Latest Oral Hygiene News

Oral Hygiene Smurf – Back
oral hygiene

Image by Jacobunny

Make dental hygiene fun
that's meaningful to him to reinforce good dental hygiene. 2 Play the. brushing game. Time how long to brush each section of the mouth (front, back, top of teeth, tongue and gums) or play Simon Says to model good oral care behavior and ensure kids .
Read more on OCRegister (subscription)

Olympic Athletes Bomb on Oral Hygiene
Olympic athletes are at the top of their game when it comes to their physique, but not so much for oral hygiene. New research from the British Journal of Sports Medicine reveals that elite athletes tend to have more cavities, tooth erosion and gum
Read more on TIME

Survey reveals poor oral hygiene habits in UAE
DUBAI: A new survey on the oral hygiene habits of the UAE residents has found that almost half of those surveyed only visit their dentist for oral healthcare when in pain and over twenty percent only visit their dentist once each year. Following the
Read more on Gulf Today

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HealthyPetNet listing renewed in GreenPeople.org

This listing has consistently provided very loyal customers who are interested in doing everything they can for their pets, including adding high quality fish oil to their diets. They provide stats and show that since Mar 31, 2007:

  • 1477 people viewed your listing.
  • 493 clicked through to your website.

To have 1/3 of the people who see an ad click through to it is really impressive.

What’s cool about this directory is that they’re for real. In order to list a pet food with them, you have to meet the following criteria, and of course, HealthyPetNet qualifies:

CRITERIA FOR LISTING ACCEPTANCE
Disallowed ingredients include : Animal Grade Animals (too sick/diseased for Human Consumption), By-products (feet, bones and intestines, etc.), Fillers (weeds, hulls or chaff), Meat meal, Bone meal, Rendered fats, GMO ingredients, Chemical preservatives (BHA, BHT, ethoxyquin), Sugar, Propylene glycol, Ethylene glycol.
Product Ingredients :
Meat, Chicken, Eggs : Any meat, chicken or eggs must be organic or at least from free ranged animals.

  • GreenPeople averages over 11,000 visitors per day
  • alexa.com shows Traffic Rank for greenpeople.org: 93,743 (1/06)
  • Google page ranks is a 6-7 out of 10 (and 1,110 sites link to us)
  • linkpopularity.com shows- AltaVista says 1018 sites link to GreenPeople.- HotBot says 1189 sites link to GreenPeople.

You can post free ads or you can post a variety of paid ads and banners. I usually pay for an annual Premier Green Star listing which includes a clickable URL ($ 29.95 per year).

A day in the life of a HealthyPetNet Rep

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Bath Path Lavender Bath Salts #Giveaway! ~ Ends 10/31

Bath Path Lavender Bath Salts Giveaway
Mommy and Baby Reviews has teamed up with Bath Path Bath Salts for an amazing giveaway!
Bath Path
THREE Winners will receive an Amazon Gift Code for a FREE jar of Bath Salts! A retail value of $ 15.97!
Lavender is one of my favorite scents. It has such a refreshing smell. I always have Lavender in my bedroom and now to have it in my bath, how wonderful!!
Giveaway opens October 22, 2013 at NOON EST. and will close October 31, 2013 at 11:59 pm EST.
All winners will be notified by email and have 48 hours to respond and claim their prize.
Ready for your chance to win?? Enter below!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 ****Disclaimer: Must be 18 years of age or older to enter. Open to US residents only. Mommy and Baby Reviews and all participating blogs are not responsible for prize shipment. Bath Path will provide three winners with an Amazon Gift Code to redeem their prizes. Winners will have 48 hours to respond to the winning email to claim their prize. If a winner should fail to reply they will forfeit their prize and another winner will be selected. This giveaway is in no way affiliated with Twitter, Facebook, Amazon or Pinterest. Void where prohibited****

 siggy


LoveMy2Dogs

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Frank Zappa 1971 12 04 Magdalena – Dog Breath

Live at Montreux Casino, Switzerland.

Her name is Ringo (Ringer), and she can process more oxygen than a Ford V-8.
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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Eagle Ruins Dinner

True American Dog

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Pet Food Handling Safety

There are many steps you can take when handling pet foods and treats to help prevent foodborne illness, including Salmonella-related illness.

Salmonella in pet foods and treats can cause serious infections in your pets and in people too, especially children, older people, and those with compromised immune systems. Salmonella can inadvertantly be transferred to people handling the contaminated products.

Pet owners and consumers can also help reduce the likelihood of infection from contaminated pet foods and treats by following safe handling instructions:

Buying

- Purchase products in good condition, without signs of damage to the packaging such as dents or tears.

Preparation

- Wash your hands for 20 seconds with hot water and soap before and after handling pet foods and treats.

- Wash pet food bowls, dishes, and scooping utensils with soap and hot water after each use.

- Do not use the pet’s feeding bowl as a scooping utensil—use a clean, dedicated scoop or spoon.

- Dispose of old or spoiled pet food products in a safe manner, such as in a securely tied plastic bag in a covered trash receptacle.

Storage

- Refrigerate promptly or discard any unused, leftover wet pet food. Refrigerators should be set at 40º F.

- Dry products should be stored in a cool, dry place—under 80º F.

- If possible, store dry pet food in its original bag inside a clean, dedicated plastic container with a lid, keeping the top of the bag folded closed.

- Keep pets away from food storage and preparation areas.

- Keep pets away from garbage and household trash.

Important Information About Feeding Your Dog

Dog Food Comparisons

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The Dog Food Comparison Blog

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Cool Tooth images

Check out these tooth images:

OMG 1st Teeth!!
tooth

Image by chippenziedeutch
We call them the Wedding Teeth

Dental X-rays: my left side teeth
tooth

Image by jcolman
Dental X-rays: my left side teeth.

Mike’s soon-to-be-gone wisdom teeth
tooth

Image by hitormiss
Jeff and I are at the Duplex, wishing a bon voyage to Mike‘s wisdom teeth, which are being removed tomorrow at 9am. Mike suggested taking a photo of them for posterity, so Jeff held my keychain flashlight while I took this photo with my Treo.

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Deputies Stop a Dog Fight, and a Suspect Is Bitten in the Melee

In the official taxonomy of boneheadedness, there are two primary types: being boneheaded by virtue of stupidity, and being boneheaded by malice. And then, there are the cases that crank the boneheadedness up to 11 by combining the two.

People who run or attend dog fights usually fall into the last category of boneheads. (At least, that’s the language we use when the kids are around.) Dogfighting is a malicious and ugly kind of abuse that requires about three brain cells. And while I’m never happy to be writing up any kind of article about a dog fight, the recent case of a bust in South Carolina at least has the compensation of some charmingly poetic justice.

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Barking dog by Shutterstock.

Early Saturday morning in Effingham, South Carolina, sheriff's deputies came across a dog fight that was about to start in an empty field. A perimeter had already been set up with two Pit Bulls facing off. When the deputies arrived, the organizers and audience immediately tried to flee, heading for the nearby woods. At least one of the dogs didn't seem quite so keen on letting them go: Sheriff Kenney Boone said on his Facebook page that one of the dogs "escaped ... after attacking and bringing down one of the fleeing suspects."

The deputies arrested eight men, and in addition to the remaining dog, deputies seized three guns, some cocaine, marijuana, and a little more than $ 2,800 in cash.

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The captured dog, caged at Florence County Environmental Services.

As of now, there are no reports of the escaped dog being caught. The fate of the dog who was brought in is still uncertain, but for now, he's recovering comfortably at Florence County Environmental Services. Herbie Christmas, of Environmental Services, told SCNow that the dog has lacerations on his face and neck and may have a broken leg, but otherwise is very friendly.

"I saw him at 6 a.m.," Christmas said. "He was wagging his tail and even came to the fence and licked my hand. But actually, animals that are bred to fight don't usually show aggression toward humans, because their handlers have to get in the ring with them. So if they show aggression toward the handlers, they usually don't make the cut. They're trained to be aggressive to other animals, not humans."

The dog who escaped seems to have been willing to make at least one exception for that rule. We hope that both will find happy endings, wherever they wind up.

Via WMBF News and SCNow 


The Scoop | The Scoop

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On God and Google

This isn’t the first time my I-Phone has altered the course of things for me.  One of our supporters asked for my help on a cancer related issue and in my haste, I texted my reply as ‘At your service’ but autocorrect sent it as ‘At your cervix’.  

Sunday, I was on my way to the flagons, dragons, and wenches of the Renaissance Festival in Connecticut and when I typed in the address for it at 14 Stott Avenue, Google Maps autocorrected it for 14 Scott Street. 

And that took me to a place I’ve never been to before, but to a known yet forgotten land.

——–

The Saint Peters and Saint Paul Church sits atop a rolling Northeastern hillside in Norwich, and it was there I found the 14 stations of the Cross.  It’s a beautiful, bucolic place of pray and it’ll now and always be one of my just circles.  

I walked the grounds, reflected on its grace and glory and historical significance, wept for our loved ones lost by cancer, then got back in my car and carried on to the Renaissance festival.  

Our path isn’t up to us.  I forgot about that.  Shit.  I forgot about a lot of things.   But I just got reminded.  It’s up to Google.  And God.  

2 Dogs 2,000 Miles

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MEDFLAG 09: U.S. Army Africa Partnership strengthens ties with partners in Swaziland 090813

Check out these dental treat images:

MEDFLAG 09: U.S. Army Africa Partnership strengthens ties with partners in Swaziland 090813
dental treat

Image by US Army Africa
www.usaraf.army.mil

United States Army Africa

MEDFLAG 09: Partnership strengthens ties and friendships

By Staff Sgt. Lesley Waters
CJTF-HOA Public Affairs

MANZINI, Swaziland – Partnership was the key to success during MEDFLAG 09, a U.S. Army Africa exercise held this August that benefited thousands of people in Swazi villages.

That partnership was built on cooperation between the U.S. military and government of Swaziland, said Maj. Gen. William B. Garrett III, commander of U.S. Army Africa.

“Our pledge is to continue to serve side-by-side with our national and international partners to promote security, stability and peace in Africa, and of course in Swaziland,” Garrett said. “MEDFLAG 09 has been an important demonstration of our commitment to our African and partnered nations.”

The exercise included the Umbutfo Swaziland Defence Force, the Swaziland Ministry of Health, U.S. Army Africa and U.S. Africa Command.

Swazi medical staff got firsthand tips from U.S. medical officers. Meanwhile, the U.S. troops learned how to overcome the challenges to offering healthcare in rural African villages, Garrett said.

At a medical professional exchange, a dozen Swazi military and civilian medics took part in a seminar with U.S. medical officers – sharing ideas that build capacity to work together in the future. Through “first responder” mentoring, 25 Swazi medics from the USDF and the health ministry gained important tools that can help them in a crisis.

Overall, 16 Swazi medics, both military and civilians, took part in joint medical missions in local communities that helped Swazi people in need.

“Our Soldiers learned important lessons about how to operate in Africa, while the Swazi medical staff increased their capabilities through our interaction,” Garrett said. “As an added benefit, the people of Swaziland received quality care from this partnership effort.”

During the two-week exercise, roughly 2,400 medical and dental treatments were performed during visits to Swazi villages. At veterinary clinics, nearly 10,500 animals received treatment.

While in Swaziland, Garrett visited the joint U.S.-Swazi medical teams and spoke at the closing ceremony, held Aug. 14 at USDF headquarters.

“American and Swazi medics worked side-by-side to improve our readiness and enhance our ability to work together in combined medical operations,” Garrett said.
U.S. and Swazi teams carried out six veterinary civil assistance projects (VETCAPs), including a two-day visit to Hhohho Village in Zinyane Province, one-day at Shiselweni Village in Mkhwakhweni Province, one day at Manzini Village in Matufseni Province and a two-day visit in Lubombo Village in Maloma Province. During the VETCAPs, the veterinary team treated 6,792 cattle, 3,381 goats, 195 sheep, 195 dogs, one horse and one pig.

They also operated and successfully removed a benign tumor growing on the throat of a cow on the first day of VETCAPs.

“It was an unexpected surprise,” said U.S. Army Maj. Michael Simpson, of the Fort Dix, New Jersey-based 404th Civil Affairs Battalion, who was leading veterinary efforts during MEDFLAG 09. “Even though the tumor was benign it was near the throat. If it continued growing, it would have cut off the cow’s air passage and it would have suffocated.”

As the U.S. and Swazi veterinary teams treated the Swaziland livestock, medical and dental teams treated the local villagers.

The medical teams, which consisted of members from the 212th Combat Support Hospital, the U.S. Army Center for Health and Preventive Medicine and the 21st Sustainment Command, treated 1,519 patients during the six medical civil assistance projects (MEDCAPs).

“We saw patients who had everything from the basic cold to an elderly woman who had a goiter,” said 2nd Lt. Matthew McCreery, MEDFLAG 09’s executive officer.

The dental team, which consisted of members from the 920th Aeromedical Staging Squadron, Patrick AFB, Fla.; 59th Medical Wing, Wilford Medical Hall, Texas; and 212th CSH, treated 262 patients and extracted 273 teeth during the six dental civil assistance projects (DENCAPs).

“We were able to gain the trust of the Swazi villagers,” said Air Force Col. Dean Whitman, oral and maxillofacial surgeon. “Conducting these sorts of missions is important so the Swazis know we have good intentions and our primary concern is to help.”

During MEDFLAG 09, both U.S. and Swazi personnel conducted classes on disaster medical planning and operations, a mass casualty exercise and humanitarian and civic outreach to local communities. Classes included first responder familiarization, disaster relief, preventive medicine and tropical medicine.

“The health of the Swazi people and their livestock is clearly very important,” said U.S. Army Lt. Col. Michael Money, co-director of MEDFLAG 09. “It is our distinct privilege to have worked side-by-side with our new found friends from the USDF and the Ministry of Health, to deliver medical and veterinary care in all four regions of this beautiful land.”

Cleared for public release.

Photos by Air Force Staff Sgt. Lesley Waters. CJTF-HOA Public Affairs

PHOTO CAPTION: A member of a local drama group performs health education skits to villagers of Lubombo during the second of a two-day combined medical and dental civil assistance project (MEDCAP and DENCAP) as part of exercise MEDFLAG 09 in Lubombo Village, Swaziland on Aug. 13

The images are generally considered in the public domain. Request that credit be given to the U.S. Army and individual photographer.

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica

MEDFLAG 09: U.S. Army Africa Partnership strengthens ties with partners in Swaziland 090813
dental treat

Image by US Army Africa
www.usaraf.army.mil

United States Army Africa

MEDFLAG 09: Partnership strengthens ties and friendships

By Staff Sgt. Lesley Waters
CJTF-HOA Public Affairs

MANZINI, Swaziland – Partnership was the key to success during MEDFLAG 09, a U.S. Army Africa exercise held this August that benefited thousands of people in Swazi villages.

That partnership was built on cooperation between the U.S. military and government of Swaziland, said Maj. Gen. William B. Garrett III, commander of U.S. Army Africa.

“Our pledge is to continue to serve side-by-side with our national and international partners to promote security, stability and peace in Africa, and of course in Swaziland,” Garrett said. “MEDFLAG 09 has been an important demonstration of our commitment to our African and partnered nations.”

The exercise included the Umbutfo Swaziland Defence Force, the Swaziland Ministry of Health, U.S. Army Africa and U.S. Africa Command.

Swazi medical staff got firsthand tips from U.S. medical officers. Meanwhile, the U.S. troops learned how to overcome the challenges to offering healthcare in rural African villages, Garrett said.

At a medical professional exchange, a dozen Swazi military and civilian medics took part in a seminar with U.S. medical officers – sharing ideas that build capacity to work together in the future. Through “first responder” mentoring, 25 Swazi medics from the USDF and the health ministry gained important tools that can help them in a crisis.

Overall, 16 Swazi medics, both military and civilians, took part in joint medical missions in local communities that helped Swazi people in need.

“Our Soldiers learned important lessons about how to operate in Africa, while the Swazi medical staff increased their capabilities through our interaction,” Garrett said. “As an added benefit, the people of Swaziland received quality care from this partnership effort.”

During the two-week exercise, roughly 2,400 medical and dental treatments were performed during visits to Swazi villages. At veterinary clinics, nearly 10,500 animals received treatment.

While in Swaziland, Garrett visited the joint U.S.-Swazi medical teams and spoke at the closing ceremony, held Aug. 14 at USDF headquarters.

“American and Swazi medics worked side-by-side to improve our readiness and enhance our ability to work together in combined medical operations,” Garrett said.
U.S. and Swazi teams carried out six veterinary civil assistance projects (VETCAPs), including a two-day visit to Hhohho Village in Zinyane Province, one-day at Shiselweni Village in Mkhwakhweni Province, one day at Manzini Village in Matufseni Province and a two-day visit in Lubombo Village in Maloma Province. During the VETCAPs, the veterinary team treated 6,792 cattle, 3,381 goats, 195 sheep, 195 dogs, one horse and one pig.

They also operated and successfully removed a benign tumor growing on the throat of a cow on the first day of VETCAPs.

“It was an unexpected surprise,” said U.S. Army Maj. Michael Simpson, of the Fort Dix, New Jersey-based 404th Civil Affairs Battalion, who was leading veterinary efforts during MEDFLAG 09. “Even though the tumor was benign it was near the throat. If it continued growing, it would have cut off the cow’s air passage and it would have suffocated.”

As the U.S. and Swazi veterinary teams treated the Swaziland livestock, medical and dental teams treated the local villagers.

The medical teams, which consisted of members from the 212th Combat Support Hospital, the U.S. Army Center for Health and Preventive Medicine and the 21st Sustainment Command, treated 1,519 patients during the six medical civil assistance projects (MEDCAPs).

“We saw patients who had everything from the basic cold to an elderly woman who had a goiter,” said 2nd Lt. Matthew McCreery, MEDFLAG 09’s executive officer.

The dental team, which consisted of members from the 920th Aeromedical Staging Squadron, Patrick AFB, Fla.; 59th Medical Wing, Wilford Medical Hall, Texas; and 212th CSH, treated 262 patients and extracted 273 teeth during the six dental civil assistance projects (DENCAPs).

“We were able to gain the trust of the Swazi villagers,” said Air Force Col. Dean Whitman, oral and maxillofacial surgeon. “Conducting these sorts of missions is important so the Swazis know we have good intentions and our primary concern is to help.”

During MEDFLAG 09, both U.S. and Swazi personnel conducted classes on disaster medical planning and operations, a mass casualty exercise and humanitarian and civic outreach to local communities. Classes included first responder familiarization, disaster relief, preventive medicine and tropical medicine.

“The health of the Swazi people and their livestock is clearly very important,” said U.S. Army Lt. Col. Michael Money, co-director of MEDFLAG 09. “It is our distinct privilege to have worked side-by-side with our new found friends from the USDF and the Ministry of Health, to deliver medical and veterinary care in all four regions of this beautiful land.”
Cleared for public release.

Photos by Air Force Staff Sgt. Lesley Waters. CJTF-HOA Public Affairs

PHOTO CAPTION: U.S. Army Africa Commander Maj. Gen. William B. Garrett III talks with Army Capt. Charlie Pastor and Army Spc. Michelle Fiveash, U.S. service members participating in exercise MEDFLAG 09, during his visit of Lubombo Village on the second day of the combined medical and dental civil assistance project (MEDCAP and DENCAP) as part of exercise MEDFLAG 09 on Aug. 13.

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica

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