Wisdom Tooth Extraction

I work at a Dental Clinic and i needed a wisdom tooth removed. So, here is the video of a soft tissue wisdom tooth removal. All it took was some numbing anes…
Video Rating: 4 / 5

WIN MY FAT SHIRT! http://youtu.be/sGLvaExILpE Yesterday’s Vlog: http://youtu.be/xMcNIkJAWoo *NEW SHIRTS & WRISTBANDS ARE HERE* GET YOUR SHAYCARL SHIRTS, HATS…
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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Doggie Tips For Cold Weather

Doggie tips for cold weather obviously isn’t anything you care about if you live in one of the southwestern states or Florida, but for the rest of the dog owners it’s important information to help keep their dog safe and warm all winter long.

If the weather outside is too cold for you, it’s also going to be too cold for your dog. If you live in a part of the country that has frigid winters, your dog should be kept indoors as much as possible during the cold weather months and never ever leave your dog alone in the car when the mercury drops below freezing.

During winter storms, city crews often put de-icers on sidewalks and parking areas to prevent people from slipping and falling. If a dog should get thirsty and decide to lap up some of the ice that has melted from the application of a de-icer, the water melt will be toxic and can cause sickness or possible death in a pet.

Prolonged exposure to dry, cold air and chilly rain, and the sleet and snow of winter can cause problems for a dog. Repeatedly coming out of the cold into dry heat can leave a dog with dry, itchy, flaking skin or severely chapped paws. Keeping your home humidified and drying your pet as soon as it comes out of the cold weather will keep it warm and comfortable.

If your weather is really cold and your dog has short hair, you can keep it warm by buying a pet sweater or coat to help your dog retain body heat and prevent its skin from getting too dry. It’s common to see small dogs dressed for the worst of winter, but size doesn’t matter when it comes to cold weather and your big dog will be just as comfortable in a warm and toasty sweater or coat.

When you take your dog for a walk in winter weather it’s also a good idea to have it wear winter booties with warm inner linings to help minimize contact with salt crystals which can be painful to a dog’s paws. It’s also the best way to keep your dog from stepping in poisonous anti-freeze and other chemicals used to melt ice, and inadvertently licking the toxic mix off its paws after returning home.

It’s not a good idea to give your dog frequent baths during cold winter weather. Bathing a dog too often removes essential oils from the skin and increases the chance its skin will become dry and flaky. If you must bathe your dog, use a moisturizing shampoo each time and dry the dog well.

Dogs burn more energy trying to stay warm in wintertime and this can result in dehydration. You can avoid this problem by feeding your dog just a little bit more food during cold weather (what dog is going to refuse extra food!) and be sure there is always fresh water for it to drink.

I hope these doggie tips for cold weather will help some of you pet owners who suffer through those long, cold winters.

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A Fond Farewell to Daisy, Who Was the Oldest Dog in the UK

It’s sad when a beloved dog dies, but the passing of Daisy, a Jack Russell Terrier who lived in Gloucestershire England, has garnered sadness from those who knew her and from people around the world. At 23 1/2 years old, Daisy was officially considered to be the oldest dog in the United Kingdom. She died quietly of natural causes at her home.

Daisy was originally adopted by Mark Barsby-Finch in 1993, when she was two years old. When she turned 22 last year, she celebrated it as her 100th — or at least the equivalent thereof, according to experts in her breed.

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The Rainbow Bridge by Shutterstock.

When celebrating Daisy's canine century, Barsby-Finch told the press that he attributed her long life to exercise, clean country living, and eating like a human being. For her entire life, she refused to eat dog food. For that matter, she didn't even eat scraps -- Barsby-Finch always made her a special portion and served it to her before the rest of the family ate. Daisy has never had a tin of dog food in her life. She eats exactly what we eat.

"Her favorite meal is roast chicken and mashed potatoes, but she'll happily eat anything," he told the press at Daisy's birthday. "She's partial to a takeaway Chinese, and she loves a homemade chili too, as long as it's not too spicy."

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Daisy celebrating her 100th/22nd birthday.

Much to our regret, Daisy will no longer be eating any chili, homemade or not. But even while feeling sadness and regret over her passing, there's a lot to be happy about. She lived a lot longer than a runt rescued from a shelter could have expected, and she got a lot more love and care than most dogs of any kind. Our congratulations to Mark Barsby-Finch for having given her so much love through the years, and our condolences on her passing.

Via Daily Express and Western Daily Press

Learn more about dogs with Dogster:


The Scoop | The Scoop

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Police dog put to death by authorities because he looked like a Pit Bull

Pit Bulls have been banned in Great Britain since 1991 under the Dangerous Dogs Act. Although there are no DNA tests to determine if a dog is a Pit Bull, they are judged on appearance, such as body length, head size and markings. The purpose of the law was to protect the public from dogs bred as fighting dogs. Tyson was one of 12 dogs rehomed to police departments from the Taunton area animal center….
The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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Adorable Baby Bulldog Lilly

My wife and I had been trying for another kid. That didn’t work out, but I did finally get a baby girl. Meet baby Bulldog Lilly!

The post Adorable Baby Bulldog Lilly appeared first on A Place to Love Dogs.

A Place to Love Dogs

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A Handful of Dog

Don’t you love the gorilla t-shirt on this macho guy and then how delicately he holds his little dog in one hand?  We met in Ventimiglia.  I reckon the dog is the tough one tho!
RIVIERA DOGS

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Dr. Alan Farber Offers Attractive Solution for Gum Disease by Performing a New

Dr. Alan Farber Offers Attractive Solution for Gum Disease by Performing a New
At Farber Center for Periodontics & Dental Implants, Long Island, NY area patients can receive the latest in minimally invasive gum disease treatment with Dr. Alan Farber's use of the Laser Assisted New Attachment Procedure (LANAP®). Traditional
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Dr. Keith Chertok Announces the Availability of All-on-4™ Dental Implants for
Dr. Keith Chertok is pleased to offer All-on-4™ dental implants near Oakland for local residents. This revolutionary dental implant procedure makes it possible for patients to receive dental implants even if they do not have a sufficient amount of
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Hudson, NY Dentist, Dr. Robert E. Danz Offers Patients Dentures Supported by
Robert E. Danz, DDS is a dentist in Hudson, NY who now offers his patients an effective alternative to traditional dentures that supports bone health and prevents facial restructuring. The conventional type are often ill-fitting and grow more
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Cures what ails ya

In the olden days, people used to turn to carnival medicine men or the back pages of Look Magazine for the latest way to solve all of their problems. People don’t change, just the technology. Now we have the internet to turn to. If the web is to be believed, and it always is for some reason, there is a new cure for all the world’s ills. That cure is coconut oil.

hair

It’s good for your hair, your skin, your GI tract, your dog, your mental health, and your aura. It’s anti-inflammation and pro-synergy. You can rub it on your scalp, then scrape it off and use it to cook, or sit on the leather couch and make it more supple. I don’t think there is a single malady out there that someone has not suggested coconut oil can fix:

Dry skin? Coconut oil.

Dry face? Coconut oil.

Yeast infection? You guessed it.

Alzheimer’s? Eat up.

Athlete’s foot, acne, depression, hemorrhoids, anxiety, UTI, weight loss, heartburn, autism. I guess what I’m saying is you could nuke your local CVS and be just fine as long as there was a Whole Foods next door, because coconut oil’s got you covered.

I’ve done a Whole 30 challenge, which is a no-processed food crossed with a tinge of Paleo, so I’m no stranger to coconut oil. I’ve cooked brussels sprouts in it, stirred it in my coffee, used it to make paleo pancakes. They were good.

Sadly, at the end of a jar I have to say my life has not substantially changed. Everything broken in me before is still broken. Coconut oil, while delicious and no doubt healthier than, say, margarine, has not eliminated my need for my allergy inhaler. I asked my doctor if I could try shoving coconut oil up my nose instead, just for a little while. It’s way cheaper than Dymista. She didn’t think much of the idea. When I told her I was just joking, then she sighed and said, “I get that question a lot.”

While coconut oil is unsurprisingly gaining steam in veterinary medicine, we have an equivalent that already enjoys legendary status in the home remedy category: pumpkin.

pumpkin

Long treated as the pet pepto-bismol, pumpkin is the go-to far various GI maladies spanning the range from constipation to diarrhea. It’s a great thing for the colon. It’s a great source of fiber and most pets will eat it. Pumpkin is Metamucil in a more holistic package.

What pumpkin is not is everything else, like an anti-emetic or anti-inflammatory or something that will teach your dog to talk. Like, it’s no coconut oil or anything.

On a friend’s Facebook page, she recently asked if it was possible for a pet to develop an allergic reaction to a food they’ve been eating for years.

10 people chimed in (correctly) that yes, this happens. Then someone said, “Why do you ask?”

“Because my dog’s been throwing up every time he eats all of a sudden.”

As a veterinarian, my mind immediately collates a list of the differentials when I hear something like this. 3 year old pit bull, history of being a destructive chewer, clearly the problem is “pumpkin deficiency.”

Which is exactly where the comment thread went.

“OMG! You need to give your dog some pumpkin.”

“Seriously! My dog loves it.”

“Pumpkin cured my dog’s farts.”

“Pumpkin is a great source of electrolytes.” And so on and so forth.

Don’t get me wrong, I like pumpkin. As far as advice on the internet goes, it’s one of the more benign things I’ve read and unlikely to cause harm. My only concern is that people recommend this in lieu of something that might actually work, such as starting with a correct diagnosis. Fortunately this person has multiple veterinary professionals on the thread, and somewhere in between pumpkin recommendations she got some solid advice.

A couple of weeks ago, my neighbor came over with her adorable 6 month old Golden Retriever. She hopped back and forth on her toes before asking me if I had any thoughts about her dog’s diarrhea.

“How long has it been going on?” I asked.

“Two days.”

“Go to the vet.”

“We’re going tomorrow,” she said, “but in the meantime……do you have any pumpkin I can borrow?”

I did. It’s on the shelf next to the coconut oil. Hope springs eternal.

 

PS The dog improved dramatically … once the vet diagnosed Giardia and started Flagyl.

Pawcurious: With Pet Lifestyle Expert and Veterinarian Dr. V.

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Grooming Your Golden Retriever


Grooming your Golden Retriever is a never ending process. The entire process should be down once or twice a week, and will take you around a ½ an hour of time. Brushing your dog while he is shedding will help to control shedding quite a bit. While outside, if your Golden Retriever manages to get burs or other defects in his hair, you should instantly take a few moments of your time and get the burs or other matter out of his coat.

When you groom your pet, you should always start with a good brushing. Brush his entire body, then once you have finished brushing you can switch to a comb to get out any loose hair that remains in the coat. While you are getting out the hair, you can also inspect your pet for ticks, fleas, and other types of skin ailments. If you wish, you can also check his ears and trim his nails as well.

Bathing your Golden is essential to grooming, and can be somewhat complicated. Before you attempt to give him a bath, you should always brush him first, to get rid of tangles. During shampooing, you should always use shampoos that are specifically for dogs, since human shampoo can dry a dog’s skin out. You don’t need to bathe your dog often, once every other week is good enough. If you properly maintain your Golden’s coat, you’ll find it’s much easier to clean.

To prevent matting, which is very common with Golden Retrievers, you should always make sure that you brush your pet on a daily basis. Metal combs and brushes work extremely well, and will help you to get a great deal of the hair out. Although some people choose to use scissors and cut the mats, you can easily injure your Golden if he happens to move or jerk. Scissors aren’t recommended, as brushing and proper bathing will help to prevent matting of the hair better than anything else.

When you cut your dogs nails, you should trim them a great deal, all the while avoiding going down into the quick. You should never let your Golden’s nails get too long, as long nails can easily take the shape of the dog’s foot, resulting in a splay. Therefore, you should always check your Golden Retriever’s nails and trim them every few weeks. If you trim them just right, you’ll have at least 2 weeks before they need to be trimmed again. If you do happen to trim the nails past the quick, bleeding will occur. To stop the bleeding, always keep some styptic powder on hand to make sure that you are prepared if you do make a mistake.

With other types of grooming, you should also make sure that you clean your Golden’s ears as well. They can get ear infections quite easily, if you don’t clean their ears on a regular basis. To get the best results and protect your pet from ear infections, you should clean his ears once a week using a quality cleansing solution. This way, you can rest assured that your Golden has healthy ears.

Grooming is an essential aspect to the health of every Golden Retriever. All it takes is a little bit of time from your day to groom your pet and keep him healthy. If you don’t have the time to groom your Golden, you can always take him to a professional. Whether you do it yourself or take your Golden to a pro – grooming is something that simply must be done.
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Low-cost dental care at the LSU School of Dentistry

Low-cost dental care at the LSU School of Dentistry
Gallo: If someone wants to be a patient, I have to set up a screening, which entails a brief medical history and dental exam. Because this is a teaching environment, we can't treat every case that comes in. We wouldn't treat someone who is severely
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Utah dentist offers breakthrough procedure to treat receding gums
Dentist Dr. Ryan McNeil performs Pinhole Gum Rejuvenation on a patient at his office in Midvale Friday, May 30, 2014. The technique repairs receding gums instead of the older grafting technique. Healing is quicker, no cutting or grafting are required
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