The One and Only

There is no doubt about it.  Boone is one of a kind.  He’s staying with us for 2 weeks and he fits in amazingly well. He COMPLETELY ignores the cats.  So much so, that Jack doesn’t even flinch when he is in the same room as him.  Boone likes his “safety” area (which happens to be the bathroom attached to our bedroom) and we let him hang out there as much as he wants. The first few days that was pretty much the entire time, but now he is mainly out and about with us.

These are just a few of my favourite photos from this past week.  He is super fun to photograph and he rarely sits still.  Today happens to be his 10th Birthday – hence the balloons in the photo above.  :)

Crazy Coulee and Little Lacey

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Companion Animal Dental Care

Dr Oscar Albarracin demonstrates dental care for your companion pets.

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What can you say to compliment someone for a look you think is hideous?

We’ve all been in the situation. Your friend, co-worker or relative has spent time and money on a look she thinks is fabulous. But you think she probably should sue whoever did this. What do you say without hurting feelings when confronted with something like–…
The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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Waterton Weekend

We  had plans to go hiking in Waterton this weekend with my Dad and his wife Shelley… what we hadn’t really planned on doing was camping overnight but at the last minute we decided to go for it.  It was our first trip of the season if you can believe it!  We got there pretty late on Friday (it was already dark) and thankfully Dad and Shelley had gotten us a site as the campground was full. We couldn’t believe that is was full this late in the season, but it was such a gorgeous weekend, I’m not sure why we were surprised.

We spent Saturday hiking up to, and around, Bertha Lake. Dad and Shelley had never done the hike before and Marlin had only done it once, so it was a good choice. We hit the trail fairly early and didn’t see many people on the way up. The way down was another story.  I had to actually carry Lacey across the bridge at the falls as I wasn’t sure how she was going to navigate the small space jammed with people.  I was literally weaving in and out of them trying to get across.

We saw a few people walking around with their cameras in the hands and one guy hauling his up with his tripod attached and full extended.  I guess he truly wanted to be ready at a moment’s notice.  It was the second time I wore my Cotton Carrier on a hike and I was pretty happy with it, although I haven’t tried it with a big heavy lens yet.  By the end of the hike it was feeling a bit uncomfortable, but so was everything else.  :)

Today I spent hanging out at the trailer while Marlin golfed.  It was super peaceful.  I napped and read and just hung out with the pups. At one point I thought I might wander around and take pictures but that seemed like too much effort so these are all from the hike.

Crazy Coulee and Little Lacey

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MusicDish*China Books Fall China Tour for French Blues Rock Band Voodoo


New York, NY (PRWEB) September 18, 2013

MusicDish*China announced that Toulon-based blues rock band Voodoo will be making a comeback tour to China this fall, after their successful debut tour last April. The fall tour will kick off at Tiajin’s 13 Club on October 3rd and sees them play 17 additional shows across China. Highlights from the tour include shows at Beijing’s renowned Yu Gong Yi Shan and Temple Bar as well as Shanghai’s Mao Live House 4th Anniversary Party. Additional cities thus far include Yingchuan, Xining, Lanzhou, Chengdu, Xian, Zhengzhou Suzhou, Nanjing, Jiaxing, Guiyang and Kunming – more cities and dates will be announced shortly.

VOODOO CHINA FALL TOUR

Thurs, 10/3 Tian Jing – 13 Club

Sat, 10/5 Beijing – Yu Gong Yi Shan

Sun, 10/6 Beijing – Temple

Thurs, 10/10 Yingchuan – Tong Guan Live House

Fri, 10/11 Xining – ??

Sat, 10/12 Lanzhou – Kui Live House

Sun, 10/13 Chengdu – Chengdu Little Bar

Wed, 10/16 Xian – Guang Quan Club

Thurs, 10/17 Zhengzhou – 7 Live House

Fri, 10/18 Beijing – Jiang Hu Bar

Sat, 10/19 Beijing – 69 Cafe

Sun, 10/20 Shanghai – Yu Yin Tang

Wed, 10/23 Suzhou – Wave Live House

Thurs, 10/24 Nanjing – Castle

Fri, 10/25 Jiaxing – Oldwood Village

Sat, 10/26 Shanghai – Mao Live House (4th year anniversary party)

Sun, 10/27 Chongqing – Nuts

Tue, 10/29 Guiyang – ??Club

Thurs, 10/30 Kunming – ????

Voodoo’s inaugural spring tour, also booked by MusicDish*China, included 13 shows in 10 cities, including showcasing the Sound of the Xity festival in Beijing and performing the Sennheiser Stage at the Formula One Shanghai Grand Prix. The band was also filmed for youth-centric video portal Niurenku’s “Hutong Jams” series which has garnered over 50,000 views on China’s equivalent to YouTube, Youku.com.

Check out Voodoo video “Glory and Gold” on Youku featuring footage from the band’s Spring 2013 Tour:

“Glory and Gold” on Youku – http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XNTc4NjM3NzQ0.html

“Glory and Gold” on YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ramfpTg22ho

Voodoo is a blues rock band under the label, Angel Sweet Records. Channeling blues, electronic, and classic rock, the band carries a wealth of influences that they somehow meld into their own unique sound. The four members hail from very different musical backgrounds, and when they formed the band in 2007, the diversity of influences helped the band find their own blend of music.

http://site.douban.com/voodoomusic

http://www.weibo.com/voodoomusic

New York-based MusicDish*China (http://china.musicdish.com) serves as a bridge between East & West, working with major acts from Taiwan (sa. Golden Melody Award winners Jolin Tsai, Mayday, Da Mouth) and China (Shanren) while developing Western acts for the Greater China market. MusicDish*China has partnered with key events, from Midi and Zebra festivals to the Sound of the Xity conference that, in combination with its social media presence, has given it a unique brand positioning in the market. MusicDish also provide distribution/marketing and touring for Western acts. MusicDish*China recently signed electronic acts DJ Code and RED for international management.







More Mouth Press Releases

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Practice

I’m photographing an older dog tonight.  I’m not normally nervous before photo sessions but for this one, I know the dog isn’t going to be running around making my job easy.  I know I’m going to have to pose him in front of things and get “pretty pictures”.  I really don’t set up shots very often so I felt I should go check out the area see what the light is like at this time of year and practice.

I’m so glad I practiced.  My first 50 or so shots were so bad they were very comical. I’m not exaggerating.  They were horrible. It took me a while to get in the groove of things.  :)

But between me and Coulee, we figured it out eventually.  I really couldn’t ask for a better model.  She just sat or laid down wherever I asked her to, perked her ears and looked at me (or rather the toy in my hand).

Her only downfall is getting her to stand on command.  As soon as I said “stay”, she’d sit or lay down as she knew she was going to be there a while.  If I told her to “go around” which is basically to back up more and wait for the toy to be thrown, I could get her to stand still but her final location wasn’t always that predictable, but it worked out for the most part.

I’m starting to feel I should attempt this more often.  Maybe on holidays (next week!!!) I’ll try it a bit more.  :)

Crazy Coulee and Little Lacey

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Two Towers Four Paws

A beautiful blog by Teri Modisette

last remaining dogs
Eleven years ago today, the Twin Towers slipped from the sky and plummeted to earth as America watched in shock. As that once beautiful Autumn day wore on to evening, news outlets reported many people still trapped, slowing dying in the avalanche of metal. How did they know? Those people used cell phones to call their families from beneath the remains of the World Trade Center. One by one, they said final goodbyes as the last of their cell phone batteries blinked out.

No one yet knew the death toll would reach nearly 3,000. All the rescue teams could do was send help. That night as pictures and “Please help me find my son” and “Please help me find my daughter” flyers went up around NYC, help arrived at Ground Zero on four legs.
Several sets of four legs, to be exact.
Emergency workers had flooded the area with light, enabling them to pair with public volunteers in a desperate search for the living, but they needed help from something with better hearing and a better sense of smell than the average human being. They were helped by Moxie and Tara from Massachusetts, Guinness from California, Kaiser from Indianapolis, Bretagne from Texas, Red from Maryland, Hoke from Denver. It was a long shot to call in search and rescue dogs. As good as the dogs were, 9/11 was undeniably a large-scale tragedy.
Search-and-rescue dogs are trained to pick up certain scents on the ground and in the air. Well-trained search dogs have proven to be the fastest way to locate a victim in the aftermath of a disaster like an earthquake or hurricane. Disaster search-and-rescue dogs are trained to find people in incredibly unstable environments, where smoke or chemical smells might affect the results of the dog’s search.
Three hundred and eighteen search-and-rescue dogs were trained to find the living who may have survived 9/11. Unfortunately, the terrorist attacks were a true disaster, making it a fruitless search. Despite this, the dogs at Ground Zero were seen doing what dogs do so well– comforting the firemen and first responders during the darkest hours of their lives.
In total, 950 canine dog teams served in response to September 11, 2001. They served at Ground Zero, the Pentagon, and that field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania.
Eleven years later, 2 Million Dogs remembers the day our best friends experienced  alongside all in this great nation– and the sweet snuggles and tail wags as our tears rolled down.
We will never forget.
Teri’s blog and all of the blogs posted by her and Erich Trapp can be read at the 2 Million Dogs Blog
——–
YBD’s Notes 1: Thank you, Teri for this beautifully written tribute to the service dogs of 9/11.  
YBD’s Notes 2:  Lest we all forget, dogs are essential to our survival and the very essence of our goodness.  

2 Dogs 2,000 Miles

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MEDFLAG 09: U.S. Army Africa Partnership strengthens ties with partners in Swaziland 090813

A few nice dental treat images I found:

MEDFLAG 09: U.S. Army Africa Partnership strengthens ties with partners in Swaziland 090813
dental treat

Image by US Army Africa
www.usaraf.army.mil

United States Army Africa

MEDFLAG 09: Partnership strengthens ties and friendships

By Staff Sgt. Lesley Waters
CJTF-HOA Public Affairs

MANZINI, Swaziland – Partnership was the key to success during MEDFLAG 09, a U.S. Army Africa exercise held this August that benefited thousands of people in Swazi villages.

That partnership was built on cooperation between the U.S. military and government of Swaziland, said Maj. Gen. William B. Garrett III, commander of U.S. Army Africa.

“Our pledge is to continue to serve side-by-side with our national and international partners to promote security, stability and peace in Africa, and of course in Swaziland,” Garrett said. “MEDFLAG 09 has been an important demonstration of our commitment to our African and partnered nations.”

The exercise included the Umbutfo Swaziland Defence Force, the Swaziland Ministry of Health, U.S. Army Africa and U.S. Africa Command.

Swazi medical staff got firsthand tips from U.S. medical officers. Meanwhile, the U.S. troops learned how to overcome the challenges to offering healthcare in rural African villages, Garrett said.

At a medical professional exchange, a dozen Swazi military and civilian medics took part in a seminar with U.S. medical officers – sharing ideas that build capacity to work together in the future. Through “first responder” mentoring, 25 Swazi medics from the USDF and the health ministry gained important tools that can help them in a crisis.

Overall, 16 Swazi medics, both military and civilians, took part in joint medical missions in local communities that helped Swazi people in need.

“Our Soldiers learned important lessons about how to operate in Africa, while the Swazi medical staff increased their capabilities through our interaction,” Garrett said. “As an added benefit, the people of Swaziland received quality care from this partnership effort.”

During the two-week exercise, roughly 2,400 medical and dental treatments were performed during visits to Swazi villages. At veterinary clinics, nearly 10,500 animals received treatment.

While in Swaziland, Garrett visited the joint U.S.-Swazi medical teams and spoke at the closing ceremony, held Aug. 14 at USDF headquarters.

“American and Swazi medics worked side-by-side to improve our readiness and enhance our ability to work together in combined medical operations,” Garrett said.
U.S. and Swazi teams carried out six veterinary civil assistance projects (VETCAPs), including a two-day visit to Hhohho Village in Zinyane Province, one-day at Shiselweni Village in Mkhwakhweni Province, one day at Manzini Village in Matufseni Province and a two-day visit in Lubombo Village in Maloma Province. During the VETCAPs, the veterinary team treated 6,792 cattle, 3,381 goats, 195 sheep, 195 dogs, one horse and one pig.

They also operated and successfully removed a benign tumor growing on the throat of a cow on the first day of VETCAPs.

“It was an unexpected surprise,” said U.S. Army Maj. Michael Simpson, of the Fort Dix, New Jersey-based 404th Civil Affairs Battalion, who was leading veterinary efforts during MEDFLAG 09. “Even though the tumor was benign it was near the throat. If it continued growing, it would have cut off the cow’s air passage and it would have suffocated.”

As the U.S. and Swazi veterinary teams treated the Swaziland livestock, medical and dental teams treated the local villagers.

The medical teams, which consisted of members from the 212th Combat Support Hospital, the U.S. Army Center for Health and Preventive Medicine and the 21st Sustainment Command, treated 1,519 patients during the six medical civil assistance projects (MEDCAPs).

“We saw patients who had everything from the basic cold to an elderly woman who had a goiter,” said 2nd Lt. Matthew McCreery, MEDFLAG 09’s executive officer.

The dental team, which consisted of members from the 920th Aeromedical Staging Squadron, Patrick AFB, Fla.; 59th Medical Wing, Wilford Medical Hall, Texas; and 212th CSH, treated 262 patients and extracted 273 teeth during the six dental civil assistance projects (DENCAPs).

“We were able to gain the trust of the Swazi villagers,” said Air Force Col. Dean Whitman, oral and maxillofacial surgeon. “Conducting these sorts of missions is important so the Swazis know we have good intentions and our primary concern is to help.”

During MEDFLAG 09, both U.S. and Swazi personnel conducted classes on disaster medical planning and operations, a mass casualty exercise and humanitarian and civic outreach to local communities. Classes included first responder familiarization, disaster relief, preventive medicine and tropical medicine.

“The health of the Swazi people and their livestock is clearly very important,” said U.S. Army Lt. Col. Michael Money, co-director of MEDFLAG 09. “It is our distinct privilege to have worked side-by-side with our new found friends from the USDF and the Ministry of Health, to deliver medical and veterinary care in all four regions of this beautiful land.”

Cleared for public release.

Photos by Air Force Staff Sgt. Lesley Waters. CJTF-HOA Public Affairs

PHOTO CAPTION: Students from Lubombo Village look on as members of a local drama group perform health education skits during the second of a two-day combined medical and dental civil assistance project (MEDCAP and DENCAP) as part of exercise MEDFLAG 09 in Lubombo Village, Swaziland on Aug. 13. More than 600 patients were treated during the two-day visit.

The images are generally considered in the public domain. Request that credit be given to the U.S. Army and individual photographer.

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica

MEDFLAG 09: U.S. Army Africa Partnership strengthens ties with partners in Swaziland 090813
dental treat

Image by US Army Africa
www.usaraf.army.mil

United States Army Africa

MEDFLAG 09: Partnership strengthens ties and friendships

By Staff Sgt. Lesley Waters
CJTF-HOA Public Affairs

MANZINI, Swaziland – Partnership was the key to success during MEDFLAG 09, a U.S. Army Africa exercise held this August that benefited thousands of people in Swazi villages.

That partnership was built on cooperation between the U.S. military and government of Swaziland, said Maj. Gen. William B. Garrett III, commander of U.S. Army Africa.

“Our pledge is to continue to serve side-by-side with our national and international partners to promote security, stability and peace in Africa, and of course in Swaziland,” Garrett said. “MEDFLAG 09 has been an important demonstration of our commitment to our African and partnered nations.”

The exercise included the Umbutfo Swaziland Defence Force, the Swaziland Ministry of Health, U.S. Army Africa and U.S. Africa Command.

Swazi medical staff got firsthand tips from U.S. medical officers. Meanwhile, the U.S. troops learned how to overcome the challenges to offering healthcare in rural African villages, Garrett said.

At a medical professional exchange, a dozen Swazi military and civilian medics took part in a seminar with U.S. medical officers – sharing ideas that build capacity to work together in the future. Through “first responder” mentoring, 25 Swazi medics from the USDF and the health ministry gained important tools that can help them in a crisis.

Overall, 16 Swazi medics, both military and civilians, took part in joint medical missions in local communities that helped Swazi people in need.

“Our Soldiers learned important lessons about how to operate in Africa, while the Swazi medical staff increased their capabilities through our interaction,” Garrett said. “As an added benefit, the people of Swaziland received quality care from this partnership effort.”

During the two-week exercise, roughly 2,400 medical and dental treatments were performed during visits to Swazi villages. At veterinary clinics, nearly 10,500 animals received treatment.

While in Swaziland, Garrett visited the joint U.S.-Swazi medical teams and spoke at the closing ceremony, held Aug. 14 at USDF headquarters.

“American and Swazi medics worked side-by-side to improve our readiness and enhance our ability to work together in combined medical operations,” Garrett said.
U.S. and Swazi teams carried out six veterinary civil assistance projects (VETCAPs), including a two-day visit to Hhohho Village in Zinyane Province, one-day at Shiselweni Village in Mkhwakhweni Province, one day at Manzini Village in Matufseni Province and a two-day visit in Lubombo Village in Maloma Province. During the VETCAPs, the veterinary team treated 6,792 cattle, 3,381 goats, 195 sheep, 195 dogs, one horse and one pig.

They also operated and successfully removed a benign tumor growing on the throat of a cow on the first day of VETCAPs.

“It was an unexpected surprise,” said U.S. Army Maj. Michael Simpson, of the Fort Dix, New Jersey-based 404th Civil Affairs Battalion, who was leading veterinary efforts during MEDFLAG 09. “Even though the tumor was benign it was near the throat. If it continued growing, it would have cut off the cow’s air passage and it would have suffocated.”

As the U.S. and Swazi veterinary teams treated the Swaziland livestock, medical and dental teams treated the local villagers.

The medical teams, which consisted of members from the 212th Combat Support Hospital, the U.S. Army Center for Health and Preventive Medicine and the 21st Sustainment Command, treated 1,519 patients during the six medical civil assistance projects (MEDCAPs).

“We saw patients who had everything from the basic cold to an elderly woman who had a goiter,” said 2nd Lt. Matthew McCreery, MEDFLAG 09’s executive officer.

The dental team, which consisted of members from the 920th Aeromedical Staging Squadron, Patrick AFB, Fla.; 59th Medical Wing, Wilford Medical Hall, Texas; and 212th CSH, treated 262 patients and extracted 273 teeth during the six dental civil assistance projects (DENCAPs).

“We were able to gain the trust of the Swazi villagers,” said Air Force Col. Dean Whitman, oral and maxillofacial surgeon. “Conducting these sorts of missions is important so the Swazis know we have good intentions and our primary concern is to help.”

During MEDFLAG 09, both U.S. and Swazi personnel conducted classes on disaster medical planning and operations, a mass casualty exercise and humanitarian and civic outreach to local communities. Classes included first responder familiarization, disaster relief, preventive medicine and tropical medicine.

“The health of the Swazi people and their livestock is clearly very important,” said U.S. Army Lt. Col. Michael Money, co-director of MEDFLAG 09. “It is our distinct privilege to have worked side-by-side with our new found friends from the USDF and the Ministry of Health, to deliver medical and veterinary care in all four regions of this beautiful land.”
Cleared for public release.

Photos by Air Force Staff Sgt. Lesley Waters. CJTF-HOA Public Affairs

PHOTO CAPTION: Army Pvt. Reginald Lee, 212th Combat Support Hospital dental hygienist, assist Air Force Col. Dean Whitman, 59th Medical Wing Wilford Medical Hall oral and maxillofacial surgeon, in an extraction procedure during the combined medical and dental civil assistance project (MEDCAP and DENCAP) as part of exercise MEDFLAG 09 in Lubombo Village, Swaziland on August 13.

The images are generally considered in the public domain. Request that credit be given to the U.S. Army and individual photographer.

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica

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A Lazy Sunday Walk

The shih-tzu in the distance is called Billy – even though she’s a girl.  She was named for Billy Jean King.  The part-Husky is called Lucky and the Beagle is Caillou.  Billy belongs to my friend Carla and Lucky and Caillou are staying with her.
RIVIERA DOGS

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Plants That are Harmful or Can Injure Your Dog

If you’re a dog lover, thoughts of long evening strolls and outdoor recreation with your dog fill your head. In fact, you may have already started to create new fond memories. Given that, the last thing you want on one of your nature walks is for your canine companion to be sidelined by an injury. Unfortunately, many pet parents don’t realize until it’s too late that there are menacing toxins lurking in the plants of both cultivated and wild landscapes. Plants that you are used to seeing in public parks, your neighborhood and perhaps even in your own backyard can lead to devastating effects. First up are four plants commonly used in landscaping that are actually toxic to canines.

Azalea – Rhododendron Species
A typical choice for landscapers due to its hardiness and lovely flowers, these unassuming ornamentals contain a toxin which can be lethal, even in small amounts. Both the plant’s leaves and nectar are known to be harmful if eaten or chewed by your dog, and can cause drooling (often a symptom of nausea), vomiting, weakness and collapse. If greater amounts of its toxins are ingested, it can lead to severe poisoning, possible coma and even death.

Oleander
Widely recognized as one of the most poisonous plants in the world, even minute quantities of Oleander can trigger a fatal response. Unlike the Azalea, every part of the Oleander is toxic, from flowers to roots. If dogs should chew on any part of this plant, they could suffer varying degrees of illness, including upset stomach, abnormal heart functioning and possibly even death. Beware of the sap, which can irritate the skin and eyes, as well as the leaves, which retain their toxicity even when dried out.

Sago Palm
Most commonly used in planned landscapes where climates tend to be hot and dry, Sago Palms are nevertheless popular all over the U.S. While the whole plant contains harmful chemicals, it’s the seeds that contain the highest levels of toxins. Estimates currently put the percentage of animals that die after eating the seeds of the plant as high as three out of four. The incidence of Sago Palm poisoning in dogs and cats has risen 200% in the past few years, although dogs seem to enjoy the flavor of the plant and the seeds more than cats. Ingestion of Sago Palm can cause vomiting, diarrhea, liver failure and seizures.

Chrysanthemum
Chrysanthemums are popular ornamentals blooming late in the summer and early in the fall. While beautiful, their flowers contain a natural insecticide. If a canine chews on the Chrysanthemum blooms, the insecticide can cause excessive drooling, vomiting and diarrhea.

If your furry one is exposed to any of these toxic plants, please contact your veterinarian immediately. As is often the case in toxins and poisons, the sooner your pet receives treatment, the less likely they are to experience dramatic, and sometimes fatal, reactions.

And now here is a common weed that can cause a great deal of grief for your pets.

Foxtails
Weeds that resemble the tail of a fox, Foxtails are considered a widespread nuisance in most states, especially west of the Mississippi. Prevalent from late spring to early fall, they become more dangerous in late summer when their seeds dry. When the seeds are released from their pods, they are covered in barbs like little fish hooks, making them potentially very dangerous to your dog. If she merely brushes up against the Foxtail plant, the seeds can become snagged in her coat. Worse, the seeds can pierce the skin, or even be inhaled!

As a result, Foxtail seeds can become lodged between a dog’s toes, in their ears or armpits; they can be inhaled or swallowed and latch onto the interior walls of the nose or throat; or, they can stick to the eyes. Obviously, all of these circumstances can be very painful. Perhaps most frightening, the seeds are so small that they can be difficult to locate, and, if embedded in the skin, have been known to migrate to other areas of the body, resulting in severe infections.

If the Foxtail seed becomes infected under the skin, it may result in a visible, inflamed and painful lump. Commonly these lumps are between the toes, and are painful enough that your dog will repeatedly lick or chew the raised area. If a seed becomes lodged in your dog’s nose, she will likely sneeze, violently and over-and-over, and may even repeatedly paw at her face. If the seed latches to or in her ear, she will likely shake her head side-to-side and/or scratch incessantly at her ear. In the case where a Foxtail becomes stuck in or near the eye, you’ll likely see lots of repeated squinting, tears and redness; you may even see the foxtail poking out!

If you see any evidence of an encounter with a Foxtail, take your dog to the vet immediately. If you notice a red bump in between the toes, soak the paw in a mixture of lukewarm water and Epsom salts. This will help to ease the swelling until you can be seen by your veterinarian. Keep in mind that the longer you wait for treatment, the more difficult it is to treat an embedded Foxtail seed, so time is of the essence.

The best way to prevent Foxtail incidents is with an ounce of prevention. During hikes, keep your dog away from grassy weeds, and check her paws after walks. In addition, you should consider brushing her coat while using your hand to feel for any raised areas, checking inside the ears, in between toes, under armpits and throughout the belly and groin area. If you find a Foxtail in the coat, carefully pull or brush it out. If your dog has thick or long hair, consider getting a ‘Foxtail Clip’, a term applied to trimming away the hair between your dog’s toes. And, if you live in an area where Foxtails are common, remove them from your yard (be sure to exercise caution and carefully bag the weeds).

By using a little common sense and being aware of your surroundings, summer walks can be fun and free from environmental injuries. Then, you can get back to making some wonderful, new, summer memories together with your dog outdoors.

The Perfect Pet Food Blog

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