On God and Google

This isn’t the first time my I-Phone has altered the course of things for me.  One of our supporters asked for my help on a cancer related issue and in my haste, I texted my reply as ‘At your service’ but autocorrect sent it as ‘At your cervix’.  

Sunday, I was on my way to the flagons, dragons, and wenches of the Renaissance Festival in Connecticut and when I typed in the address for it at 14 Stott Avenue, Google Maps autocorrected it for 14 Scott Street. 

And that took me to a place I’ve never been to before, but to a known yet forgotten land.

——–

The Saint Peters and Saint Paul Church sits atop a rolling Northeastern hillside in Norwich, and it was there I found the 14 stations of the Cross.  It’s a beautiful, bucolic place of pray and it’ll now and always be one of my just circles.  

I walked the grounds, reflected on its grace and glory and historical significance, wept for our loved ones lost by cancer, then got back in my car and carried on to the Renaissance festival.  

Our path isn’t up to us.  I forgot about that.  Shit.  I forgot about a lot of things.   But I just got reminded.  It’s up to Google.  And God.  

2 Dogs 2,000 Miles

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MEDFLAG 09: U.S. Army Africa Partnership strengthens ties with partners in Swaziland 090813

Check out these dental treat images:

MEDFLAG 09: U.S. Army Africa Partnership strengthens ties with partners in Swaziland 090813
dental treat

Image by US Army Africa
www.usaraf.army.mil

United States Army Africa

MEDFLAG 09: Partnership strengthens ties and friendships

By Staff Sgt. Lesley Waters
CJTF-HOA Public Affairs

MANZINI, Swaziland – Partnership was the key to success during MEDFLAG 09, a U.S. Army Africa exercise held this August that benefited thousands of people in Swazi villages.

That partnership was built on cooperation between the U.S. military and government of Swaziland, said Maj. Gen. William B. Garrett III, commander of U.S. Army Africa.

“Our pledge is to continue to serve side-by-side with our national and international partners to promote security, stability and peace in Africa, and of course in Swaziland,” Garrett said. “MEDFLAG 09 has been an important demonstration of our commitment to our African and partnered nations.”

The exercise included the Umbutfo Swaziland Defence Force, the Swaziland Ministry of Health, U.S. Army Africa and U.S. Africa Command.

Swazi medical staff got firsthand tips from U.S. medical officers. Meanwhile, the U.S. troops learned how to overcome the challenges to offering healthcare in rural African villages, Garrett said.

At a medical professional exchange, a dozen Swazi military and civilian medics took part in a seminar with U.S. medical officers – sharing ideas that build capacity to work together in the future. Through “first responder” mentoring, 25 Swazi medics from the USDF and the health ministry gained important tools that can help them in a crisis.

Overall, 16 Swazi medics, both military and civilians, took part in joint medical missions in local communities that helped Swazi people in need.

“Our Soldiers learned important lessons about how to operate in Africa, while the Swazi medical staff increased their capabilities through our interaction,” Garrett said. “As an added benefit, the people of Swaziland received quality care from this partnership effort.”

During the two-week exercise, roughly 2,400 medical and dental treatments were performed during visits to Swazi villages. At veterinary clinics, nearly 10,500 animals received treatment.

While in Swaziland, Garrett visited the joint U.S.-Swazi medical teams and spoke at the closing ceremony, held Aug. 14 at USDF headquarters.

“American and Swazi medics worked side-by-side to improve our readiness and enhance our ability to work together in combined medical operations,” Garrett said.
U.S. and Swazi teams carried out six veterinary civil assistance projects (VETCAPs), including a two-day visit to Hhohho Village in Zinyane Province, one-day at Shiselweni Village in Mkhwakhweni Province, one day at Manzini Village in Matufseni Province and a two-day visit in Lubombo Village in Maloma Province. During the VETCAPs, the veterinary team treated 6,792 cattle, 3,381 goats, 195 sheep, 195 dogs, one horse and one pig.

They also operated and successfully removed a benign tumor growing on the throat of a cow on the first day of VETCAPs.

“It was an unexpected surprise,” said U.S. Army Maj. Michael Simpson, of the Fort Dix, New Jersey-based 404th Civil Affairs Battalion, who was leading veterinary efforts during MEDFLAG 09. “Even though the tumor was benign it was near the throat. If it continued growing, it would have cut off the cow’s air passage and it would have suffocated.”

As the U.S. and Swazi veterinary teams treated the Swaziland livestock, medical and dental teams treated the local villagers.

The medical teams, which consisted of members from the 212th Combat Support Hospital, the U.S. Army Center for Health and Preventive Medicine and the 21st Sustainment Command, treated 1,519 patients during the six medical civil assistance projects (MEDCAPs).

“We saw patients who had everything from the basic cold to an elderly woman who had a goiter,” said 2nd Lt. Matthew McCreery, MEDFLAG 09’s executive officer.

The dental team, which consisted of members from the 920th Aeromedical Staging Squadron, Patrick AFB, Fla.; 59th Medical Wing, Wilford Medical Hall, Texas; and 212th CSH, treated 262 patients and extracted 273 teeth during the six dental civil assistance projects (DENCAPs).

“We were able to gain the trust of the Swazi villagers,” said Air Force Col. Dean Whitman, oral and maxillofacial surgeon. “Conducting these sorts of missions is important so the Swazis know we have good intentions and our primary concern is to help.”

During MEDFLAG 09, both U.S. and Swazi personnel conducted classes on disaster medical planning and operations, a mass casualty exercise and humanitarian and civic outreach to local communities. Classes included first responder familiarization, disaster relief, preventive medicine and tropical medicine.

“The health of the Swazi people and their livestock is clearly very important,” said U.S. Army Lt. Col. Michael Money, co-director of MEDFLAG 09. “It is our distinct privilege to have worked side-by-side with our new found friends from the USDF and the Ministry of Health, to deliver medical and veterinary care in all four regions of this beautiful land.”

Cleared for public release.

Photos by Air Force Staff Sgt. Lesley Waters. CJTF-HOA Public Affairs

PHOTO CAPTION: A member of a local drama group performs health education skits to villagers of Lubombo during the second of a two-day combined medical and dental civil assistance project (MEDCAP and DENCAP) as part of exercise MEDFLAG 09 in Lubombo Village, Swaziland on Aug. 13

The images are generally considered in the public domain. Request that credit be given to the U.S. Army and individual photographer.

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica

MEDFLAG 09: U.S. Army Africa Partnership strengthens ties with partners in Swaziland 090813
dental treat

Image by US Army Africa
www.usaraf.army.mil

United States Army Africa

MEDFLAG 09: Partnership strengthens ties and friendships

By Staff Sgt. Lesley Waters
CJTF-HOA Public Affairs

MANZINI, Swaziland – Partnership was the key to success during MEDFLAG 09, a U.S. Army Africa exercise held this August that benefited thousands of people in Swazi villages.

That partnership was built on cooperation between the U.S. military and government of Swaziland, said Maj. Gen. William B. Garrett III, commander of U.S. Army Africa.

“Our pledge is to continue to serve side-by-side with our national and international partners to promote security, stability and peace in Africa, and of course in Swaziland,” Garrett said. “MEDFLAG 09 has been an important demonstration of our commitment to our African and partnered nations.”

The exercise included the Umbutfo Swaziland Defence Force, the Swaziland Ministry of Health, U.S. Army Africa and U.S. Africa Command.

Swazi medical staff got firsthand tips from U.S. medical officers. Meanwhile, the U.S. troops learned how to overcome the challenges to offering healthcare in rural African villages, Garrett said.

At a medical professional exchange, a dozen Swazi military and civilian medics took part in a seminar with U.S. medical officers – sharing ideas that build capacity to work together in the future. Through “first responder” mentoring, 25 Swazi medics from the USDF and the health ministry gained important tools that can help them in a crisis.

Overall, 16 Swazi medics, both military and civilians, took part in joint medical missions in local communities that helped Swazi people in need.

“Our Soldiers learned important lessons about how to operate in Africa, while the Swazi medical staff increased their capabilities through our interaction,” Garrett said. “As an added benefit, the people of Swaziland received quality care from this partnership effort.”

During the two-week exercise, roughly 2,400 medical and dental treatments were performed during visits to Swazi villages. At veterinary clinics, nearly 10,500 animals received treatment.

While in Swaziland, Garrett visited the joint U.S.-Swazi medical teams and spoke at the closing ceremony, held Aug. 14 at USDF headquarters.

“American and Swazi medics worked side-by-side to improve our readiness and enhance our ability to work together in combined medical operations,” Garrett said.
U.S. and Swazi teams carried out six veterinary civil assistance projects (VETCAPs), including a two-day visit to Hhohho Village in Zinyane Province, one-day at Shiselweni Village in Mkhwakhweni Province, one day at Manzini Village in Matufseni Province and a two-day visit in Lubombo Village in Maloma Province. During the VETCAPs, the veterinary team treated 6,792 cattle, 3,381 goats, 195 sheep, 195 dogs, one horse and one pig.

They also operated and successfully removed a benign tumor growing on the throat of a cow on the first day of VETCAPs.

“It was an unexpected surprise,” said U.S. Army Maj. Michael Simpson, of the Fort Dix, New Jersey-based 404th Civil Affairs Battalion, who was leading veterinary efforts during MEDFLAG 09. “Even though the tumor was benign it was near the throat. If it continued growing, it would have cut off the cow’s air passage and it would have suffocated.”

As the U.S. and Swazi veterinary teams treated the Swaziland livestock, medical and dental teams treated the local villagers.

The medical teams, which consisted of members from the 212th Combat Support Hospital, the U.S. Army Center for Health and Preventive Medicine and the 21st Sustainment Command, treated 1,519 patients during the six medical civil assistance projects (MEDCAPs).

“We saw patients who had everything from the basic cold to an elderly woman who had a goiter,” said 2nd Lt. Matthew McCreery, MEDFLAG 09’s executive officer.

The dental team, which consisted of members from the 920th Aeromedical Staging Squadron, Patrick AFB, Fla.; 59th Medical Wing, Wilford Medical Hall, Texas; and 212th CSH, treated 262 patients and extracted 273 teeth during the six dental civil assistance projects (DENCAPs).

“We were able to gain the trust of the Swazi villagers,” said Air Force Col. Dean Whitman, oral and maxillofacial surgeon. “Conducting these sorts of missions is important so the Swazis know we have good intentions and our primary concern is to help.”

During MEDFLAG 09, both U.S. and Swazi personnel conducted classes on disaster medical planning and operations, a mass casualty exercise and humanitarian and civic outreach to local communities. Classes included first responder familiarization, disaster relief, preventive medicine and tropical medicine.

“The health of the Swazi people and their livestock is clearly very important,” said U.S. Army Lt. Col. Michael Money, co-director of MEDFLAG 09. “It is our distinct privilege to have worked side-by-side with our new found friends from the USDF and the Ministry of Health, to deliver medical and veterinary care in all four regions of this beautiful land.”
Cleared for public release.

Photos by Air Force Staff Sgt. Lesley Waters. CJTF-HOA Public Affairs

PHOTO CAPTION: U.S. Army Africa Commander Maj. Gen. William B. Garrett III talks with Army Capt. Charlie Pastor and Army Spc. Michelle Fiveash, U.S. service members participating in exercise MEDFLAG 09, during his visit of Lubombo Village on the second day of the combined medical and dental civil assistance project (MEDCAP and DENCAP) as part of exercise MEDFLAG 09 on Aug. 13.

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica

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Horse Recycles Complete Leg Magazine Collection

True American Dog

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Alternative Ways to Become a Member

Are you interested in becoming a member of PetsitUSA, but can’t spend the $ 45?  There are other ways to become a member.  PetsitUSA is looking for pet sitters that can get involved in blogging and social media in exchange for membership.  There have been other pet sitters who have taken this approach, but they have moved on.  If you are interested, contact PetsitUSA!


PetsitUSA Blog

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Style with a Vision

Today I’m teaming up with Nine West and VSP Direct to talk to you guys a little about how the right frames can complete any personal look when it comes to fashion (and how eyewear is the only fashion item for which you can get insurance!). I’ve mentioned a few times here on the blog that I am all sorts of near-sighted and wear glasses most of the time.  Thankfully, I love the look of a good, chic pair of specs and fully believe that they can make really great accessories.  Not so thankfully, my health insurance does not cover vision, and for many years, I’ve been forced to pay out of pocket for my exams, lenses and frames (which if you don’t already know are not cheap). 

Lucky for me, I recently signed up for VSP Direct.  Their individual vision insurance is super affordable, and gets you access to a large selection of frames from classic styles to modern, trendy ones (including dozens of top brand names – woohoo!).  Paying for glasses out of pocket can cost hundreds of dollars, and like I said before, glasses are truly the only fashion item that can be covered by insurance. So for me, it made perfect sense to take advantage. 

Here’s some more information on VSP Direct, in case you want to check them out (which you totally should):

1. They are the nation’s only not-for-profit vision care company, and they have spent a whole decade developing high-quality, affordable individual plans that are now available in every state.  Pretty impressive.
2. Know someone who needs vision care?  You can purchase VSP Direct insurance benefits for yourself or as a gift ( for as little as 41 cents a day or $ 16 a month!).  Love this idea.
3. Coverage includes the eye exam with a low co-payment, provides allowance for glasses or contacts (with fully covered lens options).
4. They have the lowest out-of-pocket cost in vision care with a typical annual savings of $ 227 (woot!).
5. They offer 30,000 providers, which makes them the largest doctor network in the industry.

A minimalist look featuring some of my favorite Nine West styles:  1. Black Nine West Frames  //  2. Tribeca Dome Leather Satchel  //  3. Tieler Boot  //  4. Bleeker Leather Card Hold  //  5. Beaded Hoop Earrings

One more thing…  Nine West and VSP Direct are currently hosting a ‘Style with a Vision’ Pinterest sweepstakes where you can win a Nine West shopping spree and a year of free vision care!  Yes please!

Do you wear glasses?  Does your healthcare cover vision, and if not, have you ever considered an individual eyewear insurance plan?

Thank you for supporting Bubby and Bean by allowing me to post occasional sponsored content. All sponsored posts feature products or services that I genuinely feel would be of interest to you. 
I
was selected for this opportunity as a member of Clever Girls Collective and the content and opinions expressed here are all my own.

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Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

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How NOT to Treat Temp Employees by Smart Resources Employment Agency

Smart Resources Temporary Staffing and Accountable Search: http://www.smartstaffing.com/index.html. Our funny take on exactly what we DON’T want to have happ…

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Press Release from AMC

AMC Awarded Research Grant From 2 Million Dogs Foundation

(New York, NY – September 17, 2013) 


The Animal Medical Center is proud to announce that it has been selected to receive an $ 80,000 research grant in comparative oncology by the 2 Million Dogs Foundation, an organization committed to discovering the common links between canine and human cancers and the causes of these cancers through comparative oncology research.

In dogs, transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common tumor of the urinary tract.  TCC typically presents at a very advanced stage and the majority of dogs diagnosed with this tumor are euthanized due to failure to control the local disease within the urinary tract.  Current therapies include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgical debulking but none are able to consistently produce lasting remissions.

The AMC research study being conducted in affiliation with Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center will be led by Dr. Chick Weisse, head of Interventional Radiology Service.  This study will compare systemic chemotherapy levels experienced by a canine patient following intravenous (typical route) versus intra-arterial (image-guided) routes of chemotherapy administration in the same patient.  

“At The AMC, recent advancements in interventional radiology techniques enable us to administer different drugs into the arteries feeding the actual tumors via minimally-invasive approaches – in order to achieve very high regional drug concentrations within the tumor – without the systemic side effects that would occur had these levels been administered  intravenously,” said Dr. Weisse.  The investigators hope to demonstrate higher achieved levels of chemotherapy within the targeted tissues as well as improved tumor remissions in canine patients with naturally occurring transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder and urethra.

“2 Million Dogs is proud to be working with the Animal Medical Center and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, two of the most prestigious institutions in comparative oncology,” said Ginger Morgan, Executive Director and President of the Board of 2 Million Dogs Foundation.

About 2 Million Dogs Foundation


2 Million Dogs Foundation is committed to discovering the common links between canine and human cancers and the causes of these cancers through comparative oncology research.  The organization will accomplish that mission through education and awareness, empowerment and mobilization and investment in research.  For more information:  http://www.2milliondogs.org

About The Animal Medical Center


The Animal Medical Center (AMC), located on the Upper East Side in New York City, is a non-profit veterinary center that has been a national leader in animal care since 1910. As an academic veterinary hospital, The AMC promotes the health and well-being of companion animals through advanced treatment, research and education. The AMC staff is comprised of over 100 veterinarians who utilize an interdisciplinary team approach combining expertise across specialty areas and services to care for your pet 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. For more information: http://www.amcny.org
——–

YBD’s Notes 1:  Chip Weisse, the principle investigator provided us with a Power Point Presentation that I wanted to share with you.  However, how to convert it  and post it here has been a serious pain in my arse, hence the delay.  


2 Dogs 2,000 Miles

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Getting Involved with Therapy Dogs

In recent news, service dogs have received much attention—for good reason. Following the tragic bombing at the Boston Marathon, the National Education for Assistance Dog Services (NEADS) established a new endowment to provide service dogs to anyone disabled by the marathon bombing. The victims, should they choose, may acquire a service dog in the future for necessary support.

This humanitarian effort has also inspired many other pet parents to certify their dogs for therapy purposes. Therapy dogs offer affection and periodic companionship to people in hospitals, various clinics, nursing homes, schools and disaster zones. They also help individuals with learning disabilities. Although a therapy dog certification may not be right for every canine, it’s a great option for dogs of all ages who meet certain temperament standards.

Who should consider certifying their dog?

Anyone who enjoys volunteering and owns a friendly dog would be a quality candidate. If you work long hours and frequently leave your dog alone at home, consider finding a pet sitter who is willing to go through the certification process with your dog. This way, you will give your canine much needed social interaction and training, while offering a service to your community.

 How can my dog achieve therapy dog status?

Some facilities offer in-service training, but more opportunities may be available if you and your dog obtain a professional certification. For example, Therapy Dog International (TDI) calls on both dogs and handlers to meet a number of requirements before attaining therapy dog status. Additionally, each handler/dog team must be certified independently, meaning the dog may work with multiple handlers during the process. Comprised of two phases, the process requires both the dog and handler(s) to complete 13 categorical tests.

Phase I

  • Test I: Grooming Examination – must meet hospital standards
  • Test II: Check-In – handler simulates filling out check-in paperwork, and a helper holds the dog in another room separately, away from the handler
  • Test III: Getting Around People – the dog must demonstrate control when navigating around people and must be able to handle when people approach
  • Test IV: Group Sit / Stay – the dog must be able to sit and stay when the handler moves to the end the leash
  • Test V: Group Down / Stay – same as test 4, however, the dog must be able to lie and remain in a down position
  • Test VII: Visiting With Patients – the dog must demonstrate control and willingness to be petted by other people

Phase II

  • Test VIII: Testing of Reactions to Unusual Situations – the dog must be able to follow the handler while exposed to situations that might occur while serving
  • Test IX: Leave It; Phase 1 – the handler must instruct the dog to leave a treat that is presented by a person on a walker while greeting them
  • Test X: Leave It; Phase 2 – the handler instructs the dog to leave a piece of food that is presented in its path
  • Test XI: Meeting Another Dog – the dog must demonstrate control while the handler converses with another person and their canine
  • Test XII: Entering Through a Door To Visit at the Facility – the handler must instruct the dog to sit, stand, lie down or stay before entering
  • Text XIV: Reaction to Children – the dog must demonstrate control and comfort when exposed to children

What do I do once my dog is certified?

When your dog completes the appropriate certification courses, you’ll want to find a local facility where you can put him or her to work. Most hospitals permit the services of therapy dogs. Contact a hospital’s volunteer office to learn about their therapy dog policy.

If you don’t wish to have your therapy dog participate in hospitals, you might consider contacting local schools, clinics and rehabilitation centers.

Furthermore, some certification programs aid in finding facilities that accept therapy dogs. They may provide a list of local organizations that recognize and accept their program certified dogs.

This was written by Kevin Cooper, who writes about pet-related topics, including how to find affordable dog insurance options and other news about ASPCA Pet Insurance. He also enjoys learning about trending pet-related news across the web.


PetsitUSA Blog

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Treat Yo Mama

Some cool treat images:

Treat Yo Mama
treat

Image by Rantz
And I don’t care what race or what colour or what creed
All that shit don’t bother me,
Only one thing that you should not forget ,
You gotta treat you mama with respect
And I don’t care what fashion the styling of you hair,
I don’t care about the car or the clothes you do wear.
Only one thing that you should not forget ,
You gotta treat yo mama with respect.

John Butler Trio

For Jay – may your recovery treat you kindly.

Dog Treats
treat

Image by BevKnits
I found this wicked cookie cutter for dog biscuits so I emailed Charlotte and she forwarded me the recipe for these cookies. The dogs LOVE them.

Here’s a link to Charlotte in NC blog with the doggie treat recipes:
thecharlatte.livejournal.com/189574.html

New treat
treat

Image by carterse
Emily and Katelyn find out just how much Ava and Kojak love these treats.

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The Combination Approach To Feeding Your Golden Retriever


Although you can get commercial food for your Golden Retriever, the ideal way to feed is to use a combination approach of both commercial food and fresh people foods. Most commercial food is good for your Golden, although it lacks nutrients and vitamins that fresh food has. Vets will tell you that fresh food is good, providing you don’t overdo it. Golden Retrievers love fresh food as well, as they can smell it a mile away. If it smells good to them – they’ll want it.

Most commercial foods will offer your Golden great sources of protein and vitamins, although fresh food contains far more essential sources. Chicken and meat for instance, have far more protein and minerals than any type of commercial dog food. Fish is another great choice, as it contains a lot of the protein your dog needs to maintain a healthy brain.

All dogs are well within the capacity of staying healthy, although you need to provide them with the minerals they need. Each dog is an individual, meaning that you can’t continue to feed him the same food on a daily basis. Golden Retrievers love people food, and they also love variety. What they need one day may vary the next, so you should always mix it up a bit and give them something different each day.

To be on the safe side, you should give your Golden a little bit of everything. This way, he will get everything he needs with his diet. When you design the diet for your growing Golden Retriever, you should always make sure to include animal protein. This is very important for your Golden, as he has to have it. Without animal protein, your dog will find himself literally struggling to stay healthy.

To keep your Golden Retriever healthy, it is very important that he gets quality nutrition. Although quality nutrition is very important, you should never him eat so much that he gains weight too fast. If you monitor his diet and know exactly what you are feeding him, he should remain in his weight class. Sometimes this can be hard to help though, especially if your Golden starts to develop allergies to a certain type of food.

If you ever have any questions regarding the diet of your Golden Retriever, you shouldn’t hesitate to ask your vet. Your vet could make some recommendations for you, even tell you the best type of commercial food for your dog. Depending on his individual needs, what he requires may be totally different than what another dog needs. As long as you keep your dog on a healthy diet and make sure he gets the food he needs – he should grow to be a healthy dog with plenty of energy.
Welcome to The Top Dog Blog!

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