Medical Rejuvenation Centre’s Anti-Aging Treatment Receives Commendable Reviews from Vancouver Medical Spa Patients


Vancouver, British Columbia (PRWEB) February 13, 2014

Medical Rejuvenation Centre?s Venus Freeze anti-aging treatment at Vancouver, BC has received commendable reviews from patients that have undergone the treatment at the Vancouver Medical Spa. Venus Freeze is a non-invasive and safe treatment that aims to be effective in circumference reduction, improving cellulite, skin tightening and wrinkle reduction. It makes use of two phenomenal technologies in medical science, namely Radio Frequency and Magnetic Pulses, to deeply and comfortably remove the signs of aging on the patient?s skin for the finest results. Venus Freeze is one of the 17 aesthetic medical procedures carried out at Medical Rejuvenation Centre (MRC), Vancouver.

What is Venus Freeze?

Venus Freeze is a painless skin tightening treatment that is as short as 15 minutes for the face and 40 minutes for the body. It is for patients that believe skin tightening would improve their appearance or are looking for something similar to Vancouver botox. Venus Freeze heats the skin from inside out to stimulate skin tightening naturally. It does not contain any threats of laser burns.

?I visited the Medical Rejuvenation Centre and had skin resurfacing done on my chin and mouth area. When I finished my treatment, I felt and looked like ten years had been removed from my face,? states Etta B., a patient of MRC in Vancouver. ?I went in looking like a grandmother, which I am, and came out looking pretty foxy. I also want to say that I appreciated how supportive Dr. Morrell (Skin Care Doctor Vancouver) and his staff were.? MRC?s Venus Freeze instigates the body?s natural healing response through the (MP) 2 technology. The treatment causes the skin to produce new collagen, while the production of elastin fibres is also part of the restoring response. When the collagen in the skin begins to contract, the skin looks and feels firmer than before. The function of the elastin fibre is to give skin its unique elasticity. Thus, the result is younger-looking skin which also comes across as natural and beautiful.

To find out more about Venus Freeze and other services by the Medical Rejuvenation Centre, visit the webpage http://mrcbc.com/.







More Mouth Press Releases

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How Much I Love My Dog

love-my-dog

I can’t describe how much I love my dog!

jredberry

The post How Much I Love My Dog appeared first on A Place to Love Dogs.

A Place to Love Dogs

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Book Review ~ A Christmas Gift for Rose byTricia Goyer

 
Title: A Christmas Gift for Rose
Author: Tricia Goyer
Publisher: Zondervan
Publish Date: September 24, 2013

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LoveMy2Dogs

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Latest Greenies Feline News

Las Vegas Veterinarian Announces Feline Dental Awareness Month
Now through the end of March 2014, the vet hospital is offering $ 30 off all dental cleanings and complimentary Feline Greenies Dental Treats. Las Vegas veterinarian Dr. Terri Koppe and her fellow feline veterinarians are raising awareness about the 
Read more on GlobeNewswire (press release)

5 Luxuries I Can't Enjoy Because of My Cats
I sometimes even offer kitty a sniff of the chip to show him I'm not going to town on his Greenies. Even after he has proof that I'm eating something he clearly doesn't want, he continues staring. Because now I'm a liar and there must be cat treats
Read more on Catster

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CyberKnife

Back in the backlot of an architecturally unassuming Westchester industrial park is the brainchild of two neurologists, Drs. Joseph and Berg, both brewed from the great crockpot of talent that is Manhattan’s AMC.  

The Animal Specialty Center is in many ways not unlike the dozens and dozens of veterinarian clinics I’ve toured around the country.  Dedicated  staff. Check.  Exceptional and compassionate care.  Check.  

One things stands out, however as the focal point.  And it stands tall.  

Say ‘Hello’ to my lil new friend, the Cyberknife.  

——–

Blake and Dr. Sue

To frame the entirety of this part of our story accurately, a bit of history is in order first.  I met Dr. Sue, one of ASC’s medical oncologists back in San Diego 2010 while giving a presentation about our Walk 1 – Austin to Boston – to the attendees of the Veterinary Cancer Society (VCS) Meeting.  

Come full circle, last October at VCS Twin Cities, we met again and she extended an invitation for me to visit their clinic in Yonkers.  A reunion perhaps of greater prescience than either of us could’ve known at the time as Blake, one of two beautiful rescue labs and part of the 2 Million Dogs family was diagnosed only weeks afterwards with meningioma becoming an ideal candidate for the Cyberknife.  

Blake’s mum, Chris, is one of our PUPS out of Baltimore and last week I spent time at ASC filming their story and learning about the relative benefits of Cyberknife vs. fractionated radiotherapy vs. stereotactic radiosurgery.  

Since I’m no scientist, I always try to reduce things down to their most basic elements and from my understanding, the differences between the three are merely a matter of time and precision.    

——–

Murphy

When he was DX’d with nasal adenocarcinoma just weeks after the conclusion of Walk 1, I chose  IMRT  once Withrow at CSU ruled him ineligible as a surgical candidate. I chose a slow course of radiation for an inoperable tumor and not only did it fail, Murphy developed a secondary Sarcoma in his nasopharynx.  

I got the best clinical advice at CSU but ultimately, I made a decision as a father rather than a patient and that faultline proved fatal and Murphy didn’t even make it a year.  

——–

That’s the trade off between the three types of radiology at least from a textbook perspective.  Time and precision and clinical outcome.   Blake underwent three days of Cyberknife treatment and godwilling, that’s all she’ll ever need.  

I firmly recommend exhaustive research and due diligence for the best most effective long-term treatment plan if you have a companion animal with cancer, along with the wise counsel of a vet oncologist.  

——–

I was grateful to be an honored guest at ASC last week; to herald in their 6 year anniversary, and most importantly, be there for friends of ours, Chris and Blake.  

And although I didn’t get a slice of their birthday cake, I have bigger sights in mind.  To a few trusty friends I texted the image of the Cyberknife and it scared the hell outta them in a RoboCop sorta way.  

Not me.  I’m from Texas and all I could think of was mounting it and riding it like Slim Pickens did a nuke in Dr. Strangelove into a blaze of glory.    

Thanks to the staff of ASC for being generous and accommodating during our time there and to Drs. Joseph and Berg for being pioneers in the field of veterinary medicine.  

2 Dogs 2,000 Miles

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2014 Westminster Breed Results as of 4:00 pm 2/10/14

Daytime judging is winding down. I’ll have one more update just after 6 pm, then the full list will run before 8:00 so you can be ready for the evening’s group judging. Here are a few updates that have come in since my last post: HOUND Dachshund (Long): GCH Kaycrees Galewinns Starburst at Wagsmore MLD […]


Doggies.com Dog Blog

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Treating a Dog With Bad Behavior

Dealing with bad behavior from your dog can be a problem that may seem at times to be too much to handle. Your dog may begin disobeying you in small ways, but that can easily transform into more aggressive actions and poor habits if you don’t put a stop to it.

The key to treating a dog with bad behavior is to learn what is causing your dog to misbehave and that can help you find a solution.

Most pet dogs like to be included in all your activities since they feel as if they are part of the family. Ignoring them or leaving them out of most of your family events can cause separation anxiety, resulting in unacceptable behavior.

Dogs going through their adolescent period will normally try to rebel against your usual routines. If your dog refuses to let you put on its leash or refuses to sit when commanded, it’s an indication that your dog is trying to better its ranking as an alpha dog. In other words, the dog is trying to one-up you in the game of “who’s in charge here.” Giving your pet firm commands while remaining calm will show it who’s in charge and help control its bad behavior.

If you’ve recently acquired a normally calm and friendly breed like a Labrador Retriever or Golden Retriever and it suddenly attacks another dog or a person, the problem is not a simple behavioral issue. Aggressive acts and unpredictable behavior like this usually indicates poor breeding practices. It can also be due to several other reasons such as puppies feeling pain from teething, feeling threatened, feeling pain from an injury, prior abuse, or a female dog that is in heat. If your dog is a puppy and nips or bites at you, saying “no” very strongly will usually startle it into quitting the disagreeable behavior.

A dog with bad behavior is not appreciated by anyone. When dogs become overly excited, especially small dogs, they often tend to urinate uncontrollably. This may happen when you begin playing with your dog or when a visitor, whether a stranger or frequent guest, comes into your house. This behavior can typically be traced to the fact that a dog is not being walked and exercised enough and its stored up energy results in urination problems. If you punish your dog and it doesn’t understand what it did wrong, it may urinate out of sheer nervousness.

Begging stems from natural instinct, improper socialization, boredom or desire for your attention. To stop this bad behavior feed your dog on a regular schedule and don’t give it snacks in between meals. Always ignore your dog when it begs.

Chewing on objects is part of the natural teething process in puppies. It may also be attributed to boredom, separation anxiety, undernourishment, or lack of sufficient exercise. If your adult dog is an obsessive chewer, you can put a little hot pepper sauce, or vinegar and hot mustard on items the dog should not be chewing and the taste will be enough to discourage that bad behavior. If your dog is chewing on items that can’t be coated with one of these substances, Petco and PetSmart have products to prevent unwanted chewing of objects.

Having your dog jump on you whenever you arrive home may seem cute, but most friends and guests won’t appreciate the enthusiastic behavior, especially if your dog is a larger breed. Consistently discourage the practice at the first signs of this behavior by voicing a firm “no.” To discourage such behavior, ignore your dog and avoid eye contact when it jumps on you. Tell your dog to “sit” and then reward it with a treat when it obeys. Daily exercise also helps to reduce the dog’s excess energy.

Treating a dog with bad behavior, especially an adult dog will be a lot easier if you think of your dog as being like a two year-old child. It needs to be trained and constantly reminded of what is proper behavior and what is not.

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Adopt a Pet, Live Longer!

A few nice healthy pet images I found:

Adopt a Pet, Live Longer!
healthy pet

Image by heypatrick
As the United States tumbles down the world health ratings list for life expectancy, adorable shelter dogs wearing “Adopt Me” vests want to make sure the public knows that pet owners live longer and healthier lives.

“We encourage the public to stop by the animal shelter to adopt, foster, and volunteer – the life you save may actually be your own” says Jane Hoffman, president of the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals.

For more info on adopting a shelter animal, or to foster or volunteer, New Yorkers can visit the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals website at www.AnimalAllianceNYC.org, or nationally, visit www.petfinder.com

Adopt a Pet, Live Longer!
healthy pet

Image by heypatrick
As the United States tumbles down the world health ratings list for life expectancy, adorable shelter dogs wearing “Adopt Me” vests want to make sure the public knows that pet owners live longer and healthier lives.

“We encourage the public to stop by the animal shelter to adopt, foster, and volunteer – the life you save may actually be your own” says Jane Hoffman, president of the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals.

For more info on adopting a shelter animal, or to foster or volunteer, New Yorkers can visit the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals website at www.AnimalAllianceNYC.org, or nationally, visit www.petfinder.com

Adopt a Pet, Live Longer!
healthy pet

Image by heypatrick
As the United States tumbles down the world health ratings list for life expectancy, adorable shelter dogs wearing “Adopt Me” vests want to make sure the public knows that pet owners live longer and healthier lives.

“We encourage the public to stop by the animal shelter to adopt, foster, and volunteer – the life you save may actually be your own” says Jane Hoffman, president of the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals.

For more info on adopting a shelter animal, or to foster or volunteer, New Yorkers can visit the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals website at www.AnimalAllianceNYC.org, or nationally, visit www.petfinder.com

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Feb 5, Dog probiotics | Best Dog Food Guide

Dog probiotics as supplement or probiotic dog food. Which option is best? Dog food often does not contain the species listed or in very low amounts.
Dog Food Blog | Best Dog Food Guide

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Canine Epilepsy

Canine epilepsy is a serious condition that causes seizures in dogs. Once the disease is diagnosed, epilepsy becomes manageable. Epileptic seizures are dangerous for a dog as it can easily be injured and fall into unconsciousness with no control over its muscles.

Recognizing canine epilepsy symptoms will help you treat the ailment in its early stages by getting the proper medication from your veterinarian and knowing how to keep your dog safe the next time it has a seizure.

Canine epilepsy becomes apparent when your dog has seizures that occur suddenly and without any warning signs.

Seizures can be triggered by something as simple as loud noise, bright lights, or a stressful situation.

When a dog has a seizure, it may fall down, stagger and have spasms. The dog may or may not lose consciousness, but either way it will have no control over its muscles and limbs. The dog will be breathing with great difficulty and will salivate excessively. There may be foaming around its mouth due to its fast breathing.

Most canine epilepsy seizures last less than a minute, although it’s not that unusual for one to last for 5 or 6 minutes. Apart from seizures there are no other symptoms of canine epilepsy.

Epilepsy may be caused by a genetic disease, tumors, blood clots in the dog’s brain, or damaged brain tissue caused by a previous injury. Seizures can also be caused by a heat stroke, poisoning, a calcium deficiency, or low blood sugar level.

If your dog has muscle spasms or suddenly falls down, it’s a good indication that a seizure is occurring. It’s important that you don’t hold your dog’s tongue during a seizure, because you could accidentally be bitten. Dogs usually don’t swallow their tongue during a seizure.

If your dog has a seizure, wait until it completely calms down and then let it rest for a while.

If your dog’s epileptic seizures only happen once or twice a year, medication is usually not recommended because of the somewhat severe side effects. If your dog has seizures on a regular basis, an anti-epilepsy drug should be prescribed by a vet.

Canine epilepsy is a rare but extremely severe disease and I sincerely hope it never happens to your pet.

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