Filled the final archery tag

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I went hunting this evening. I didn’t see anything until about 4:45, when I heard the leaves been churned up to my left. I have the left window on my blind zipped up, because that window points up in the woods where the deer can see me if I move. I have the blind right on a well-used game trail, and I knew it would be just a matter of time before the deer thrashing around in the brush to my left trotted out in front of me.

A little doe soon trotted out, and she was followed by a six-point buck.  He availed himself to me, and I took the shot. I aimed for the heart, but I he must have moved just as I pulled the trigger on the crossbow.But the rage broadhead still went through his heart. He ran less than a hundred feet before he dropped.

011

As my dad and I dragged him out of the brush, we came across a big ten-point that was tracking the doe that the six point had been tending. While dad went to get the tractor, the big buck came back and circled me. I snort-wheezed at him, and he stopped and tried to wind me for a few minutes. He then marched into the nearest thicket and began rubbing his antlers against the trees. I had taken out a little weenie that he’d have to beat up tonight.

I can’t go deer hunting again until Thanksgiving week, when the rifle season comes in.

So the big one is safe.

But this is still a nice little buck.

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Natural History

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Pet Food Recall: The Natural Dog Company, Inc. Recalls 12″ Tremenda Sticks

The latest recall is from the FDA.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – July 20, 2015 – Windsor, CO – The Natural Dog Company, Inc. of Windsor, CO, is recalling its 12oz bags of 12″ Tremenda Sticks pet chews because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella. Salmonellacan affect animals eating the product and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

The recalled 12″ Tremenda Sticks were distributed to retail stores in CA, CO, FL, IL, MO MT, NC, OH UT and WA.

The recalled product comes in a 12oz bag without a lot number or expiration date with UPC number: 851265004957. Products with new packaging, which includes both a lot number and expiration date but the same UPC are not affected by this recall.

No illnesses have been reported to date in connection with this problem.

The potential for contamination was noted after a Colorado Department of Agriculture inspection of the product revealed the presence of Salmonella in a sample taken from a 12oz package of 12″ Tremenda Sticks.

Production of the product has been suspended while FDA and the company continue their investigation as to the source of the problem.

Consumers who have purchased 12oz packages of 12″ Tremenda Sticks should discontinue use of the product and may return the unused portion to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 1-888-424-4602 – Monday to Friday 9am to 5pm MST.


PetsitUSA Blog

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You wouldn’t feed your dog or cat hair, would you… knowingly, that is!

Four pet foods tested…  all four positive for hair!!!

Photo Credit:  TruthAboutPetFood.com Photo Credit: TruthAboutPetFood.com

Those foods were:

  • Pedigree Adult Complete Nutrition Chicken Flavor

  • 9 Lives Plus Care Cat Food

  • Beneful Incredibites with Real Beef Dog Food

  • Friskies Indoor Delights Cat Food

Read the full story  and unfortunately, disgusting photos and video… 

Source of all info is credited to: TruthAboutPetFood.com

Helping to keep beloved furry babies healthy and safe… and pet parents informed!

Lori

I’ve Got the ‘Scoop’!, LLC

www.IveGotTheScoop.net

2015 Best Pet Sitter & Dog Walker in Burlington County, Voted Best of 2015 Burlington County Times

2015 National Pet Sitting Business of the Year Recipient, Awarded by NAPPS


PetsitUSA Blog

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Trick or Treat with Brody One Ear!

A special day calls for a special ear. And a poem, of course.

b11

Trick or treat!

b15

I lick feet.

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Give me something that has meat!

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If you don’t, just beware-

b12

I’ll eat up your underwear!

 

Have a great day and be safe all! I get to go see Danny Elfman perform the Nightmare Before Christmas tonight at the Hollywood Bowl so I’ve got Jack Skellington on the mind 😀

Pawcurious: With Veterinarian and Author Dr. V

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The Mindy Project’s Ike Barinholtz Promotes Pet Adoption

As Nurse Morgan Tookers on the comedy series The Mindy Project he’s known for being doggedly devoted to his many canine companions, and in real life actor Ike Barinholtz has shown his affection…



[[ This is a summary only. Click the title for the full post, photos, videos, giveaways, and more! ]]


DogTipper

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Nighty-Night, Sleep Tight

I love both the picture and the sentiment here. Until next time, Good day, and good dog!


Doggies.com Dog Blog

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Reflections on 4000 Miles

Divers have to decompress before resurfacing and the greater the depth of the dive the longer the decompression. I’ve pretty much been unplugged and down and out right disconnected since the completion of the West Coast Walk because I needed to.  
But I haven’t just been making angels in the tons of snow that’s blanketed CT – tho Hudsy and Nanners (nice snow stache BTW) have – I’ve been deep in reflection on the enormity my accomplishments but more importantly how to tell it.  The right way.  
The story’s the thing.  
Beginning March 16th, the 7th anniversary of the start of the first walk, I’ll be posting a seven part interview with Yer Big Dog wherein which I will talk not only about the great and the glory of this grand adventure but the trials and tribulations, too.  From the fantastic people we’ve met on our path to the fantastical things we’ve experienced.  
And we’re making it interactive.  I’ve gotten thousands of questions over the expanse of our journey and haven’t always been able to answer all of them so also we’re opening this up to you.  If you have something you’d like to personally ask YBD, send me an email by Feb 15th.  Not via FB or TW or in a comment here.  Hopefully we can get it and we’ll try our best because I have a lot to say.  Over 4,000 miles and 1,044 days, I’ve walked the walk now it’s time to talk the talk.  #4000miles

THE JOURNEY CONTINUES

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California’s End of Life Option Act and How it Would have Changed Mom’s Death

In 2014, a young, vibrant woman named Brittany Maynard moved from the home in California she had known all her life so that she could die on her own terms in Oregon. Diagnosed with glioblastoma, arguably one of the most monstrous forms of cancer in this world, Maynard was willing to uproot her life, put her face out into the world, and share a most intimate decision with a universe of strangers in order to help people understand why someone might make the decision to hasten their death.

With little fanfare and no more than a small sidebar in the local newspaper, California has just become the fifth state to legalize assisted death for terminally ill patients. When I read it, on a plane on my way to deliver a talk on how we deal with death in our culture, I cried. I cried for Maynard, and for my mother (seen here on the left at last year’s Fourth of July bash), and for me.

June28th 4th @ Santa Luz 110

Like so many others, I was transfixed with Maynard’s bravery in opening herself up to scrutiny and criticism. I put myself in her place and wondered what I would have done in the same situation. As a veterinarian who routinely helps people gently end the lives of pets suffering from terminal disease, the idea is not as challenging to me as it is to many. Especially with brain cancer- something that can rob you of the essence of who you are, turn you into someone else, snaking its way without order or reason through your control panel until your body can no longer hang on.

It is, to me, one of the most petrifying propositions out there.

So when my own young and vibrant mother was diagnosed with the very same cancer not five months after Maynard’s death, I fell to my knees and cried with grief, with anger, and above all with terror. For we, too, live in California, and my mother’s delicate health by the time she was diagnosed did not allow us the luxury of moving anywhere. Three weeks before her diagnosis, she was hiking though Red Rock. Three weeks after, she was bedbound. It happened that quickly.

_MG_0056

My entire family was focused on my dear Aunt Michele’s mobility, and no one knew what was brewing with my Mom.

I found myself preoccupied with fear for my mother, and worry about what I might do if her pain and suffering were unable to be controlled. Hospice and palliative care is excellent, but even that has its limits. People I thought were my friends sent me all sorts of horror stories they have heard about this cancer, expressing remorse at the news and the hope that my mother, ever so dignified, would not be one who would lose it all in the fugue of neoplasia.

I am really good at delivering an easy death. I have access to drugs no one else can get, and they are remarkable. We can give them to dogs and cats and rats and horses, but not to people. People have to ride it out on cocktails with middling degrees of efficacy. Our own perceptions make it worse: more than half of palliative care professionals have been accused of “euthanasia or murder” by providing adequate palliation to dying people, because euthanasia for a pet is mercy but for a human is dastardly. We have a long way to go in how we think of these things.

Fearing the Loss of Control

Instead of concentrating on my time with my mother, I spent most of it worrying- what would I do if the meds stopped working? How would I respond if she asked me to help her die? How could I refuse? How could I say yes? I had no reassurance that the necessary tools to control the situation were in my toolbox, and that took away from so many little moments I wish I could have back.

In the end, my mother’s cancer took mercy on her. She died quickly, as she wished, and never once complained of pain. She forgot things, felt sleepy, and drifted off oh so gently into that good night. It was a blessing, strange as it sounds. She willed herself to progress the way she wanted.

Had we been given access to life ending drugs, she would likely have filled the prescription.

Had she filled the prescription, secure in the knowledge that she had some control, she would not have taken them. There is no doubt in my mind. She didn’t need them. It doesn’t change my mind one bit as to their necessity, doesn’t make me any less inclined to cheer this new law and fight any who would seek its appeal. It would not have changed the medicine, but it would have changed the emotion, the fear, and the terror.

Because it’s not the inevitability of the outcome that matters in these situations, it’s the little bits of control we are given in times where so much of it has been taken away.

And that would have changed so much.

 

Pawcurious: With Veterinarian and Author Dr. V

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Lyme disease forces cancelation of all Julie Ruin tour dates

Lyme disease forces cancelation of all Julie Ruin tour dates
Announcing the news through their Facebook page, the band stated that they are, “ridiculously sad” with the situation, but Hanna's doctors have advised her to begin a three month course of treatment beginning immediately. Due to this reality, she would
Read more on Death and Taxes

The man who crushed the Keystone XL pipeline
Russ Mezikofsky. WHOSE WOODS ARE THESE? McKibben, photographed during an unseasonably warm winter, lives on Vermont land once owned by poet Robert Frost. On November 6, 2011, Bill McKibben arrived at Washington, D.C.'s, Lafayette Park to …
Read more on The Boston Globe

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An Open Confession to Every Vet Tech I’ve Ever Worked With

Dear Amazing Veterinary Technicians of the World,

It’s sad that you only get one week to celebrate you and all that you do. The unsung heroes, the client counselors, absorbers of abuse, veterinary emotional support offerers, and in general people without whom these clinics would fall to pieces.

I’d like to offer to you this week an open apology for the transgressions of my past years.

  1. I ate the last M&M. I’m sorry. I know now you probably hadn’t eaten in 12 hours and really needed it. I also know you figured it out and let it slide.
  2. I actually wasn’t being helpful when I said I would clean that kennel. Thanks for being gracious. I saw you go back in later and do it correctly.
  3. When you couldn’t hit a vein and asked me to and I said “Try again! Practice makes perfect!” that was only because I knew if you couldn’t hit it, there was no way I could.
  4. I now know that your gentle suggestions are not really suggestions. I should have listened the first 15 times you were right.
  5. If it were not for you I would have walked into 45 exam rooms with my sunglasses on top of my head.
  6. When I left the room after that really hard euthanasia to “see my next appointment,” I went into the back to cry and left you alone with that sweet elderly lady because you were better at this stuff that me.
  7. For all the times you took care of me and looked out for my mental well-being, I rarely did the same for you. If I did, it wasn’t enough.

tech

These days I work solo, and to be honest every day I head out I wonder to myself if I couldn’t come up with a business model that allows me to have you along. Because I need you. As I sit in a living room looking in horror at a vein that will not cooperate, I need you.

When I see a little kid making a beeline for the syringes and I only have two hands when I need three, I need you.

When there is a mess and I need to be graceful and take care of it with no one noticing instead of asking the owners if they have any paper towels, I need you.

When it’s been a rough afternoon and I could use a friend to talk to, I need you.

Click here to view the embedded video.

You all are the heartbeat of the clinic. Thank you.

Pawcurious: With Veterinarian and Author Dr. V

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