What 120 Dogs At A Hometown Buffet Would Look Like

No second trips allowed on this crazy buffet line. Once its your turn you definitely stand your ground with this hungry crowd.

hounds of cheverny

No salad with dressing on the side for these buffet hounds!

 

source: YouTube


The Daily Treat: Animal Planet

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Kiara Reviews Greenies Joint Care

description.
Video Rating: 0 / 5

The WAG & WALK 4 LIFE™ Pledge is a challenge to pet owners to realize the health benefits of regularly walking with their dogs and to motivate them to get mo…
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Posted in Pet Care Media | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Holistic Treatment of Pets: Veterinary Medicine is Changing

How veterinary medicine has changed! Most of the medication and equipment I use today, I never learned about in school! Our pharmacy has ten times the variety of flea control products, antibiotics, and pain relievers than when I started, thirty years ago.

X rays from our digital machine only take seconds to view after exposure and can be emailed to a specialist for a “second opinion”. Their report is often received within a few hours. It used to take days to mail the “films” and receive a report.  You can alter the quality of the digital films by right clicking the mouse, just as we do when we edit pictures.

Our ultrasound can peer into the organs and workings of the heart, just as x rays have always assessed the bones and shapes of the organs. Our in-house laboratory can give an organ “report card” assessing the health of the red and white blood cells, liver, kidneys, thyroid gland, and pancreas. After taking blood, those results can be ready in an hour.

The term “holistic” used to infer natural healing practices. These days, the holistic treatment of a patient really means that we consider the animal as an individual.  Each pet may need a different approach to solve medical problems. In the “holistic” approach, we consider exercise, obesity, vaccinations, flea control, ingredients in the diet, and medication of each pet. A pet may need to lose weight, eat differently, need medication, or a different schedule of flea control or vaccinations to feel their best.

Therapies like acupuncture and chiropractic are now more commonly used on animals to relieve muscle strain and the pain of arthritis. In fact, our clinic has invested in a “cold laser” to help animals with pain and other medical conditions. The K-laser uses focused infrared light waves to increase circulation and healing in inflamed areas. Like acupuncture, it helps the body do its job with less or no medication! This therapy is excellent for dogs and cats that are sensitive to pain medication, are older, or for those owners that would like to try a “drug free” pain treatment.

There are tons of articles on the effects of diet on health. The overwhelming number of choices in the pet store is proof of changing ideas about nutrition for our pets. I used to treat bowel problems, skin problems, and ear infections in dogs with some mention of diet, medication, and flea control. Now I make sure that owners receive nutritional counseling for almost every medical issue. Changing the diet may not always help, but when it does; it helps prevent needless suffering and endless medication for itching, sore ears, chronic diarrhea, and other medical problems. I’ll give you a couple nutritional tips. Wheat gluten is commercial food and treats may cause itching, ear problems, and diarrhea. However, it isn’t uncommon for an owner to buy a decent commercial “grain free” food, then to feed biscuits, dental chews, or even “pill pockets” filled with wheat. Changing the food won’t help, unless all food, biscuits, and treats are considered. If you change to a “grain free” diet to help with chronic medical , issues, you need to know the ingredients of everything the patient eats! Salmon and sweet potato commercial food has helped me clear up many ear, skin, and diarrhea problems in dogs.

 If you are interested in learning more about nutrition or even home cooking for your dog or cat, check out my website.  http://dogdishdiet.com/order-now 

Dr. Greg’s Dog Dish Diet

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Living With and Training Assistance Dogs

NEADS Graduation celebration

Graduation at NEADS!

I don’t need to tell you that dogs and humans share a special bond. Many species work alongside us, and many species live with us, but dogs occupy both of those roles like no other animal on earth.

Assistance dogs take that role to an entirely new level though. These dogs help people with a wide range of disabilities while quite naturally becoming their companions too.

In Another Language, Portraits of Assistance Dogs and Their People author Jeanne Braham, along with photographer Robert Floyd, present twelve oral histories from people that work with or are partners with assistance dogs. These deeply personal stories provide you with a unique window into the bonds that form between the dogs and the people working and living with them.

Bob Swain and Waldo

Bob Swain and Waldo

The combination of Mr. Floyd’s photos with first person stories bring you right "into the room" with the book’s subjects as they tell you their story. I was initially (as in before I started actually reading) a little put-off at the idea of oral histories since I have read books in the past where that format didn’t really work for me, but in this book it really is perfect. I have read plenty of descriptions of the work that assistance dogs but these individual stories, told in the first person, convey the impact these dogs have on the storyteller’s lives in a uniquely personal way.

The book centers around National Education for Assistance Dog Services (NEADS). NEADS trains assistance dogs for people who are deaf or have hearing loss, people with balance and stability issues, people with a physical disabilities, combat veterans in need of assistance dogs, teachers, ministers and therapists, and children on the autism spectrum and or with physical disabilities. The majority of their dogs are also initially trained by inmates in New England prisons. (How cool is that?)

Puppies from NEADS

Suzanne Goodwin with her puppies.

Most of the interviews are with people who have dogs from NEADS, but several of the people in the book are also employees and volunteers, including a great chapter from a breeder of Labradoodles who is donating a dog (the first of her line) to NEADS at the time of the interview. As well as interviews with trainers and program administrators.

Beth Lewis, a psychologist who both teaches and also still does therapy, works with Grace. Grace was bred for assistance, but orthopedic issues made her unsuitable for service. However, NEADS staff was able to find her a very productive role in help Beth in her work. Grace’s story of how she has undergone multiple surgeries while still helping Beth in her practice is both fascinating and truly inspirational.

Jake Liptak is an inmate handler and has raised three puppies as of his interview. He explains how inmates are able to enter the program and then provides us with an interesting rundown of what behaviors the puppies are trained for.

NEADS program has had to change the past few years with the very large number of veterans returning to the U.S with serious injuries. Sheila O’Brien, who joined NEADS in 1978, worked her way to CEO in 2009, and then left that role to work as a director with America’s VetDogs explains some of the history of NEADS’ assistance program for combat veterans and how their program had to adjust to the veteran’s different needs. In that same chapter there is also an interview with veteran Kevin Lambert.

Another Language, Portraits of Assistance Dogs and Their People is more than just a book about assistance dogs. It's book of stories about the dogs, the people, and the programs that make up NEADS. Together these stories come together to reveal a larger story of how these dogs bring different people together to help each other, whether they came to NEADS for a dog or to work with a dog.

This is a book that belongs on the shelf of any dog enthusiast. Go get it!

Living With and Training Assistance Dogs is a post written by . You can see the actual post at Dog Training in Bergen County New Jersey

     

Related Stories

 


Dog Spelled Forward Website and Blog

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Dr Greg’s 11 Practical Home Remedies for Dogs and Cats

It’s unnerving enough…just finding out that your dog or cat is swollen somewhere that it shouldn’t be, shaking and scratching at its painful ears, sneezing blood, holding up a sore leg, yelping in pain when you pick it up or move its head, acting listless, puking, scratching itchy skin until it’s raw, straining, suffering from runny diarrhea with spots of blood in it…and, well, bleeding from anywhere. The only thing worse is when you realize it is after clinic hours and you may have to seek emergency care. You may think it’s time to panic. Maybe it is and maybe it isn’t. 

  I’ve got some advice and rules of thumb that may help you to help your dog or cat…until you can get in to see your regular vet.

First, let me stress that if your pet seems to be very sick, in pain, or bleeding profusely there is no decision to make. Call and seek help immediately. If it’s after hours, however, prepare yourself for a much more expensive veterinary visit. Emergency clinics are staffed nights, holidays and weekends with veterinarians that specialize in trauma and critical care, along with a full staff of technicians and veterinary assistants, all of whom provide treatment and monitoring all night or weekend long. That’s good news when your sick or injured pet needs immediate help!

The bad news is, it will cost you anywhere from a minimum of $ 200 to several $ 1000—even if what you thought was a serious problem….isn’t. If the symptoms are not obviously life threatening, here are two options you may consider:

1.If you are unsure of the severity of the condition, you may get an exam at the emergency clinic and delay expensive treatment until your vet opens the next day (when the same treatment may be less costly),   

2. If you are reasonably sure that the condition is mild, not too uncomfortable for your pet, and treatment could wait a few hours or even a day, you could administer some home first aid. This guide—while not a diagnostic tool—lists some safe medications you can administer for temporary relief. 

WARNING: While some over-the-counter medication can provide your pet with temporary relief, you need to be very careful NOT to give your dog or cat Tylenol (acetaminophen is the generic form) or ibuprofen. And while dogs can have aspirin (see dosage recommendations in 5, below) do NOT give aspirin to your cat. Pain relievers for cats are best purchased from your vet.

Here’s the link!

Dr Greg’s 11 Practical Home Remedies for Dogs and Cats

Dr. Greg’s Dog Dish Diet

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Latest Pet Healthy Teeth News

Gary The Capybara Lives A Dog's Life Despite Being A Rodent (VIDEO)
"The first one was a very healthy and normal one," she told Rex USA. "However, the second one surprised me. With a further look I was surprised to find that the lamb only has two legs." The family thought the lamb wouldn't survive, but it proved its
Read more on Huffington Post

Report shows dozens of pets injured, killed during flights
A pit bull en route from Charlotte to Atlanta mauled himself, biting through the crate and causing bruising to his face, torn nails and missing teeth. In a case of a dog en route to Orlando, it was killed when it escaped onto the runway. Humane Society
Read more on WSB Atlanta

What's that smell? Check with vet to diagnose pet odors
Chewing raw meat bones is another good way to keep healthy teeth. Ears: Ear infections cause lots of odors. Lift your pet's ear and take a whiff. If you smell something foul, head to the vet. Lots of clients waste money trying to mask ear odors or
Read more on Ellwood City Ledger

Posted in Pet Care Media | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Vampire Holds Free Halloween Prank Seminar

True American Dog

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

NSAIDs for Pain Relief Can Cause Problems if Used Together or in Sensitive Animals

We are all interested in reducing pain and inflammation in our pets when it is necessary. Pharmaceutical companies have come up with a variety of medications that help do just that. The downside is that there are a few harmful side effects in a few sensitive animals. Anti-inflammatory drug types are in classes related to aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, and cortisone. Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) include the aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen types.

Prednisone is not an NSAID but an anti-inflammatory drug used for allergic reactions, autoimmune problems, and painful chronic joint conditions. I use a cortisone injection and oral prednisone to help with painful itchy skin and ear conditions, severe bowel conditions, and painful joints. I always try to “pulse” the cortisone and prednisone when needed for a few days to a maximum of 2 weeks. It’s always best to use the smallest dose of cortisone every other day to control allergies, chronic diarrhea, or achy joints due to arthritis of old age. A client weaned her German shepherd down to just 5-10 mg every other day to control symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease or food allergy. She used the Prednisone after trying a multitude of foods and home cooking. Her dog weighed 70 pounds and a normal dose of cortisone would usually be at least 20-40 mg once to twice daily for that weight.

From that experience, I realized that the dosage of any pain medication needed (NSAID or steroid like prednisone) may be ultimately dependent on the problem and the individual’s response to the drug. If less medication helps with pain relief, the less chance of side effects!

This is especially important with NSAIDS like aspirin, Rimadyl, Deramaxx, Previcox, Etogesic, Metacam, and the generic forms of these drugs. The warning label for all NSAIDS are  similar and sounds like this.

The most common side effect of NSAIDs is stomach upset, but stomach ulcers may develop, in which case you may see loss of appetite; vomiting; diarrhea; dark, tarry, or bloody stools; or constipation. Side effects involving the kidney include increased thirst and urination, or changes in the urine color or smell. Liver-related side effects include jaundice (yellowing of the gums, skin, or eyes). Other side effects may include pale gums, lethargy, shedding, in-coordination, seizures, or behavioral changes. If any of these side effects are observed, stop treatment and contact your veterinarian.

Liver problems can be serious in sensitive dogs(especially labs)

These drugs are really good for a pet in pain, but remember that they can cause serious side effects in sensitive animals. I often use less than the recommended dose or split the dosage up into twice daily doses for a few days to see how the drug works on a particular patient.

NSAIDS seem to cause the most side effects in stressed animals, especially those recovering from surgery. Surgical patients are commonly given the maximum,  24 hour,   “surgical dose” injection of Rimadyl. I have been giving my surgical patients half that dosage.( the regular twice daily dosage of Rimadyl) I feel that it makes more sense to use a dose that will reduce pain and can be repeated in 12 hours.

NSAIDS work by stopping inflammation-causing prostaglandins present in all cells.  Not all prostaglandins cause inflammation. Some prostaglandins are necessary to prevent acid build up in the stomach and help with normal kidney function (The “happy” types of prostaglandins  are called Cox-1 types, while the “painful or inflammatory” prostaglandin types are called Cox-2). Some NSAIDS can alter the normal balance of the prostaglandins (decrease the happy type needed for a healthy stomach and kidneys) and cause ulcers, kidney problems, or bleeding. NSAIDS more active with stopping Cox-2 prostaglandins are better at pain relief without side effects. For example, aspirin (which stops both prostaglandins) may lower  the “happy”  prostaglandin in the stomach cells causing ulcers. (Remember, prostaglandins are in every cell and have jobs!). This account isn’t entirely biochemically correct but in general describes the scenario.

That being said, NSAIDS are still one of the most common drugs used in veterinary medicine. There are several things you can do to make sure that your pet is not one of the rare patients that will have problems.

Make sure your vet knows about any other medication you have used before starting a course of NSAIDS. Switching from one NSAID to another may need a break of several days to 2 weeks to prevent problems. If a patient has received aspirin or prednisone, NSAIDS and surgery could cause problems. One or two doses of aspirin may not cause concern, but if the patient is older, sensitive, or stressed, two different NSAIDS in a short period of time could cause side effects.

Giving a break between prednisone and other NSAIDS is called the “washout period” to give the stomach, kidneys, liver, and clotting system a breather between different drugs. The body may need a rest between prednisone,aspirin, and the start of NSAIDS. ( Your vet will be able to tell you how much time, if any, to wait between drugs) Your pets sensitivity and reaction to a new NSAID may be more about them as individuals, not the combination. The real facts are really not known. Some literature says 24 hours , 72 hours , and up to two weeks between different drugs!

Try to use the lowest dose that will give relief. In cases of chronic pain you may be able to use the medication daily or every other day instead of twice daily.

Stop giving the drugs if there is nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, jaundice, or other signs or not feeling good!

Fish oils’ omega-3 fatty acids have an anti-inflammatory effect involving the production of protective instead of inflammatory prostaglandins. Using fish oil may help decrease inflammation as well as help nourish the skin!

Remember: Dogs with arthritis need to be on the thin side and may benefit from glucosamine/chondroitin supplements , raw meaty bones, or slow cooked bones and cartilage. Weight loss and a better diet may decrease the need for NSAIDS!

If you want to know more about feeding a better diet, helping dogs with itchy skin, helping cats lose weight, ear problems, seizures, or chronic bowel issues, check out Dog Dish Diet and Feed Your Pet to Avoid the Vet at http://dogdishdiet.com/order-now . Dog Dish Diet talks about helping medical problems with better ingredients and Feed Your Pet teaches you how to easily and economically slow cook food for your dog and cat.(Feed Your Pet also has nutritional tips for your cat)

Dr. Greg’s Dog Dish Diet

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Nice Pet Healthy Teeth photos

Check out these pet healthy teeth images:

What’s New at the National Zoo this Spring
pet healthy teeth

Image by Smithsonian’s National Zoo
Photo Credit: Jim Jenkins, Smithsonian’s National Zoo

In this photo: Guam rail chick

Visitors strolling through the Smithsonian’s National Zoo one of these beautiful spring days will see a variety of baby animals, some new faces and enjoy an entirely new food experience. Below are just a few of the new critters and experiences visitors can expect. More than 30 animal demonstrations take place every day in which visitors can encounter fascinating creatures and chat with keepers about the Zoo’s conservation efforts. To view the demonstration schedule, visit nationalzoo.si.edu/Visit/DailyPrograms/.

1.Baby Bird Bonanza Catch a glimpse of some of the world’s most endangered birds and their chicks up-close at the Bird House. A baby boom officially began March 7 when a brown kiwi hatched from his shell. The Zoo’s flock soon expanded to include a wattled crane, two Guam rails, three rheas and two sunbittern chicks. They’re growing fast, so bird watchers should plan to visit the Bird House in the next few weeks. Soon, the wattled crane chick will be six feet tall!

2.See Some Impressive Tortoises For the first time in its history, the Reptile Discovery Center will exhibit impressed tortoises. Not much is known about these reptiles, so Zoo biologists will study their growth and behavior. The two sub-adult males sport golden brown and black patterned shells, but this beauty has also made them vulnerable to extinction. Along with habitat loss, the pet trade contributes to the population decline of impressed tortoises in their native Thailand, Malaysia and Vietnam.

3.Zoo-perior Food An entirely new dining experience awaits visitors at the National Zoo thanks to its new food partner, Sodexo. Cafés and concession stands will serve a wide variety of authentic ethnic cuisines, as well as healthier versions of traditional favorites. What’s more, ingredients are local, seasonal and sustainable. The menus for six food service stations are available on the Zoo’s website.

4.New Neighbors at the Cheetah Conservation Station Two young scimitar-horned oryx named Sweeney and Omar are the newest residents at the Zoo’s African savanna exhibit. These large desert antelope sport horns that are several feet long and resemble a long, curved scimitar—a type of Arabian sword. The half-brothers were born at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Va., last year. Native to northern Africa, scimitar-horned Oryx are considered extinct in the wild by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

5.The Inside Story For an in-depth perspective on why animals behave the way they do, stop by the Small Mammal House this May and check out its new exhibit: “The Inside Story.” Learn how anteaters eat without any teeth, how a Prevost squirrel nimbly jumps from branch to branch, and more. Artifacts and x-rays of animals’ skulls, muscles, and tails will show visitors how adaptations help animals survive in a changing world.

Visitors are encouraged to take public transportation to the National Zoo. Parking lots fill up by mid-morning and then free up early afternoon during spring and summer. Last admittance to the Zoo is 7 p.m. To reserve a parking space 48 hours in advance, call Friends of the National Zoo Guest Services at 202-633-4486 between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. Parking reservation fees of for FONZ members and for nonmembers apply.

# # #

What’s New at the National Zoo this Spring
pet healthy teeth

Image by Smithsonian’s National Zoo
Photo Credit: Gil Myers, Smithsonian’s National Zoo

In this photo: scimitar-horned oryx

Visitors strolling through the Smithsonian’s National Zoo one of these beautiful spring days will see a variety of baby animals, some new faces and enjoy an entirely new food experience. Below are just a few of the new critters and experiences visitors can expect. More than 30 animal demonstrations take place every day in which visitors can encounter fascinating creatures and chat with keepers about the Zoo’s conservation efforts. To view the demonstration schedule, visit nationalzoo.si.edu/Visit/DailyPrograms/.

1.Baby Bird Bonanza Catch a glimpse of some of the world’s most endangered birds and their chicks up-close at the Bird House. A baby boom officially began March 7 when a brown kiwi hatched from his shell. The Zoo’s flock soon expanded to include a wattled crane, two Guam rails, three rheas and two sunbittern chicks. They’re growing fast, so bird watchers should plan to visit the Bird House in the next few weeks. Soon, the wattled crane chick will be six feet tall!

2.See Some Impressive Tortoises For the first time in its history, the Reptile Discovery Center will exhibit impressed tortoises. Not much is known about these reptiles, so Zoo biologists will study their growth and behavior. The two sub-adult males sport golden brown and black patterned shells, but this beauty has also made them vulnerable to extinction. Along with habitat loss, the pet trade contributes to the population decline of impressed tortoises in their native Thailand, Malaysia and Vietnam.

3.Zoo-perior Food An entirely new dining experience awaits visitors at the National Zoo thanks to its new food partner, Sodexo. Cafés and concession stands will serve a wide variety of authentic ethnic cuisines, as well as healthier versions of traditional favorites. What’s more, ingredients are local, seasonal and sustainable. The menus for six food service stations are available on the Zoo’s website.

4.New Neighbors at the Cheetah Conservation Station Two young scimitar-horned oryx named Sweeney and Omar are the newest residents at the Zoo’s African savanna exhibit. These large desert antelope sport horns that are several feet long and resemble a long, curved scimitar—a type of Arabian sword. The half-brothers were born at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Va., last year. Native to northern Africa, scimitar-horned Oryx are considered extinct in the wild by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

5.The Inside Story For an in-depth perspective on why animals behave the way they do, stop by the Small Mammal House this May and check out its new exhibit: “The Inside Story.” Learn how anteaters eat without any teeth, how a Prevost squirrel nimbly jumps from branch to branch, and more. Artifacts and x-rays of animals’ skulls, muscles, and tails will show visitors how adaptations help animals survive in a changing world.

Visitors are encouraged to take public transportation to the National Zoo. Parking lots fill up by mid-morning and then free up early afternoon during spring and summer. Last admittance to the Zoo is 7 p.m. To reserve a parking space 48 hours in advance, call Friends of the National Zoo Guest Services at 202-633-4486 between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. Parking reservation fees of for FONZ members and for nonmembers apply.

# # #

What’s New at the National Zoo this Spring
pet healthy teeth

Image by Smithsonian’s National Zoo
Photo Credit: Jim Jenkins, Smithsonian’s National Zoo

In this photo: Guam rail chick

Visitors strolling through the Smithsonian’s National Zoo one of these beautiful spring days will see a variety of baby animals, some new faces and enjoy an entirely new food experience. Below are just a few of the new critters and experiences visitors can expect. More than 30 animal demonstrations take place every day in which visitors can encounter fascinating creatures and chat with keepers about the Zoo’s conservation efforts. To view the demonstration schedule, visit nationalzoo.si.edu/Visit/DailyPrograms/.

1.Baby Bird Bonanza Catch a glimpse of some of the world’s most endangered birds and their chicks up-close at the Bird House. A baby boom officially began March 7 when a brown kiwi hatched from his shell. The Zoo’s flock soon expanded to include a wattled crane, two Guam rails, three rheas and two sunbittern chicks. They’re growing fast, so bird watchers should plan to visit the Bird House in the next few weeks. Soon, the wattled crane chick will be six feet tall!

2.See Some Impressive Tortoises For the first time in its history, the Reptile Discovery Center will exhibit impressed tortoises. Not much is known about these reptiles, so Zoo biologists will study their growth and behavior. The two sub-adult males sport golden brown and black patterned shells, but this beauty has also made them vulnerable to extinction. Along with habitat loss, the pet trade contributes to the population decline of impressed tortoises in their native Thailand, Malaysia and Vietnam.

3.Zoo-perior Food An entirely new dining experience awaits visitors at the National Zoo thanks to its new food partner, Sodexo. Cafés and concession stands will serve a wide variety of authentic ethnic cuisines, as well as healthier versions of traditional favorites. What’s more, ingredients are local, seasonal and sustainable. The menus for six food service stations are available on the Zoo’s website.

4.New Neighbors at the Cheetah Conservation Station Two young scimitar-horned oryx named Sweeney and Omar are the newest residents at the Zoo’s African savanna exhibit. These large desert antelope sport horns that are several feet long and resemble a long, curved scimitar—a type of Arabian sword. The half-brothers were born at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Va., last year. Native to northern Africa, scimitar-horned Oryx are considered extinct in the wild by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

5.The Inside Story For an in-depth perspective on why animals behave the way they do, stop by the Small Mammal House this May and check out its new exhibit: “The Inside Story.” Learn how anteaters eat without any teeth, how a Prevost squirrel nimbly jumps from branch to branch, and more. Artifacts and x-rays of animals’ skulls, muscles, and tails will show visitors how adaptations help animals survive in a changing world.

Visitors are encouraged to take public transportation to the National Zoo. Parking lots fill up by mid-morning and then free up early afternoon during spring and summer. Last admittance to the Zoo is 7 p.m. To reserve a parking space 48 hours in advance, call Friends of the National Zoo Guest Services at 202-633-4486 between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. Parking reservation fees of for FONZ members and for nonmembers apply.

# # #

Posted in Pet Care Media | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Gunja – and bone

Gunja is a cross between a Boxer and a Golden Retriever. She’s the sweetest, gentlest dog and lives in the village of Gorbio.  Here you see her chewing a bone at the recent Meschiou (sheep roast picnic) – yes, the dogs eat as well as the people: there was a large dish of lamb and lamb bones, just for the dogs! 

Gunja, is very polite -  here she greets friends at one of the tables. And with her owner and new baby, she says Hello to Gunilla and Alice. 

RIVIERA DOGS

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged , | Leave a comment