Scaredy cat

‘No chihuahuas were hurt in the making of this photo!’ 

Ears back,  this little cutie is a bit scared.  But come back tomorrow and see her in a totally different frame of mind.
RIVIERA DOGS

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Thank you Veterans

Dogs have been members of the military for many, many years, but they weren’t always seen as soldiers. At least to the leadership.

During the Vietnam War, when the troops withdrew, the dogs were left behind as ‘surplus equipment.’ To this day, that fact haunts many of their handlers, who knew without a doubt that these loyal canines were nothing short of soldiers themselves.

It is not an easy job. More than 500 dogs are deployed serving the military at any given time. They protect, serve, give emotional support, and sometimes die in the line of duty. Up to 5% of canines are thought to suffer a canine form of post-traumatic stress syndrome.

Fortunately today, attitudes towards military dogs have changed. Military canines are recognized as fellow soldiers, who are treated when injured, retired when done with their work, and thanked for the sacrifices they make without complaint.

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I met Hero Dog Gabe at the 2013 Rose Parade. He has since passed, but not without leaving a wonderful legacy.

Our veterans give so much and are so humble about what they go through in service to the country. I have so much respect for the sacrifices they and their families make every day. One day doesn’t seem like nearly enough to honor you.

Thank you, to the men, women, and canines of the armed forces.

If you’d like to see some amazing images, check out NatGeo’s Dogs of War gallery.

Pawcurious: With Veterinarian and Author Dr. V

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I’ve Got Thick Skin, and a Fuzzy Heart

I was certain when I had kids that my motherhood chip would finally kick in, that I would finally start to react to babies the way I reacted to dogs and cats. Because surely that maternal instinct in my heart had merely been misdirected all these years, and was simply in need of a little oxytocin and fine-tuning to point it to the appropriate species upon which I should lavish my affection.

Now my kids are 11 and 9 and I can say this with absolute certainty: not so much.

Don’t get me wrong: I love my kids, I love being their mom, and I couldn’t imagine my life without them. Well, I could, especially on certain days when the attitude is dialed to 11, but I much prefer it the way things are.

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My daughter was helping clean up after Emmett when she was 5. I’d say this reflects brilliantly on my parenting but her desire to help lasted till she was about 6. :)

As in, I don’t want more kiddos and never have. When my friends go into Babies R Us to pick out a shower gift, they sigh and say, “Don’t you miss those days?”

And I, inspecting the newest Diaper Genie version and wondering if it would work for cat litter, reply honestly: “No.” I was exhausted and overwhelmed the entire time from 2004-2011 or so.

When I see a pregnant woman waddling by and others remark on her glow, I think about how sweaty she must be, or if her bladder hurts as much as mine did, or if she has complete strangers lift their hands up in shock and go “WHOA!” when she turns around in her ninth month of pregnancy with a 9 pound son and they get a glimpse of the battleship of an abdomen.

Motherhood has changed me in some ways: I look at people’s new babies and I smile. But I don’t need to hold them. I am so, so, SOOOOOO much more compassionate about people with babies on planes. I hold doors for parents with strollers trying to get through. That sort of thing. And I look upon it with nostalgia, but not a lick of longing. No pun intended.

When I was getting my hair done a while back, a woman came in with a duckling. I lost my head at the cuteness and almost lost my hair too because I kept jumping out of the chair to squee. I went home and tried to get my husband, once more, to agree to raising a couple chickens (he said no.)

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A woman at my gym brings her chihuahua in on occasion. I never get anything done when she does. (My husband has also said no to a chihuahua.)

The point is less that he said no to more animals and more the fact that I want them, the way I imagine some mothers must see a baby sleeping in a stroller and say to herself, “Oh, I wish I just had one more.”

This morning as I was walking by a cafe, I spotted a family with a black lab sitting at a table about 50 feet away. The dog and I locked eyes, and before I knew it I was on the ground laughing getting dog kisses as the family grinned. I don’t remember how many people there were or what they looked like but the dog was a boy, black labrador, about 50 pounds, with a blocky head and the tiniest bit of grey peeking around his muzzle. He is 9, his name is Brock, and he likes to lay down with his legs splayed behind him.

As I lamented about my hopelessness to my friend Jen, she remarked, “You just have a fuzzy heart is all.” And I think she’s right.

I’m also pretty sure it’s genetic.

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Tending to Brody on the day of his pinnectomy.

 

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I have a theory. I think that when we get a pet, they grab a piece of our heart and give us a bit of theirs in return. It’s how we will find them on the other side. And the older I get, the more pieces get replaced; my heart is getting furrier and furrier, and it’s made not only of my own pets but the clients I adore, my friends’ animals I have loved, the strangers like Brock who know just where to find it.

 

Pawcurious: With Veterinarian and Author Dr. V

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Take a Bite: CPK launches its 'Next Chapter'

Take a Bite: CPK launches its 'Next Chapter'
… worlds: baby kale, thin-sliced Bosc pears, roasted butternut squash, spiced pecans, goat cheese and cranberries for the greenies, and add-ons of, pictured, your choice of salmon, shrimp or chicken (below), for those with one foot still in the
Read more on Honolulu Pulse

Vermont GlobalFoundries employees have weeks to decide to leave
High electricity and heating for homes. Low wages and no benefits. Taxes and Schools. Blackmail health premiums. The Dirtocrats and Regressives have done no favors to this state, and then there is the Politically correct, Trust funders, Greenies and
Read more on Watchdog.org

Clinton Wants A 700 Percent Increase In Solar Power. Anyone Have 0 Billion?
There's also the effect that solar farms will have on wildlife; something that greenies also fuss about regarding the fight to save humanity from the non-threat of global warming. These farms have been documented to literally fry birds out of the sky.
Read more on Town Hall

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Top 5 Ways Being a Vet Prepared Me for Parenthood

It took me a good decade, but I can finally say I think I’m getting this motherhood thing figured out. It was not intuitive for me, not easy or instantly amazing the way it was when I brought home my first pet. With my animals, I knew no matter how challenging things were, we would figure it out and it would be ok. I don’t know why I lacked that confidence with the kiddos. Maybe I’m just part dog.

But no matter! We all have our strengths in life, but the one thing I wish I knew a lot earlier was the idea of resilience, that just because one thing comes naturally to us, it doesn’t mean we can’t take on other things and work our way up to competence. It’s too late for me now: I will never know if I could have been a decent volleyball player. All I know is I was horrrrrrrible at it in school, I dreaded volleyball days in PE, and as soon as I could give it up I did.

But parenthood isn’t like volleyball, a hobby you can dabble in and put away when your back hurts. It’s there, sink or swim, and even if all you do is hobble along, well, that’s all you need to do.

I found myself leaning on my veterinary experience quite a bit those first few years, actually. You draw on your own experiences, so it makes sense. I was actually pleasantly surprised at how many things I learned from the clinic that I could apply to parenthood:

TOP 5 WAYS

1. Your brain can adapt to an obscene level of noise.

Barking dogs, screaming babies, howling cats, ringing phones, all can be intercepted before they hit your cerebrum by some amazing subconscious mom-filter that allows you to get your records completed or bills done. While others may think you oblivious, the truth is you are an amazing compartmentalizer.

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2. Multitasking is an art.

Mrs. Jones is on line 3 and will only speak to you, and she insists she will hold. The cat in room 4 is having a seizure. The man in the lobby is yelling at the receptionist about his dog’s worms, something is bleeding in the treatment area but we don’t know who, and you’re still scrubbed into surgery. Getting used to this level of chaos is the only reason I was able to survive the first years of classroom volunteering, PTA politics, work, groceries, and remembering my husband’s name.

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3. Blood and poop are things you can get used to.

I don’t think I even need to elaborate on this, do I?

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4. The ones who scream the loudest are not the ones you worry about.

If you’re screaming, you’re breathing. It’s the quiet ones you need to check in on, because it usually means one of three things: they stopped breathing, they are getting in a large amount of trouble, or they are about to have a nuclear meltdown. This rule applies to both pets and their owners. And, I learned, to kids.

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5. You don’t need to be the best at something. You just need to want it the most.

In a clinic full of creatures without opposable thumbs, it was astonishing to find out how good some of them could get at accomplishments they weren’t supposed to be capable of. Like, how some dogs could patiently sit in a cage for hours and work at a jiggly lever in order to release themselves and merrily run around the treatment area. Or how some cats could push a jar of treats, centimeter by centimeter, all the way across a table until it dumped its chicken-y contents on the floor. They do it because no one told them they couldn’t.

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To me this last one is the most important lesson of all. I remind myself of this often, for myself and for my kids. I don’t want them to be the kid who stops trying to open the cage. I want them to be the one who takes the whole thing apart.

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I learned, more than anything, to be this dog. :)

Pawcurious: With Veterinarian and Author Dr. V

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Saturday Survey: Puppy Bowl XII

Are you ready for tomorrow’s big game? Until next time, Good day, and good dog!


Doggies.com Dog Blog

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Dental implant giants Dentsply, Straumann mull potential deal for Israeli

Dental implant giants Dentsply, Straumann mull potential deal for Israeli
Hot on the trail of dental device acquisitions, dental implant giants Straumann and Dentsply International ($ XRAY) are reportedly weighing a deal for Israel's MIS Implants Technologies. Nothing is set in stone but MIS' owner, buyout firm TA Associate
Read more on FierceMedicalDevices (press release) (registration)

New Year, New You: Accessible Dental
Miner is the only dentist on the island who has use of a cone-beam scanner, a 3-D scanning unit that provides a clearer picture of problems that could be brewing beneath the surface, including bone loss. To read the complete New Year, New You profile
Read more on Nantucket Island Inquirer

Water Fluoridation: Good or Bad?
For the purpose of increasing oral health in communities where people don't have equal access to dental work, the fluoridation of water (or adding fluoride to the public water supply) is a common practice. However … Page 2 of 2 – Aside from
Read more on Newton Kansan

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Attila the gentle Drahthaar

Deutsch Drahthaars are most common gundog breed in the German-speaking world, and they are used on a wide variety of game.

But this one is a gentle soul, who dotes on all sorts of animals that his kind normally hunt.

 

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Natural History

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Hitler’s deer friends

Hitler feeding some roe deer, 1936.

Obersalzberg/Hitler füttert Rehe,um 1936 - Obersalzberg/Hitler feeding deer,abt. 36 -

Good thing these deer met the animal-loving Hitler and not Goering, who probably would have shot them!

I am aware that Western roe deer are found throughout Europe, but I most strongly associate them with Germany for some reason.

 


Natural History

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Led by Marlena Cutura, Pope John Paul II girls edge Newman; Newman boys roll

Led by Marlena Cutura, Pope John Paul II girls edge Newman; Newman boys roll
Pope John Paul II, which both tied and defeated the Greenies last season, notched a 2-1, nondistrict win on a sunny Saturday morning at Newman's Lupin Field. The game almost certainly will have playoff seeding implications. PJP is fourth in the most
Read more on The New Orleans Advocate

Ira Winderman: To Riley, durability is key to unlocking Heat
"Greenies" actually were amphetamines, replaced now from Birdman's coffee to various energy drinks. But pharmacology wasn't Riley's point. His point was: get out there. "I am so proud of Dwyane and the way he has led and the fact that he's playing
Read more on Sun Sentinel

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