It is very nice information…My dog also suffers fr…

It is very nice information…My dog also suffers from SA and can go through crates (or walls) in about an hour. Finally after coming home to her out but with a collapsed crate hooked into her skin and being dragged around the apartment I gave in and bought this.i’ll wait for your next article.
BAD RAP Blog

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Crossing the road

red fox at night

Our motor vehicles speed away on ribbons of asphalt. We run along them as they cut along the cities and suburbs but also as they wind their way through the pastures and cornfields and the stands of forest that somewhat resemble wilderness.

Our roads intersect their trails. The wild beasts scurry across them when they cannot hear the whirring of tires and the humming of the internal combustion engines. They race across hoping almost as an act of instinctual faith that that vehicles won’t slam into them and take the great toll of impersonal and unintentional predation that we call roadkill.

And so one night this week, I found myself winding along desolate roads in Western Pennsylvania. The darkness of night enveloped all around me. Only the lights on my vehicle pierced this veil.

And as a rounded a bend in the road, my headlights scanned down upon what I instantly recognized as a deer. But as I motored in closer, the lights revealed a massive buck with a great crown of white rapiers. The rut is nigh, and this is the time of thick necks and grunting and long solitary perambulations through the darkness. Soon, the sensual scents of the does will cast into the wind, and the ancient rites of courtship and copulation will commence.

And the bucks that once wandered around as comrades in the oak woods with velvet headdresses as the deerflies tore at their ears in the July swselter are now turning into the worst rivals.

But by mid-December, the does will stop their sweet waftings, and the testosterone levels will drop in the bodies of the bucks. By January, the antlers will fall, and the rivals will bunch up as comrades again, ready for the long freezing time where the mast of autumn better be bountiful enough to see the deer until first green grass of March.

I shouted with elation from my driver’s seat:

“Look at that buck!”

The buck looked alarmed at my stopping then moseyed into the woods along the road. I motored on.

Jenna asked,  “Would you have shot that one?”

And all I could say is, “Yes.”

That same night, on another desolate road in Western Pennsylvania, I made a turn onto a crooked course that skirted along the edge of a uncut cornfield.

As I approached the edge of the cornfield, a red fox charged out of a hidden covert, and then darted into the tall corn.

He was a beautiful specimen, probably looking at a nice night of mousing where no one could lay eyes upon him, especially not someone with a nice little predator rifle.

We are not long before the days of the foothold traps set in for the red fox and all the other little fur-bearers of the forest and field. Those traps won’t fool many of the old veterans, the ones that have run that gauntlet for a winter or two or five or six,  but the young rangers of the year will surely fall.

But in the next spring, the vixens will whelp in their dens, and the fields will fill with young rangers again.

We watched the fox slink into the corn.

“That was the first red fox I ever saw!” Jenna shouted at me. I guess Florida is pretty depauperate of wild canids, for she told me that there are no red foxes in the lower parts of the peninsula. They are so common here outside of the subtropics. They appear as eternal as the hills and the rocks and the streams, but the truth is they were absent in this part of the continent until the Europeans came. Then, they wandered down out Canada and New England into the newly cleared lands. The legend goes that they were stocked here from England or Germany, a legend that goes in nicely with the repeopling of this land with people mostly of that ancestry after having driven off and subjugated the descendants of that first colonization from Siberia.

As we motored along back into Ohio, the deer stood along the road, almost daring themselves to jump in front of our vehicle. One stupid little button buck staggered out in front of us. He stared up at the headlights in the cliched expression and then turned his head to stagger around to the opposite side of the road.

And we motored on in the darkness. My mind was on the road, but I thought of the paradox of the blacktop. The road and the motor car have given us what appears to be unlimited freedom.  We can cross the continent in a matter of days, if we just get in our vehicle and go on the road.

But in that freedom, we are limited. We must follow that road, as does everyone else who travels.

But the deer and the foxes and all the wild beasts of the fields roam their trails. These paths might be ancient, but they are made through the inertia of instinct, always seeking the path of least resistance to get from the bedding areas to the grazing or hunting grounds.

The beast that thrive here now thrive mostly because of us. We have killed off the wolves and the cougars, and then modern agriculture has made Appalachian hill farming mostly unprofitable.  Farm families are rarer and rarer upon the land, and the thickets and coverts grow to hide the wild creatures more completely.

And so we’ve let these parallel worlds grow up in our wastegrounds.  Most of us never pay much attention to these worlds, but when we go upon our ribbons of blacktop at night, our paths meet. Sometimes, we slam into deer and crush foxes and raccoons. But more often, we just meet. Our headlights illuminate the denizens of that other world.

Perhaps we allow ourselves the chance to marvel at them, and maybe we can consider their plight as beings more deeply tied to the ecosystem. We can maybe consider them a bit, and then realize that we are also tied to it. We’ve built walls around us to insulate ourselves from the realities of the cold, heat, parasites, and hunger.

But these walls are but edifices of delusion. Nature’s laws still abide with us, and that our dominance is only temporary and maybe only illusory.

And when we consider their plight, their existence, we must ultimately fully consider our own.

At least, that is what I’d hope we’d do as the night draws in darker.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural History

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Bonus Friday Funny: Witness Protection

The caption on this reads: “This was her hiding spot after chewing up her dog bed.” I can’t see her, can you? Hoping this weekend brings you zero reasons to hide! Until next time, Good day, and good dog!


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Shootout at the OK Corral—only with dogs

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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I have an 80lb pit/lab mix. He has been a handful …

I have an 80lb pit/lab mix. He has been a handful to walk on a leash. I have tried almost every type of harness and collar with no luck. I finally tried the prong collar and have had amazing results.

But recently my dog has been able to break the links apart if he sees something he wants. I purchased the largest/strongest prong collar available. Does anyone have any suggestions about what I should do?
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Cats 1, Dogs 0

LOL. Funny cat. Until next time, Good day, and good dog!


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15 Creative Wacky Hair Day Ideas For Kids

15 Creative Wacky Hair Day Ideas For Kids
15 Creative Wacky Hair Day Ideas For Kids
15 Creative Wacky Hair Day Ideas For Kids

Yesterday was ‘Crazy Hair Day’ at Essley’s school, and until the night before, I didn’t put much thought into what we’d do. I figured I’d just put a bunch of braids in her hair, until I decided to do a quick search for ideas and was blown away by the seriously next level creativity I saw. I was actually really inspired, and ended up doing mini pumpkin buns (which she loved; there may have been a small fight when it was time to wash out the orange hairspray). But there were so many other fun ideas I came across that I decided to put together a list of them for you guys, in case your little ones have wacky hair days coming up at school as well.

  • pumpkin buns 
  • cupcake buns (two buns sitting on top of cupcake liners; Essley’s friend Harper did this.))
  • doughnut bun (shape bun into doughnut, cover with felt circle and fake sprinkles)
  • unicorn hair (pastel colors and a horn; Essley’s friend Livie did this.)
  • soda pouring into a cup (google this one; so creative!)
  • surfing/wave hair (perfect for short hair; paint hair blue and style in a faux hawk)
  • bird nest bun (large doughbut bun with a bird attached)
  • garden hair (paint green and add flower barrettes)
  • rainbow hair (two buns like clouds with colored pipe cleaners to form a rainbow)
  • mermaid tail hair (green or blue braid with a mermaid cut-out attached on top)
  • hair bow (hair shaped into a bow and sprayed a bright color)
  • spider hair (bun on top with eight braids hanging down)
  • dirt hair (spray or paint black and attach rubber insects)
  • spiral hair (super easy; attach lots of colorful pipecleaners shaped into spirals)
  • birthday cake hair (like cupcake buns above, but with one large bun and a candle inserted)

If you have any other ideas I might have missed, let me know in the comments!

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Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

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Stray dog joins the soccer game

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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The Salukis

One week ago today, Jenna and I went to Pittsburgh to pick up some puppies at the airport. We found ourselves at some desolate warehouse place, but yes, they had our delivery from Albuquerque.

They loaded the shipping box into our van. Zoom, the old whippet, raised his head to watch the proceedings, and out of that crate rose of cacophony of primitive puppy barks.

The barker was the brindle named Streamer but called “Baz” at his breeder’s home. He had gone through enough moves and jostles, and to be face to face with that short-eared dog was the last straw.

Jenna quickly got both pups out of the crate. Streamer glowered at me from the passenger seat, but the other puppy, the cream and white Mango, stared up at me with abject suspicious. “You’re not gonna eat me, are you?” his eyes seemed to ask.

And I drove them home. Mango decided that I was his safety, and he began to follow me from room to room. Streamer, a hot-blooded Arabian stallion of a pup, decided to snap at the old whippet on the sofa, and he received a muzzle snap for his impudence..

Thus began my journey with an even more different sort of dog.  I should add that these are not normal AKC salukis, but they are a cross between a tazi with ancestors from Kazakhstan and Middle Eastern or “desert bred salukis.” Their sire is Tavi, a dog that has been featured on the Qurencia blog many times. Their mother is brindle and white, and thus controversial to the saluki purists. Both live with Shiri Hoshen in New Mexico, and this is the first litter produced between the two parents.

Mango is not ours. He will be going through a vaccine and titer regime over the next few months before he will be send to live with a good friend of this blog in Australia.

But right now, Mango is just learning about this foreign land, where the grass is green and spongy, and the rain drops from the sky regularly and make the air cool and crisp.

He is learning about wolf-like dogs with prick ears and intense eyes, and drop-eared almost Saluki-like things that carry things in their mouths. He will need much socialization to be made ready for that long trip Down Under.

But he has the softest, brownest eyes I’ve ever seen on a dog. He will be a great dog. I just hope to do him justice.

Streamer will be staying here, and I hope will be reformed into a nice high status dog.

/And so I will learn a new breed once again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural History

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Fire Prevention Month: 10 Ways to Ensure Your Family is Super Prepared

10 Family Fire Safety Tips

Thank you First Alert for sponsoring this post. October is Fire Prevention Month – practice safety in numbers to ensure your family’s super prepared too!

Last spring, my daughter came home from preschool wearing a fire hat, and excitedly told us how she got to meet real firefighters, see a fire truck up close, and most importantly, learn more about fire safety. We have always been as prepared as possible for a fire or home emergency, but her newfound interest inspired us to really amp things up and make sure our entire family was regularly involved in discussing and learning about ways to make sure we’re not just prepared, but super prepared.

With October being Fire Prevention Month, I thought it was the perfect time to share with you guys the things we do in our own home and as a family to protect ourselves from fire.

10 Family Fire Safety Tips

1. Get the whole family involved. I’m putting this one first because it is so important! Even though our babes are little (2 and 4), we make sure to include them in the different aspects of whole home safety. We try to make them a part of as many of the 10 tips I’m sharing here as possible. There is truly safety in numbers when it comes to whole home safety.

2. Plan escape routes. My husband and I planned escape routes as soon as we moved into our home, but we recently pulled everyone in the family together and went over them again with the little ones present, discussing how and why we chose the escape routes we did. We walked through our house and talked about all of the different possible exits (including both doors and windows) and the best ways to get to the exits. We also drew out “fire escape treasure maps” as our daughter calls them (floor plans).

10 Family Fire Safety Tips

3. Install smoke and carbon monoxide alarms on every level of your home. This includes the basement if you have one, as well as an alarm both inside and outside of every bedroom (and/or sleeping area). Fires spread fast, and an alarm is one of the best ways to get an early warning. Both of our kids know where the smoke detectors are in our home and what to do if one goes off.

4. Make sure alarms are up to date and working. When we first moved into our home, we noticed that the smoke detectors were over 15 years old, and one of the first things we did was replace them with First Alert Combination Smoke and Carbon Monoxide alarms. It is important to replace alarms every 5 to 10 years, and to either replace the batteries every 6 months or upgrade to First Alert’s 10-year sealed battery alarms. We also regularly test our alarms to ensure they’re working properly.

10 Family Fire Safety Tips

5. Choose a meeting place outside. Our whole family knows that in case of fire or other emergency, once outside we meet at our mail box at the end of our driveway. It is important to decide on a common place outside that is a safe distance from your home where every family member will immediately go.

6. Practice your escape. Every few months, we have pretend fire escape and practice the different escape plans we developed in our home. And when they get a little older (and are less easily frightened), we will have true fire drills, including during the night.

10 Family Fire Safety Tips

7. Make sure everyone in your family knows how to call 911. Our daughter took a safety class over the summer that taught everything from how to deal with strangers to what to do in case of a fire. She also learned how to call 911, but didn’t understand how to do it from a locked cell phone. We made sure to teach her how to do this, while also making certain she understood that you never call 911 unless it’s a true emergency. As soon as we feel that our 2 year old can comprehend it, we will teach him as well.

8. Have working fire extinguishers. We (obviously) keep these out of reach of our kids, but they know where they are an how they work. We live in a 2 story home and have 3 (one on each level including the basement).

10 Family Fire Safety Tips

9. Protect again carbon monoxide too.  I mentioned in #3 above that it’s important to have fire and carbon monoxide alarms on every level, but 40% of homes do not have a single CO alarm. In the United States, carbon monoxide is actually the #1 cause of accidental deaths, and it cannot be seen, heard, or smelled. That’s pretty scary. We have First Alert Combination Smoke and Carbon Monoxide alarms installed throughout our home so we’re protected against both fire and CO.

 10. Talk about it. No matter how hectic things are or how busy our days are, we always have dinner at the table as a family, and we take that time to talk about things that involve us a family. We make sure to discuss fire and overall home safety a couple of times a month at dinner, so our little ones remain aware of its importance. As I said in my first tip, there is safety in numbers when it come to being super prepared in the case of fire. It is a truly a family affair!

10 Family Fire Safety Tips
10 Family Fire Safety Tips

For Fire Prevention Month (and all year long!), First Alert and its Super Prepared Family want to make sure your family is super prepared when it comes to whole home safety. You can learn more in the video below and at this link.

If there are other ways you and your family prepare yourselves in case of fire or other home emergency, please share in the comments!

Thank you for supporting the brands that help make Bubby and Bean possible. I was selected for this opportunity as a member of CLEVER and the content and opinions expressed here are all my own.

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Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

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