new companion animal and incorporate them safely into your existing family.

The Perfect Pet Food Blog

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DoggyInWonderland.com Announces Addition of All Natural Dog Treats


Houston, TX (PRWEB) March 31, 2013

Keeping pets healthy and happy is the goal of most pet owners today. One way to ensure their health is by feeding them all natural pet foods and treats. Doggy In Wonderland has offered all natural dog food and all natural dog treats since they opened for business.

They are now announcing that they have recently added three new all natural dog treats to their selections. They also increased their all natural dog food selections and added to their all natural cat food product line. Among these additions are Good Dog All Natural Dog Treats which are crunchy chicken treats that come in beautiful packaging. Their next addition is Zuke’s Z-Bones which are all natural grain free edible dental chews for dogs. These Z-Bones assist in keeping dogs’ teeth and gums clean and their breath fresher. Other new items for Doggy In Wonderland include Bully Sticks that are odor free and Made in the USA. These bully sticks are 100% natural and rawhide free.

“We are very excited about these new all natural dog treats because we know how important the health of pets is to our customers because it is very important to us as well. All of these treats provide healthier ways to feed and reward our dogs. Our dogs love all of them,” one managing partner expressed.

The company is currently holding a contest for a $ 100.00 gift certificate. Anyone who joins their newsletter before April 30, will be entered for a chance to win. The winner will be announced on April 30, 2013.

About DoggyInWonderland.com: DoggyinWonderland.com is a leading online pet boutique offering a wide array of pet accessories and other products for dogs and cats. This includes a full line-up of chic dog products such as stylish dog clothing, collars and leashes, pet furniture and dog beds, eco-friendly pet gear, healthy dog treats, dog toys, pet carriers, and a growing collection of cat products as well. Their goal is not only happy and healthy pets, but also 100% customer satisfaction. Call 866.280.1818 for more information, and see the full product range at DoggyinWonderland.com.







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Bless you, Bad Rap!! I wish there were more resour…

Bless you, Bad Rap!! I wish there were more resources like you out there to help people be responsible with their pets.
BAD RAP Blog

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Dog Training Builds Relationships

BuddhaA year ago if you had asked me to describe Buddha "aloof" would have definitely been one of the adjectives I used.

Buddha was an adult when we adopted him. He wasn’t fully house-trained and had no notion of using a crate. He was very agreeable around both people and dogs, but there was always an undercurrent of independence and, to use that word again, aloofness to him. Any physical affection was brief and on his terms and when I first starting working on training with him the joke was “He knows he’s going to get dinner at 5 either way.”

He was still a great dog. He was very well behaved once he got the hang of things (he was definitely an "outside" dog before coming to us.) Buddha has always exhibited wonderful interpersonal skills with other dogs. He is also very calm in busy situations, which makes great as a "demo dog" in classes and "neutral" dog for training exercises. This is what I needed when I got him and where his name comes from. This dog has Buddha nature.

But when we got home he tended to head to one of the beds and just hang out there. He was a bit of a loner.

Then last year I decided to attend the Dog Trainer Professional program at Karen Pryor Academy. This is a pretty intense course that spans several months, with a lot of both online and hands-on training work. I was attracted by the focus on hands-on training, “getting animals to do stuff with no force or coercion at all” is how I put it to one of my friends when I enrolled. (However I ended up learning a lot more than I expected. But that’s a future post.)

When you enroll in the course you have to enroll with a dog. Throughout the course there are training exercises both at home and in the classroom, and then in order to graduate you need to be able to complete a pretty difficult training exercise with your dog. (Again they’ll be a post on this in the future.) I of course had 2 choices: Caffeine or Buddha.

Facebook friends may remember this status a while back:

Porsche status

Caffeine is a very easy to train dog. Part of this is due to her temperament, and part is likely that we brought her home from a very savvy rescue at 9 weeks that had already started training her. I decided to take the challenge and use Buddha for the class.

We graduated a couple of weeks ago. The final training exercise was a bit harrowing (mostly due to me and recovery from shoulder surgery 8 weeks before the final class) but we did it. I also realized during that weekend that I had a different dog.

He’s not just “better trained,” whatever that means. He’s more connected to me and to people in general. His relationship with me and with the rest of the world is different.

About a week before the final classes Buddha and I attended Clicker Expo together. Clicker Expo has “labs” (no pun intended) in which you can work with your dog. I naturally decided to bring Buddha. He has always done better than Caffeine in settings like that and since I would be working with him the following weekend to graduate my class, it was a chance to work with him in different environments and maybe learn a few things that we could apply to class.

A friend that I used to work with at St. Hubert’s also attended the conference and said “I can’t believe Buddha! He’s a different dog.” This came as a bit if a surprise to me.

So I took stock of the new things Buddha has been doing lately.

  • When I get home from work at night Buddha runs to me with a toy so we can play.
  • When I wake up in the morning Buddha greets me. If I head right to the shower, he’s waiting in the hall when I finish.
  • If I get ready to leave the house, he waits at the door, as if he is ready to go with me.
  • If I am working at home I will get a visit at least every half hour for a back scratch or pet. He’ll also sleep on the bed closest to me.
  • If I am in the living room the dogs “play chess” to see who can sit with me.
  • The classes were far enough away from home that I had t travel and stay at a friend’s home overnight. The first couple of weekends Buddha slept in an open crate. By the third weekend he was in bed with me.

All of these changes are outside of the context of training. Naturally he’s better at training now, and the differences between him and Caffeine are more of a running gag than reality. But look at that list. Is he doing these things because he expects to get some treats? Of course not. He’s doing them because working together has created a stronger relationship.

Karen Pryor Academy talks about how training with positive reinforcement builds relationships. To be honest I was a little skeptical at first. Obviously training with positive reinforcement is more kind and more pleasant for everyone involved than the alternatives. But does this translate to a deeper relationship "off the field?"

Yes.

Training done right is a shared experience. Shared experiences build relationships. Get to work!

Dog Training Builds Relationships is a post written by . You can see the actual post at Dog Training in Jersey City New Jersey


Dog Spelled Forward Website and Blog

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Mobile Dental Clinic: Volunteer dentist treat children without dental care

Mobile Dental Clinic: Sometimes helping people in need are not in countries thousands of miles away. Sometimes the people that need help are in your own back…

Amoxicillin dental – link to online store http://SrDrugs.com/i/Amoxil#Amoxicillin-dental Amoxicillin (Amoxil) 250mg / 500mg Amoxil is used to treat infection…
Video Rating: 0 / 5

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Death Match: Social Media vs. Rotary

Two weeks ago, I had the honor of speaking at the AAHA National Convention as a part of the BlogPaws veterinary social media track. In a fit of what I can only imagine was perhaps a hypothermia-induced lapse in judgment, Bill Schroeder invited me to co-present for the day.

Bill Schroeder, Dr. Patrick Mahaney, that one person, Tom Collins, Dr. Lorie Huston, Kate Benjamin (courtesy Dr. Patrick Mahaney)

For those of you who don’t know, Bill helms In Touch Vet, a veterinary marketing company that works with 8,000 vet clinics across the country with website design and social media. And I, well, I manage one site, which is slightly less impressive, really. He’s spoken all over the world. I’ve spoken all over the midwest. I’m not entirely sure what he was thinking, but I didn’t want to correct his mistake, so I accepted his offer. And this is why:

Five years ago, there were about three veterinarians on the web. I attended a social media lecture at Western States and they held it in the basement, on Saturday night in Vegas, where a woman with no veterinary experience whatsoever got up in front of the bored looking crowd of 10 and attempted to explain what a “Facebook” was. Now, things have changed. I see more vets trying to get on board. I say “trying” because this is what tends to happen:

1. They attend a lecture, think to themselves, yup, I should do this.

2. Log onto Facebook, become immediately overwhelmed.

3. Back to work / consider asking receptionist to share some pics from George Takei’s page, or worse, post some dull news brief from an academic journal.

End experiment.

Done right, social media is fun, and engaging. I wouldn’t be here all this time later if I didn’t think that were the case (because trust me, I’m sure not making a living off writing on this site.) We’re lucky, as vets: we don’t need 20,000 fans or fans in Dubai or strangers we’ve never met, though I like all of those things; we just need a small and loyal group who support what we do. Being here makes me a better vet because it forces me to concentrate on my communication.

So I got up there with Bill, and he said all sorts of profound things and told some great jokes and showed some compelling slides. I watched. I said a few things, the most profound of which was probably my comparison of Twitter to a one-night stand (it’s not about long term relationships there, and that’s OK), but the one thing that struck me more than anything was: wow, we’re all still pretty far behind the eight ball as a profession. That, and the fact that I should wear lower heels when speaking.

The Fallacy of That One Vet From Michigan

Let me share with you something someone said after one session: a veterinarian, and I won’t guess his age because, well, I never do that anymore, came up to us and said: “yeah, this is great and all, and I’m sure where you are in San Diego everyone’s all into this social media thing (I can’t recall if he used air quotes or not), but I don’t need this where I am.”

So we asked where he practiced, and he said, “Michigan.” Then he said, “Only 2% of my clients use social media. I know this. We have data.” I wasn’t thinking of calling him a liar, since we are an honest profession of course, so I believed him. But then he said this: “So I just think maybe we need to focus on our traditional methods of new client recruitment. Like going to Rotary Club.”

Now look. I like Rotary Club. My father in law is a past president of a well renowned local chapter and the members are amazing. But I think even he would agree, that as a sole way of looking for new faces to come in the door, maybe it is a somewhat limiting strategy.

Social Media: Old People Like Me Use It Too

Then I really pondered what he was saying. Only 2% of his current base uses social media. Who are these people, 98% of whom eschew online interaction? Other than the local Rotarians, I mean. We know, generally speaking, that 67% of US adults are active on social media. According to pingdom, half of all social media users are 25-44, with another 20% 45-54. That’s plenty of middle aged people with pets, I think. More than half are women, who, at least in my practice, show up in the waiting area more than half the time. That works out well.

So I ask myself, does this person live in a small town of Luddites who eschew all forms of web based communication out of a sense of nostalgia? Is there really some place in this country so far off the national average outside of Amish country? Or is he simply handing over, to the clinic down the street, this huge chunk of potential clients who aren’t even aware his clinic exists because they don’t go to Rotary meetings?

Maybe it’s a San Diego thing, but I really can’t comprehend a town where more pet owners  attend Rotary than go on Facebook, or yelp, or any of the other places we now go to find recommendations for businesses. Perhaps, like the good men and women of the Old Mission Rotary, they do both.

I sense from many veterinarians the feeling that the internet, and social media in particular, is overrun with 14 year olds who go onto reddit, post a few LULZ and then get on with their day, none of which involves being the primary caretaker for animals. If that were the case, I would have abandoned ship long ago.

I, however, have spent the last half decade getting to know all of you, and I’m pretty sure that none of us are shopping in Forever 21. I think we’re all pretty solidly Ideal Veterinarian Client Demographic: educated, emotionally vested in our animals, and committed to their well being.

Social media: it’s not just for college kids and Beliebers.

And that connection I share with you all, that sustains me in my moments when I questioned my sanity going into the profession in the first place, is why I wanted to speak at AAHA.

I thought it went well, at least until I saw the first group picture.

Time will tell, I suppose.

Pawcurious: With Pet Lifestyle Expert and Veterinarian Dr. V.

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