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Sunflower Faith

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Secrets of sled dogs and why human athletes should be jealous

One of the more ignorant assertions by the animal rights morons people is that Iditarod dogs are beaten, starved and forced to run hundreds of miles. The fact is that every racing sled dog consumes around 12,000 calories daily, food that the musher must prepare and have flown to the various checkpoints of the race. That is the caloric equivalent of 25 Big Macs every day of racing. Yet the dogs weigh only 40-60 pounds….
The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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Despite cold, Irish eyes smile in Lake George

Smiling summer dog
dog smile

Image by Jennie Faber
Munch perched on a picnic bench at Wanless Park, surveying the decrepitude that’s been the result of nearly month-long city workers’ strike here in Toronto.

Munch has offered to graze on the grass and retrieve garbage, but CUPE 79 has warned that doing the job of striking workers undermines their bargaining position.

Despite cold, Irish eyes smile in Lake George
LAKE GEORGE — Shamrocks and other Irish-themed attire could be seen in full force at Sunday's St. Patrick's parade in Lake George — even on dogs. Village resident Joanne Morrison was walking her Boston terrier Ross and her border collie Scout along 
Read more on Glens Falls Post-Star

'Justified' postmortem: AJ Buckley talks Danny's showdown with Raylan
He just had the biggest smile on his face. It's the time we're gonna finally see Danny square off with a real shooter, and then I f–kin' fall down my dog's hole and impale myself with my own knife. It's so redneck. (Laughs) I'm like, if there was ever
Read more on Entertainment Weekly (blog)

Dog rescued from breeding hell nominated for bringing smiles to older people
RESCUE dog Zoe regularly visits Denville Hall Care Home in Ducks Hill Road, Northwood, and has been nominated in the Friends for Life category at Crufts 2014. The competition celebrates heart-warming tales in which dogs have truly earned their title as 
Read more on getwestlondon

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Some People Need to Steal Content, Because They Can’t Create Their Own

Are you reading this post on a site like fortiflorafordogs.com,basixsupplements.com, or tranquiltabs.com?

That’s because there’s someone that can’t create content of his own and has to steal it from blogs like dogspelledforward.com in order to fill his site with content, in a lame attempt to sell pet medications via affiliate links.

If you are reading it on a site like this, you can read the actual posts here, instead of on the site of a thief.

If you are reading this on my actual site or in RSS, I apologize. I just wanted to get a post calling these leeches out onto their sites, since their theft is completely automated.

Some People Need to Steal Content, Because They Can’t Create Their Own is a post written by . You can see the actual post at Dog Training in Bergen County New Jersey


Dog Spelled Forward Website and Blog

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HALO-SPONSORED SHELTER ME AIRS IN MICHIGAN AND OHIO THIS WEEK

Shelter_Me_EdieSHELTER ME: Second Chances” the 3rd episode in the series sponsored by Halo, Purely for Pets premiers on PBS.

SHELTER ME: Second Chances” is the 3rd episode hosted by Edie Falco in the inspiring series about shelter pets improving people’s lives. The 1st episode Shelter Me was hosted by actress Katherine Heigl and the 2nd episode “SHELTER ME: Let’s Go Home” was hosted by Jane Lynch; all three hosts are animal advocates.

Shelter Me is about helping others and making a difference. They focus on the success stories to bring more people into the shelters to give these incredible animals a second chance.

Here is this week’s airing schedule:

MICHIGAN:
Marquette: WNMU
Monday, March 17 at 10pm.

OHIO:
Athens: WOUB
Tuesday, March 18 at 11pm.

Click here for the complete Episode Three Broadcast Schedule – 2014 Schedule

Halo

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Latest Greenies Chicken News

THAT'S LIFE: Unlocking the bush
(Possibly a chicken first before Googling it.) A greenie will probably call it a dead duck due to their pessimism about humanity's relationship to nature. (Possibly a migratory masked lapwing duck, because greenies know this stuff.) A redneck will
Read more on Newcastle Herald

Agency: Oil, gas rules will bring 'historic' pollution improvements
Listening to the “greenies” you would think we are getting worse, not better. We are fast Talk about Chicken Littles—its the oil and gas lobbyists that claim any improvement in public health and safety will somehow doom the world's richest
Read more on Grand Junction Sentinel

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Lacey on Things

Every month the Lethbridge Photography Club has a photo theme. Anyone who is interested, enters a photo and they will critique it for you. It can be a great opportunity to learn but it can also be an opportunity to stretch your wings a bit. I usually enter a photo from my archives but this time, I couldn’t think of one that would fit the theme.

The theme this month is “Balance”. I’m pretty sure the intention is something more along the lines of compositional balance but I get to interpret it however I want and when I think of balance, the first thing that comes to mind is Maddie on Things. Maddie is amazing and I decided to see if I could get Lacey to balance on something. I scrolled through some of Maddie’s photos looking for inspiration. In many of the photos she is pretty high up but I knew I didn’t want to do anything that risky.  But then I saw one of her on top of a Nutella jar. So I decided to see if I could get Lacey on top of a peanut butter jar.

I thought I had 12 days to teach Lacey to get on a perch and Amanda assured me it could be done. I had my doubts. Turns out I only had 5 days (I had my meeting dates mixed up)! If I had known that when I started, I wouldn’t have even tried so I’m glad I didn’t know!

The first session was a disaster. I had a little plastic step-stool that I placed on the ground in front of me and tried to lure Lacey on it. She basically did everything she could to avoid it. Lol. She stood up like a gopher, she hopped around it, she leaned and stretched and contorted. The only way I could get her to touch it was to physically place her feet on it myself.

So that night I tried again but this time I started with a large step-stool that sits at the base of a chair she often hops up on. On that stool, she hopped up no problem.  I then tried again with the plastic one (about 1/3 the size)  and she finally put her front two feet on it quite willingly.

By Thursday afternoon she was putting all 4 feet on the plastic step-stool. By Friday afternoon she was putting all 4 feet on a small bucket I have. I was amazed at her progress.

Friday I went shopping for peanut butter. The largest jar I could find was 2 kg and the size of the lid was about 1/2 the size of the bucket. Gulp. I wasn’t even sure all her feet could fit at once but we tried. It wobbled. A lot. I couldn’t even brace it with my feet. It didn’t take her long to completely stop trying.

Hmmmm. I found a bowl with a base the size of the jar. I turned it upside down and voila!  She got on it no problem. So I knew she could do the jar if we could figure out how to brace it.

Saturday, Marlin and I did some brainstorming. I decided to empty out the jar and screw it down to a sheet of plywood. It was still a bit wiggly, but it wasn’t going to fall over. We practiced on Saturday and only got as far as 3 feet up but it was after a long walk so I was hoping she was just tired.

We went out bright and early this morning and… Ta Da!!!!

Crazy Coulee and Little Lacey

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WALK 2: The Route

WEST COAST WALK ROUTE
Launch Date:  May 10th, 2014
Launch Location:  Peace Arch Park Vancouver BC





Vancouver BC to Everett WA:
Route: 543 to Portal Way
            Vista to Hovander
            West Smith to Pacific Highway
            Northwest Ave to Samish Way
            Hwy 99 to Cedardale Rd
            Pacific Hwy to Hwy 99
Distance: 90 miles.  Estimated Week of Arrival (WOA): May 18th
Everett WA to Seattle WA
Route: Hwy 99
Distance: 30 miles.  Estimated WOA: May 18th
Seattle WA to Tacoma WA
Route: Hwy 99
Distance: 35 miles.  Estimated WOA: May 25th
Route Tacoma WA to Portland OR
Route: Hwy 7 to Hwy 507
Distance:  155 miles .  Estimated WOA: June 8th
Portland OR to Otis OR
Route: Hwy 99 W
Distance: 85 miles.  Estimated WOA: June 15th
Otis OR to Gardiner OR
Routes for Remainder of the Walk: Hwy 101 and Hwy 1
Distance:  100 miles.  Estimated WOA: June 22nd
Gardiner OR to North Bend OR
Distance 30 miles.  Estimated WOA: June 29th
North Bend to Brookings OR
Distance: 110 miles.  Estimated WOA: July 6th
Brookings OR to Eureka CA
Distance: 115 miles.  Estimated WOA: July 20th
Eureka CA to Loleta CA*
Distance: 15 miles.  Estimated WOA: July 27th
Loleta CA to Garberville CA*
Distance: 65 miles. Estimated WOA: August 3rd
Garberville CA to Fort Bragg CA*
Distance: 70 miles. Estimated WOA: August 10th
Fort Bragg CA to San Francisco
Distance: 175 miles. Estimated WOA: September 1st
San Francisco to Carmel
Distance: 120 miles. Estimated WOA: September 14th
Carmel to Santa Barbara CA
Distance: 230 miles. Estimated WOA: October 1st**
Santa Barbara CA to LA
Distance: 110 miles. Estimated WOA: October 12th**
LA to San Diego CA
Distance: 125 miles. Estimated WOA: October 26th
San Diego CA to Border
Distance: 15 miles.  Estimated Date for Arrival Party:  Weekend of November 1st
TOTAL ESTIMATED MILEAGE: 1,675 miles

*Some areas of Hwy 101 don’t seem to be open to pedestrians. Alternative route may be necessary

2 Dogs 2,000 Miles

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Side Effects of Rimadyl in Dogs

In the past you may have seen television commercials showing previously lame dogs jumping and running about like young puppies. These commercials were promoting Rimadyl, a drug introduced in 1997 by Pfizer Chemical for the treatment of hip dysplasia and arthritis in dogs. What the commercials carefully avoided was any mention of the side effects of Rimadyl in dogs.

Today it’s no longer possible to see those commercials because the advertising was halted by Pfizer for good reasons. As a dog owner, we are indebted to dogs like Montana, a six-year-old Siberian husky who had stiff legs. Montana was prescribed Rimadyl by his veterinarian and at first the drug appeared to work well. But then Montana lost his appetite, wobbled when he walked, and finally was unable to walk at all. He began vomiting and had seizures; eventually his owner was forced to put him to sleep. An autopsy was performed which showed the presence of liver damage that could only be associated with a harmful drug reaction.

Drugs for pets are big business in the United States, as well as in many other countries where pet animals are valued. It is estimated that world-wide, the sale of these drugs total more than 3-1/2 Billion dollars annually. Rimadyl is one of the bestselling drugs included in this estimate.

Rimadyl has been prescribed for more than four million dogs in the United States alone, and has earned Pfizer tens of millions of dollars. After introducing the drug, the company ran full-page magazine ads and a public-relations campaign that resulted in 1,785 print stories, 856 radio reports and more than 200 television news reports of the benefits of Rimadyl. What dog owner whose beloved pet was suffering from arthritis or hip dysplasia wouldn’t want such a “miracle drug” for their pet?

But Rimadyl has also resulted in many debates and intense arguments between veterinarians and pet owners who were furious that they were not warned of the risks of giving their pets Rimadyl.

After Montana’s owner contacted Pfizer and the Food and Drug Administration to complain about the early and untimely death of her dog, Pfizer offered to pay her $ 440 in what they called “a gesture of good will.” Today we can be thankful that Montana’s owner was insulted by Pfizer’s offer and their lawyers’ stipulation that she tell no one about the payment (or bribe as some would call it). She refused to sign any of Pfizer’s proffered documents and would not accept any money. She felt it was an affront both to her and to the memory of Montana to absolve Pfizer of any blame.

As additional reports of serious reactions and the deaths of many dogs started pouring into the FDA, the agency recommended that Pfizer list “death” as a possible side effect in a warning letter to veterinarians and also place a warning on the drug labels. Pfizer indicated this “would be devastating to the product” and after much stalling, eventually was forced to put the word “death” on Rimadyl’s labels and notify all veterinarians in writing.

The strongest blow to Pfizer’s inappropriate labeling and advertising was the FDA’s requirement that they mention the same warning on their television ads. When given an ultimatum about their commercials mentioning “death” or else pulling the ads, Pfizer chose to stop all television ads for Rimadyl. Although this came too late to save the life of Montana, he and his owner should be credited with bringing pressure to bear on the FDA and Pfizer and forcing them to begin warning of the possible serious side effects of Rimadyl.

Since the introduction of Rimadyl in 1997, the FDA has received reports of more than 1,000 dogs that died or had to be put to sleep, and 7,000 more that had serious adverse reactions after taking the drug.

Despite these serious side effects, the FDA has not ordered the removal of Rimadyl from the marketplace. The FDA requires safety and efficacy testing for animal drugs just as it does for human drugs. However, animal drug tests are conducted with a much smaller number of test subjects. Pfizer used about 500 dogs in their trials of Rimadyl, which is less than one fifth the number of subjects used in most human-drug trials. During Pfizer’s Rimadyl trials, some dogs developed unusual liver-function readings and one young beagle tested on a high dose of the drug died.

Neither the FDA or Pfizer found these effects alarming, and the drug was subsequently approved. A consumer group has mounted a campaign against Pfizer called BARKS, which stands for ”Be Aware of Rimadyl’s Known Side-effects.” Hopefully this organization will be able to influence more dog owners to carefully consider very seriously whether or not to have Rimadyl prescribed for their pet dog.

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Assisi Veterinary Hospital Offers Deal for Pet Dental Care Month

Malverne, NY (PRWEB) February 12, 2014

February is Pet Dental Care Month and Assisi Veterinary Hospital is celebrating by offering 25 percent off on dental care for pets. Pet owners can stop in to Assisi Veterinary Hospital on Hempstead Avenue in Malverne and ask about the discount on dentistries (scale and polish only, x-rays and extractions additional).

Most pet owners are aware of the importance of diet, exercise and vaccines when it comes to their pets, however, most neglect to understand the importance of a pet?s dental health. Veterinarians find that one of the most common health problems in pets is periodontal disease. Veterinarians estimate that as many as 80 percent of dogs and 70 percent of cats will suffer from periodontal disease by the age of 3.

The veterinarians at Assisi Veterinary Hospital want to stress the importance to pet owners of brushing their pet?s teeth regularly. Only 1 percent of pet owners claim to brush their pet?s teeth regularly. Brushing and the use of chew toys and treats will keep pets healthy and help lower overall veterinary costs. Brushing can also prevent dental infections in pets from spreading to organs such as the kidneys and heart.

The professionals at Assisi Veterinary Hospital take pet dental care very seriously. They understand that oral hygiene is a crucial part of maintaining a long and healthy life for pets. Take advantage of the opportunity for 25 percent off pet dental care throughout the month of February and stop in to Assisi Veterinary Hospital or call 516-256-0022 to make an appointment.

About the company:

Assisi Veterinary Hospital is a full-service, state-of-the-art facility offering the very best in high-quality care for all pets? needs. With their fully-licensed, caring and kindhearted staff, they will care for pets as if they were their own. The animal hospital boasts a staff of more than 18 fully-trained professionals. Assisi also offers services such as pet boarding and pet grooming. For more information, please visit their website at http://www.assisivh.com.







Related Dog Oral Care Press Releases

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