WORKING OVERTIME TO HELP OVERWEIGHT PETS

fatcat

Pet Product News recently reported on the current trend in our country of overweight pets. They mention Halo natural pet food in the article:

“Though not labeled as being for weight loss, many of Tampa, Fla.-based Halo, Purely for Pets’ natural pet food offerings meet the Association of American Feed Control Officials’ “light” criteria.”

Thank you Pet Product News for the recognition!

Click here to read the complete article on Pet Product News.

Click here to read Weight Management Pet Tips With Dr. Donna Spector.

Halo

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Why You are More Powerful Than Any Counselor

The phone rings, and I answer it with an admittedly impatient voice since someone sold my phone number to a marketer and I’ve been getting deluged with spam calls all week. I have the phone in one hand and Brody’s tail in the other, as he chewed up his bandage when I wasn’t looking and now I have to re-wrap the whole thing.

It’s Chaplain Gary this time, calling as he does, every few months, to see how I am doing.

I met him once, when he came to the house to talk to the kids when my mom was sick and give them a book. They sat looking at their hands, not sure what they were supposed to say to the stranger who was trying to get them to open up about their fears.

“We’re fine,” they say, because that is what they see me say. It is what all New Englanders learn to do from a young age, saying they’re fine even when their house is on fire, their leg has fallen off and one eyeball is hanging by a stalk. “Fine fine, under control, it’s fine.”

“I just was wondering how you guys were doing with the anniversary coming up,” he says. Ah yes, Easter, the last holiday we shared together as a family, the week before my mom’s seizure changed everything and brought our charmed existence to a screeching halt.

“Fine,” I say, “We’re hanging in.” Brody forgets his distress over his tail and puts his head in my lap, sensing the tension in my voice.

The chaplain calls because it is his job, and I am grateful he is there, but he’s not the one I want to talk to. He cares, but he doesn’t know me. When I see a butterfly zip by out of the corner of my eye and I’m hit with a wave of sadness, I want to talk to my sister. When I wake up from a dream where I’ve been out with my mom doing the little mundane things we always used to do- grabbing a Starbucks, pawing through the racks at Marshalls for a deal, I want my husband to hold me when I explain why I woke up crying. When I greet my Dad on Sundays and we both look at each other a little lost, I want Brody to come up and bully him into giving him treats, because that’s one of the few consistent ways to get a smile.

Grief is a family affair, and we’ve completely forgotten how to do that as a society.

Loss: The elephant in the room

Loss: The elephant in the room

When I started with Paws into Grace, I thought it was such a great boon to offer people a comprehensive list of pet loss support groups, counselors, social workers, psychiatrists. Don’t get me wrong, it is a good thing, but I was naively surprised when people almost universally declined to use their services. They are there to fill the void of a support system we no longer have and to help those in crisis, but it doesn’t replace our innate desire to turn inward during these times, to those close to us.

I gave a talk last year at a hospice conference about grief around the world, and one universal commonality was the ritual of community, surrounding families like a cocoon as they healed, giving structure and a safe place surrounded by friends to fall apart and, slowly, rebuild. Most important of all, the cocoon, the safe space, comes to the family- not the other way around. It takes a lot of energy to be sad, and who wants to do that in a strange place like a church basement, surrounded by other strangers, when you could be at home in a Snuggie close to the coffee pot and your dog.

I was at Western Vet Conference this week, and I ran into my friend Bill, who even in a rush to get to his upcoming afternoon of talks took a moment to say, “I’ve been thinking of you.” That meant more to me than 50 calls from the stranger chaplain. This is how it’s supposed to work, right?

When someone near to us loses a loved one, it seems these days that our instinct is to run away instead of to them. It is, I think, because we’re scared, we don’t know what to do, and no one has taught us how to scrape someone off the pavement. We don’t want them to know we’ve seen them upset.
 

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We’ve made grief pathological, something ‘wrong’ that needs to be fixed by a professional, implying that we are somehow broken for having felt it. We’re so removed from this part of living that we can’t even manage the basics of grieving, needing booklets and chaplains and groups to manage even the simple things like, “am I normal to feel sad.”

As always, I keep trying to file these tidbits away into something useful for my own work, and in this case it’s dawned on me that it’s not the person who lost a pet who needs the guidance, but their family and friends. It’s a work in progress but it feels right, just as it’s a reminder to me how to be a better friend. I know 3 friends who lost a parent this year, and countless more who lost other beloved pets and family members. One little note from a friend, a Facebook message or a mailed card, means more than 50 calls from a stranger.

This is something we can all do well to remember.

Pawcurious: With Veterinarian and Author Dr. V

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Iditarod 2016: Winners have crossed the finish line

video platformvideo managementvideo solutionsvideo playerEarly this morning in Alaska, the top three musher crossed the finish line in Nome. As predicted, the Seavey men took the top two spots, with Dallas taking the lead. Aliy Zirkle came in third. The video is from KTUU in Anchorage. Here are the top five as of 3 pm […]


Doggies.com Dog Blog

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I Don’t Look

I swear I don’t obsessively look for lumps on Lacey.  I do check out her feet and legs more than most I’m sure, but I don’t give her full body rubdowns looking for more lumps.  Regardless I think I’ve found another one tucked in at the base of her ear.  It’s just little and I’m hoping it will turn out to be a little bug bite or something and go away on it’s own but I don’t really believe that.  She’s been licking the floor a lot lately and we’ve noticed her bugging at her anal glands a bit lately too.  The latter is definitely not a good sign and while I’m not sure if the floor licking is related, we swear it increases when she has a tumour although she always does it a little bit.

Anyway, I’ve got an appointment for Monday. Keep your fingers and paws crossed it turns out to be nothing more than a paranoid dog mom.

Crazy Coulee and Little Lacey

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Cougar suspected in the death of LA Zoo koala

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“It wasn’t me!”

The Los Angeles Times reports that a cougar is suspecting in killing one of the LA Zoo’s koalas earlier this month.

LA is home a famous cougar called P-22. This cat lives in Griffith Park, and it’s generally thought his diet is mostly raccoon and coyote.

But it is thought that the cat leaped over a 9-foot fence to kill a female koala named Killarney. For obvious reasons, koalas have never been cougar-food, so P-22 would have been the first of his kind to try hunting one.

There is no hard evidence that P-22 did the deed, but trail cameras revealed that he was stalking near the zoo  the night before Killarney was killed.

The evidence is solely circumstantial, but the chances of coyote or bobcat getting over a 9-foot fence and carrying off a Koala are pretty remote.

This story reminds me of what happened to one of Jim Dutchers wolves that were kept in a large enclosure in the Sawtooth Mountains of Idaho. One of them spent a lot of time by herself, and one day she turned up missing.  Scratch marks on a tree inside the enclosure revealed that a cougar had come in and killed the wolf, but then the rest of the pack discovered the cat and treed it, eventually chasing it off the premises. A cougar will take on one wolf but not six.

Cougars once lived over much of the the United States. Although incorrectly called “mountain lions,” they are ecologically equivalent of leopards in the Old World. They are out of the same lineage that gave us the cheetah and the jaguarundi, which is actually now classified with the cougar in the genus Puma now.

As these cats return to their native range, conflicts are bound to happen. In LA, one would have assumed that the biggest problem with this cat would have that he started carrying off dogs, but I’ve not heard of any cases of him doing that.

But if he took out a koala, it’s very likely that he’s in need of better food sources than raccoons and coyotes.

And maybe it is time for LA’s cougar to find a new home.

Koalas now. Labradors next.

Let’s hope it doesn’t come to that situation.

 

 


Natural History

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Deer in the gray thicket

Got some nice footage of some deer on the trail camera this week.

One is a bit goofy:

The other is a beautiful scene as trio of deer come through the thicket after a rainy night:

There is a major deer bedding area under the red oaks on the opposite ridge. Last weekend, I spooked twelve of them off their beds.

These are heavily pressured deer, so it’s pretty hard to get decent photos and film of them without using trail cameras.

I try, of course, but you’ll never get closeups like the one in the top video with a regular camera!

 


Natural History

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TRACIE HOTCHNER: GET A CO MONITOR FOR YOUR PET’S SAKE – IF YOU HAVEN’T DONE IT FOR YOURSELF!

newtraciepic2It never hurts to repeat a safety message, especially when it pertains to dangers to our pets.

You don’t necessarily think about carbon monoxide, the deadly odorless gas that can come from a malfunctioning space heater, but it can kill everyone in your house.

A year ago I wrote about the serious need for a CO monitor in your house or apartment – you should have one right along with a smoke detector.

If you didn’t read this before, or don’t remember it, here’s the chance to refresh your memory and also tell at least three other people to get a CO monitor.DFF-logo-ProudSponsor175x166

Then they will tell three other people and a community effort at passing along the warning may ensure that no human or pet lives will be tragically lost.

Click here to read the complete article.

Tracie began her fascination with dogs and cats by turning her eye as a former investigative reporter on every aspect of living with them, resulting in her encyclopedic resources THE DOG BIBLE: Everything Your Dog Wants You to Know and then the THE CAT BIBLE: Everything Your Cat Expects You to Know. Before long, Tracie was established as a leading pet wellness advocate as her all-encompassing books covered everything from medical issues to behavior, nutrition and environmental enrichment.
RPLN-NewLogo-ProudSponsor175x197
Tracie began her career as a radio personality with a live show – DOG TALK® (and Kitties, Too!) – on the local NPR station in the Hamptons, Peconic Public Broadcasting (WPPB) from Southampton, New York (the show is now also carried on the NPR station Robinhood Radio in Connecticut and the Berkshires).

DOG TALK® won a Gracie® Award (the radio equivalent of an Oscar) in 2010 as the “Best entertainment and information program on local public radio” and continues weekly after more than 450 continuous shows and 9 years on the air. Tracie’s live weekly call-in show CAT CHAT® was on SiriusXM satellite radio for seven years until the Martha Stewart channel was canceled in 2013.

Tracie lives in Vermont where the Radio Pet Lady Network studio is based, on 13 acres well-used by her all-girl pack – two lovely, lively Weimaraners, Maisie and Wanda, and a Collie-mix, Jazzy.

Halo

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Cutie pie

This beyond cute Pomeranian was waiting patiently for her owner to take her home.  She’s at Cap 3000, a massive shopping centre at Saint Laurent du Var, just beyond Nice.
RIVIERA DOGS

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Calling coyote

I purchased a diaphragm coyote call a few months ago from MFK. I wanted to liven up the blog with some possible coyote photos and videos, and coyote hunting is one of those things I’ve always wanted to try.

It’s much harder than it looks, especially if the coyotes in your area don’t howl that much and are generally unresponsive to howls and other vocalizations.

However, I eventually did get lucky. I set up about 100 feet deeper down an Allegheny bench. I howled three times and let loose a few bitch-in-estrus whimpers.

I noticed some movement to my right. Something yellow was advancing across the bench opposite mine across a small ravine.

That’s when I knew it. I had a coyote coming in. I just got ready for him to come up from the ravine. What follows is, well, pretty hard to believe. If I didn’t have the photos and the video proof, I still wouldn’t believe it.

This is not a zoo animal. This is backwoods West Virginia, and this is a very wild Eastern coyote from a population that is as pressured as any on the East Coast.

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So calm and relaxed that he stops to scratch an itch!

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He paced around me for about ten minutes. He was looking for the bitch. If he started to wander off, I would just whimper a bit through the diaphragm, and he’d come back.

This is one of those moments when you realize how great it is to be alive.

Too look into those wild yet sagacious brush wolf eyes is to be taken back to a time when the only dogs were wild ones.

It was  my pleasure to have had this opportunity.

I met a wild one.

And it doesn’t seem real.

 

 

 


Natural History

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PetsitUSA’s 2015 Featured Pet Sitter: I’ve Got the ‘Scoop’!, LLC

Here’s an interview of Lori, owner of PetsitUSA’s 2015 featured pet sitter, I’ve Got the ‘Scoop’!, LLC.

Thank you, Ryan!  It’s very exciting being interviewed by PetsitUSA and having the opportunity to help new pet sitters by sharing my experiences and insight.

Can you give us a little background about yourself?!!lori daisy expert pet sitter Pet Valu petsitusa

When I first started pet sitting, veteran sitters gave me the typical advice about learning to say “no,” setting boundaries, turning my phone off and never putting my business before my fam
ily.  I ignored it all, and I’m not going to offer that advice, because the benefits of owning a business allows each of us, as individuals, to make decisions based upon our personal goals, abilities, threshold, ethics and devotion to our pet parents and furry babies.

Our circumstances vary, from familial responsibilities, some transition from another profession still working another job, while others have no time constraints or limitations.  The most important consideration is determining the needs of your clients and their beloved pets, because that’s why we become professional pet sitters:  To provide care needed for animals in the absence of a parent and/or when a parent requires our assistance with their pet.

Because my dedication is extreme and I lacked the ability to say “no,” implementing policies was necessary.  That is one suggestion I strongly recommend; have policies in place you are comfortable with, review them with clients, and have each client acknowledge acceptance of the terms by way of their signature so there are no miscommunications.  I adhere to my policies; however, there are situations warranting my waiving them without hesitation.

Change and restructuring typically means acquired knowledge and growth, not errors or poor decisions!

2015 was my fifth year providing love, enrichment and comprehensive pet care for furry babies with my pet sitting business, I’ve Got the ‘Scoop’!, LLC.  It has been a very rewarding year professionally with awards, recognition, community outreach events and expanding my non-profit volunteer efforts.  Unfortunately, working independently leaves minimal time to celebrate these accomplishments.

Being a recipient of NAPPS’ 2015 National Pet Sitting Business of the Year Award, and Winner of “The Best” Pet Sitter & Dog Walker of Burlington County, in The Best of Burlington County Times 2015, were both amazing honors I cannot believe I received!  I work endlessly and my devotion is second to none; still, to be nominated and voted for by clients, colleagues and the community are most cherished honors!  Another wonderful compliment was becoming a Board Member of the Boo Tiki Fund, a non-profit charity whose mission is to leave no pet without veterinary care.  Families experiencing grave financial hardships may receive a grant for their pets’ urgent medical needs.

I am extremely proud to have organized and hosted South Jersey’s Annual Pet Wellness Symposium for the
past two years and am looking forward to the third annual event on April 16, 2016.  It’s a fundraiser and powerful learning experience for all attendees.  Elite veterinarians volunteer their time and present educational lectures to pet professionals, parents, animal welfare heroes and members o2015 South Jersey's 2nd Annual Pet Wellness Flyerf the community alike, and some of the lectures incorporate live animals for a hands-on learning experience.  Pet businesses have an opportunity to showcase their services, also.  Last year’s symposium included a children’s component with a Bite Prevention class presented by fellow pet sitters, Endless Pawsabilities, reading with the Furry Angels Therapy Dogs, and a community service workshop to benefit FOBCAS and homeless animals at the Burlington County Animal Shelter.

A particularly fun event I planned the past three years has been the Spooktacular Pets of our town’s annual Halloween Parade, facilitating community members of all ages to participate in the festivities, even if their children have fur!  Animal lovers have the opportunity to walk with the doggies, and it’s a safe alternative for children and pets to enjoy a fun-filled family event!

Most recently, I started KiSS!, a Kitty Sponsorship Series, helping senior and fragile homeless kitties KiSS! their cages at a shelter and life in rescue goodbye, by sponsoring their adoption fees.  Another rewarding endeavor was raising money to donate 14 Fido Bags to local fire departments and first responders through the Fetch Foundation.

Although I organize and host many events, they’ve only been possible thanks to relationships I’ve established through volunteering and networking, having cultivated amazing collaborative efforts to benefit animals in need and those who love them.  I could never have accomplished these myself, and I thank the Borough of Palmyra, NJ, for their assistance in making these events possible.

But life and business are not always happy, happy and success, and a professional pet sitter must always have a solid backup plan in place for unforeseen emergencies.

2015 has been most challenging personally, having a scare with breast cancer, working with great physical pain, enduring procedures on my neck and back, and facing far too much loss.  The devastation of losing furry babies for whom I provide care is what I find to be the most difficult aspect of pet sitting.

My precious kitty, Simon, the love of my life, began having seizures and was diagnosed with hypertension and renal disease.  That weekend my father died suddenly.  Recently, both my mother- and father-in-law were diagnosed with cancer, and just a couple months ago, my very special, one!!!halloween petsitusa-of-a-kind, Simon, became an angel.  He was incredibly loving and a tremendous support to me and my son.

I don’t typically shout out about myself, but it’s important to know this can be you and so much more!  Always remember, because of you, pet parents are able to create wonderful memories, be available for work and familial responsibilities, and have peace of mind to walk out the door leaving their furry babies behind.  Always feel honored you were chosen by each parent and be thankful you have the opportunity to care for their beloved pets.

Please share what prompted you to start your pet sitting business:

My wonderful son, Billy, was diagnosed with diabetes at the age of 18.  He has significant special needs, and because of his cognitive challenges and inability to care for himself, let alone the continuous monitoring of blood glucose levels, multiple injections, exact measurements of food portions, his intake of all solids and liquids, carb counting, testing urine, etc., he required private-duty nursing when I was not with him.

A month after discharge from the hospital, Billy was diagnosed with renal and cardiac disease and required additional medications and intervention.  Because of his challenges with communication and extreme developmental delays, his care was very individualized with protocols specific for “Billy.”  He was not to be treated as “text-book” diagnoses.  In an attempt to keep stress at a minimum, necessary care was slowly integrated into his daily routine, which already was demanding.

After a few nurses were hired, they were quickly fired when care was to be provided “their” way, not what was best for Billy.  Despite having detailed orders written by physicians and my wishes to make life a little happier and more manageable for Billy, each nurse wanted to modify his regiment.  Sadly, they were unwilling to deviate from the “standard” and learn how to maintain his stable status.

This resulted in leaving my profession as a court reporter and accounts manager of the firm, after 15 years, so I would be available to provide care for my son.  At 47 years old, I wasn’t sure in what direction I would go.  I then realized there were parents in need of care for their dependent, beloved pets as I needed for my son; hence, founding my company, I’ve Got the ‘Scoop’!, LLC – Providing Love, Enrichment and Comprehensive Pet Care… as though YOU were there!

Why do pet owners choose your business over others in your area; is there something special that attracts your clients?

I ask this question of my pet parents, and their responses share many similarities.  Our relationship begins when parents view the love displayed in my photos and they tell me it’s obvious how much I care from the first time we speak about their pets.  My initial consultation is quite extensive and families’ comfort levels increase more so during that time.  I obtain a very thorough history and spend a substantial amount of time inquiring about specific details, observing, playing and interacting with their beloved pets, learning as much as possible.  This leads to establishing a bond that only grows stronger with subsequent visits.  Often times, a cat considered to be very skittish or a dog with anxiety that normally does not engage with strangers right away, if at all, warm up to me quickly, leaving pet parents astonished.  Their worries and anxieties are alleviated.

Parents remark how I genuinely adore their beloved pets and love the special bonds we share.  Pictures and videos I send depict their happiness and contentment, and parents feel their furry love
s are safe.  I am certified in animal first aid/CPR, participate in continuing education classes and keep up to date with current recalls and product information.

Since I do not use independent contractors or hire employees, it’s me, personally, coming to each visit, and parents are confident their pets are extremely well-cared for.  They are assured of my secure backup plan in the event of an unforeseen emergency, and most of my lovies have already met the only person I trust with them, my fiancé, Dan.  He is incredibly patient, compassionate, loving, observant and meticulous with details, and joins me during visits, in advance, so he’s not a stranger and is familiar with their routine if he is needed.

Parents have peace of mind knowing I’ll be available to communicate with detailed updates.  I ask for clarification, if needed, and technology has not taken over the personal service I provide to my families.  They also appreciate how I limit the number of pets on my schedule each day to allow for lengthy visits.  I spend quality time with my furry babies, becoming well aware of their individual needs, what makes them happy, feel loved and secure, and how the time their family is away may be most enriching and fun.

Whether a family is on vacation or gone for the day at work, the care their pet receives is
the same; it’s very comprehensive, not just walking and feeding or scooping a litter box and leaving.  We have spa days with preventative care, brushing hair and teeth, even cleaning ears and clipping nails if needed, extended walks or playtime, and lots of lap time full of hugs and kisses.

Families’ security and privacy are taken very seriously, as well as the safety and well-being of animals in my care.  I am very attentive to accommodating special requests and following detailed instructions others may feel are extreme or unnecessary.  Parents feel very confident with my thoroughness and abilities, and have peace of mind when their pets are in my care.

My precious kitty, Simon, had special needs, as well as my son, and it is because of he and Billy I understand the significance of small details, observant of nonverbal communication, aware of changes in routine and behavior of my furry babies, and highly respect the wishes of every pet parent as I wish a nurse to do for my son!  This all contributes to providing a higher quality of care which should be the standard practice of every pet sitter.

!!Lori Best of PetsitUSA 2What are some of the most useful advertising tools that you have used? 

I’m not fond of the word “advertise.”  Maybe because I cannot afford an advertising budget.  [Laughing]  Most say a business must have one; I disagree.  My passion for animals, knowledge and willingness to help all pet parents, not just clients, and networking with other pet professionals, earned me the reputation as a professional pet sitter and resource in my community.  People refer me by sharing their experiences and the exceptional care I provide for their pets, as well as the photos I send to parents display all of the love and fun we share.  Volunteering your time and becoming known as the expert pet sitter in your community is most rewarding.

How has social media impacted your business over the last few years? 

It consumes too much time!  However, social media allows me to reach a larger audience much faster.  I’m not good at sending quick messages, as I like my communication to be personable.  This tends to delay getting information out because of having to sit and write detailed emails.  With social media, providing pertinent information can be done expeditiously by sharing a post or an article; whether it’s alerting everyone to recall information, outbreak of infectious disease, wellness information, a lost pet in the community, health-related studies, seasonal tips to help protect our pets, a fundraising or adoption event.  It’s a quick way to share information from which others may benefit.

Do you have any general advice for new pet sitters?

If you wish to become a Professional Pet Sitter, you must earn the title and always respect it!!!

  • Distinguish yourself as professional.
  • Credentials are vital!  You should maintain current credentials and documentation to provide at every consultation: A passed background check, Certificate of Insurance for commercial liability coverage and any licenses and registrations.
  • I personally would not enter anyone’s home or provide any services until adequate insurance is obtained. I am not an expert in insurance, but highly recommend you evaluate the coverage of your policy and be certain you have, at minimum,  protection for the following:  injury/negligence/loss to animals in your care; injury to  any persons and/or pets caused by an animal in your care; theft/negligence/damages to clients’ personal belongings and property. You get what you pay for; lower premiums typically mean lesser coverage.
  • Inquire about local, state and federal laws re: business registration and licenses, to ensure you are operating a legitimate business.
  • Build up your references to include both pet parents and professionals.
  • Obtain Animal First Aid/CPR Certification and participate in continuing education. Be prepared for an emergency, as your intervention may very likely save an animal’s life in your care.
  • Allow sufficient time for each pet’s visit or you will compromise the quality of care you provide.
  • If you are uncomfortable with a request for medical care or administration of medication, or have questions, contact the treating veterinarian. I always obtain verification from their vet if medication is to be given in the absence of a current prescription.
  • I would not provide care if it makes you uncomfortable. Trust your instincts if there are red flags and respectfully decline to provide services. That was another piece of advice I was given: You do not have to work with every family that contacts you. The distance may be too far; you may not agree with training techniques; the home may be unsanitary; a family cancels too often or fails to pay for your services. Remember, it’s your business and the choice is yours.
  • Network with other professionals. Observe new situations when possible and be receptive to learning from those willing to help you advance with continuing your education.
  • Develop relationships with veterinarians who foster wellness, are willing to teach you new skills and answer your questions to ensure continuity of care for mutual clients.  I am so thankful for local veterinary practices whom are always willing to help.
  • Establish a presence in your community. Get involved. Help raise awareness and support a local charity. There are various ways to help other than making monetary donations.
  • Make a difference in a family’s life by spending extra time with a beloved pet during end of life, donate your services and provide care from your heart for someone during a crisis, purchase food and supplies for a family in need…show how caring professional pet sitters are by helping a family and their furry loves.
  • If monetary gain far exceeds your desire to create betterment in the care of animals, seek out a different position and leave the hands-on care to others.
  • Always manage your business the way you choose to, rather than being influenced or discouraged by other pet sitters: Hours, rates, growth of your company, remaining a sole-practitioner, services you offer, use of technology, types of payments accepted, are decisions you make.
  • Don’t be afraid to do things differently or bark louder… just make a difference and be puuuurrfectly proud of yourself for becoming a Professional Pet Sitter!!!
“You mentioned mandates of minimum standards for professional pet sitters; can you tell us about that?
 
Due to low standards, lack of ethics and no oversight in pet care, it’s led to gross negligence, often times death.  Early in 2015, I reached out to Assemblyman Troy Singleton for help.  My goal is to have a licensing and certification process implemented for pet sitters.  Assemblyman Singleton was accepted as a co-sponsor of Assembly Bill 2264, Bijou’s Law, and is expanding the Bill to include pet sitters.  Suggestions I provided above have been incorporated and I am hopeful the Bill shall be written into law to elevate the standard of care provided by all professional pet sitters and protect families’ property, personal belongings and precious pets.

How can someone reach you if they have questions?  Do you have a web site?  Are you on Facebook?

I’d love to hear from anyone who has questions!  My web site is http://www.IveGotTheScoop.net and My Facebook Page is http://www.Facebook.com/IveGotTheScoopLLC.

 



PetsitUSA Blog

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