Dr. Chris Stevens Takes Advantage of Dental Hygiene Month by Educating Sun Prairie, WI Residents on the Benefits of Laser Dentistry


Sun Prairie, WI (PRWEB) October 23, 2014

In honor of Dental Hygiene Month, Dr. Chris Stevens wants to educate patients on the symptoms of periodontal disease and new treatment options available for patients in Sun Prairie, WI. A state-of-the-art laser gum surgery procedure, offered by Dr. Stevens, has made it easier than ever for patients to fight the disease, and regain a healthy smile. Recognizing the symptoms of gum disease is the first step to improving oral health. Symptoms may include swollen or tender gums, receding gums, bleeding gums, chronic bad breath, and loose teeth.

Until recently, gum disease treatment has been very invasive, requiring the cutting and suturing of gum grafts. Traditional gum disease treatment also required a huge time commitment on the part of the patient. With the minimally invasive DEKA Smart CO2 laser, Dr. Stevens is able to treat gum disease with little bleeding, swelling or discomfort. The laser, which targets diseased cells, leaves healthy gum tissue intact and encourages new bone and tissue growth.

Research shows that people who brush their teeth twice daily for two minutes have significantly fewer cases of gum disease and dental cavities. In addition to proper brushing, daily flossing or some sort of interdental cleaning has also been shown to significantly decrease the instance of gum disease and dental decay. Using anti-bacterial mouthwash and chewing sugar-free gum has also been shown to improve oral health by removing plaque and bacteria missed by brushing and flossing.

The DEKA laser uses a CO2 wavelength which has been shown to be very effective when working with soft tissue, such as gums. In addition to gum disease treatment, Dr. Stevens also uses the DEKA laser in cosmetic and implant dentistry. It is also used for the treatment and removal of oral growths, cold sores, and mouth ulcers, without scalpels or stitches.

Patients suffering with the symptoms of periodontal disease in Sun Prairie, WI are encouraged to take advantage of Dental Hygiene Month by scheduling a consultation with Dr. Stevens. To learn more about gum disease, the DEKA Smart CO2 laser, and the dental services available at Dr. Chris Stevens Family & Cosmetic Dentistry, patients are encouraged to visit http://www.drchrisstevens.com or call (608) 837-4880.

About the Doctor

Dr. Chris Stevens Family & Cosmetic Dentistry is a general practice that provides personalized dental care for patients in Sun Prairie, WI. Dr. Chris Stevens graduated from Marquette School of Dentistry and has been practicing in Sun Prairie, WI since 1982. He utilizes the latest dental technology and techniques in his services in order to deliver a superior standard of patient care. Dr. Stevens is among the first group of dentists in the country to undergo the training required to perform the Chao Pinhole Surgical Technique?, a minimally invasive alternative to traditional gum grafting surgery. To learn more about the dental services available at Dr. Chris Stevens Family & Cosmetic Dentistry, please visit http://www.drchrisstevens.com or call (608) 837-4880.







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Know the Facts before you Adopt a Seizure Assistance Dog

We all know that dogs are great friends. They bring a smile to our face after a long day’s work or when we are feeling low. Dogs are also the most preferred when it comes to choosing a service animal.

Choosing a dog is a challenge for most people as animals, like humans, have different personalities. Choosing a dog for a person with a disability or an illness is an even greater challenge. While most people know of service dogs that help people who are blind or deaf go about their daily activities with ease, few are aware of service dogs that can be life savers for those suffering from seizures.

If you are planning to get a seizure alert/response dog for a loved one, here’s what you need to know.

What is a Seizure Alert Dog?

A seizure alert dog has the ability to sense a seizure before it occurs and warn the affected person before he/she experiences it. These dogs can sense an impending seizure minutes or hours before the person shows any clinical signs of being affected with a seizure.

There is no specific answer yet as to how dogs sense seizures. Some people think that as dogs are adept at reading body language, they may be able to detect minor changes in a person’s behavior or body language that may occur before the seizure.

Other people assume that dogs may be able to detect subtle changes in body odor before a seizure. While there is no scientific proof, several people claim that their dogs display seizure alerting behavior thus giving them time to sit or lie down and preventing them from fatal injuries. Dogs who display seizure alerting behavior well in advance enable people to take medications or even call for help before the seizure occurs.

Dogs have been known to display a wide range of behaviors that can be considered as seizure alerting behaviors. Barking at the owner’s face or emitting a warning bark, pacing restlessly, licking the owner’s hands, are all considered to be seizure alerting behaviors.

Whether dogs truly can or cannot detect seizures, the fact remains that dogs cannot be trained to detect such things. However, if a dog displays such an exceptional trait, owners need to identify it and encourage it.

What is a Seizure Response Dog?

A seizure response dog may or may not be able to detect seizures before they occur. However, these dogs are able to help the person affected by a seizure in many ways. Unlike seizure alert dogs, seizure response dogs can be trained to help a person when the need arises.

A seizure response dog can help in various ways such as:

  • Retrieving medicines or a phone
  • Rolling over a person during a seizure so that he can breathe
  • Clearing the affected person’s mouth of vomit
  • Getting help by barking, by operating a pre-programmed phone, or by activating a medical alert
  • Pulling away objects that may be potentially dangerous to the person
  • Attempting to get the person into a conscious state and acting as a brace to help the person get up on his feet
  • Stopping the person from banging into objects or falling down the stairs during the postictal stage
  • Providing emotional and physical support
  • Carrying important information about the person’s health and emergency measures to be taken

A seizure response dog can be taught to stay with the affected person throughout seizures. Once a seizure ends, a person may feel disoriented. In such times, the presence of a dog can have a calming effect on the person’s mind. Furthermore, people who are affected by seizures in public settings may feel embarrassed when they recover. Having a dog by the side can help in diverting other people’s attention to the dog’s qualities.

What Breeds Are Seizure Dogs?

Golden retrievers, Samoyed crosses, German shepherds, setter mixes and many other breeds and mixes can predict, alert, or help individuals with seizure disorders. Instead of belonging to a particular breed, it is more important for a dog to be people-oriented and responsive to human feelings and emotions.

All service dogs need to be friendly and be able to stay calm in public places. Dogs that can get aggressive or over-protective of the owner, and those that are shy or nervous won’t be able to do well to help the affected individual when the need arises.

How Can One Get a Seizure Assistance Dog?

The field of training dogs specifically to act as seizure response dogs is relatively new. However, you can get in touch with service dog training programs to see if they have a dog to suit your requirements or if they can train a dog for you. You can also get in touch with personal trainers and ask if they can train a dog to be a seizure response dog. Be wary of fraudulent organizations or fraudsters who make false claims.


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I do not have Ebola (I think)

Back when it was just a foreign concept whose name was limited to public health journals and the occasional horror movie, my sister and I used to joke about Ebola. Every time we got the flu and felt like garbage we would text each other “Ugh, I have Ebola.” It was shorthand for “I feel very under the weather at the moment.”

But now that it’s finally happened, this snaking into the global population that public health experts have warned of for many years, we stopped joking about having Ebola because now we might ACTUALLY HAVE EBOLA.

I know the risks are low. They are, for now, still very low, and I am grateful for that. But it’s hard not to panic unless you turn off the TV, because all we see are bridal shops being bleached and entire school districts shutting down because someone rode on a plane with someone who might have at one point been symptomatic. My own school district just sent out an email assuring us that they have an Ebola plan in place, and we’re in San Diego, with not an exposed person to be found. Preparation is key, though, so I’m glad they are thinking of it.

I was at the doctor yesterday, for a routine sort of thing, and when they took my temperature the doctor noted it was 99.5.

“Are you feeling sick?” she asked.

“Well, I do have the tiniest bit of a sore throat, now that you mention it,” I said. “I’ve been travelling all week, and you know how that goes. I mean, I lysol that plane seat down and…” My voice trailed off as I noticed her giving me the side eye.

“Not to Dallas,” I said. “New York. No one I met had Ebola.”

“Oh, thank goodness for that,” she said. “How about West Africa?”

“No,” I said. “Do you get that a lot?”

“No,” she said.

“So you don’t think I have Ebola?” I asked, being serious.

“No,” she said.

So she gave me a flu shot instead. I had totally forgotten about the flu in the midst of this Ebolademic, to be honest. Fortunately for me, she hadn’t.

As I stood in line at the pharmacy behind an elderly emphysematics on oxygen, a guy picking up Lipitor and a diabetic purchasing insulin, I looked down at her discharge notes: take Vitamin D. Wash your hands. Get some sleep. But just to be safe, and because I want to protect my spin buddies, I decided on a self-imposed quarantine from the gym for the next 24 hours. Can’t be too careful.

 

Pawcurious: With Pet Lifestyle Expert and Veterinarian Dr. V.

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'Broke' WHO host £1.6million caviar-fuelled beano

'Broke' WHO host £1.6million caviar-fuelled beano
The Sunday Express can reveal the dinner gala, held last Monday, offered delegates Salmon carpaccio with cucumber tartar, Salmon as the main course, Vitello Tonnato beef with tuna fish sauce, Red caviar, Scallop with white wine sauce, a fish late of …
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Shopping, cooking and bonding: We're in!
For buttercream, in a small bowl, combine sugar and cream of tartar. Place egg whites in a double boiler or metal bowl over simmering water; stir in the sugar mixture. Constantly whisk egg mixture until mixture reaches 120-130 degrees. (Do not overheat
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Apr 5, Picky eater

Fostering a 5 year old min pin who does not want to eat. Very picky. Ate small amount of canned one day then refused. Ate small amount OD chicken this
Dog Food Blog | Best Dog Food Guide

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Halloween Treat! Dracula Resurrects Monster Mash

In this Halloween treat, DARA fuses stop motion animation and choreographed dance. The music video that they concoct scares up the story of the devilish dance party where The Monster Mash was…

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Apr 23, Tapioca in Dog Food | Best Dog Food Guide

Tapioca in dog food as novel starch source to use in elimination diets, to eliminate allergy symptoms, and no grain diets.
Dog Food Blog | Best Dog Food Guide

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THE CAT HOUSE ON THE KINGS

firstAt one of the nation’s largest cat rescues, the Cat House on the Kings, more than 700 cats live peacefully on 12-acres of beautiful, safe land in Parlier, Calif.

This cage-free, no-kill, lifetime sanctuary was founded in 1992 and has saved more than 24,000 cats and 7,000 dogs, plus spayed or neutered another 40,000.

Freekibble.com and Halo are proud to make regular, bi-monthly donations to The Cat House on the Kings to help support their rescue efforts.

Click here to read the complete story.

Halo

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Tartar de Salmón y Aguacate – Recetas para Navidad

En esta vídeo receta vamos a ver cómo hacer un tartar de salmón con aguacate. Una receta muy sana, fácil y rápida de preparar perfecta para esta Navidad. Esp…
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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Canine Distemper


For many years canine distemper was one of the most deadly viral diseases affecting dogs. Since the introduction of a vaccine to combat the disease, the incidence of distemper infections has dropped considerably.

Good vaccination practices in the U.S. have played a major role in the reduction of distemper cases in this country, but unfortunately, canine distemper is still a huge problem in other parts of the world.

The canine distemper virus is an RNA virus. A variation of the canine distemper virus causes measles in humans.

Canine distemper can affect dogs of any age but is more likely to affect younger puppies rather than older dogs. This may be due to an acquired immunity resulting from a canine distemper vaccination, or to exposure to the virus, resulting in the dog developing an immunity to the virus.

The wide range of clinical signs accompanying an infection of distemper often makes it very difficult to diagnose a young dog with distemper. In some dogs, a temporary fever and a lack of appetite, sudden lethargy or mild depression, are often the only signs of the onset of distemper. Some dogs infected with the distemper virus may have discharges from the nose and eyes in addition to coughing, a fever, lack of an appetite, vomiting and diarrhea. It is not uncommon for an infected dog to display some but not all of the symptoms associated with canine distemper.

Distemper infections often go undiagnosed when an owner believes the dog just has a cold or some other non-life threatening illness. The unfortunate consequence of misdiagnosing a dog’s distemper symptoms could result in the death of the dog.

Some dogs are able to survive the initial viral infection but later develop neurologic signs in one to two weeks after becoming infected. These signs include seizures, sudden and strange changes in behavior, and constantly walking in circles. Many dogs who develop neurologic signs develop rhythmic motions or twitches. Sometimes an affected dog will act as if it’s chewing on something due to continuous contractions of the head muscles. If a dog is able to survive the initial viral infection and does not display any neurologic damage, it does not mean the dog is completely in the clear. A distemper infection can also lead to retinal damage and discoloration of the dog’s cornea. Sometimes, the dog’s skin, nose and foot pads will become very hard.

There is a period of time that the virus remains dormant after a dog is infected. The clinical signs of distemper will begin to show approximately 10 to 14 days after infection. If a puppy is vaccinated against distemper but has already been infected with the virus, the vaccination will not be effective in preventing the disease.

Currently there is no specialized treatment that can kill the distemper virus. Prevention of infection is the best way to guard your puppy or dog against canine distemper. Be sure your new puppy is vaccinated at approximately 6 weeks of age. The vaccinations will need to be continued until the puppy reaches 12 to 16 weeks of age. The distemper vaccinations are given in 3 to 4 week intervals. Injection of the vaccine has to be repeated due to interference with the vaccine from antibodies in the mother’s milk being passed on to the puppies. These antibodies prevent the vaccine from being effective in about 75% of all puppies vaccinated at six weeks of age, approximately 25% of puppies vaccinated at nine weeks of age, and only a small number of puppies vaccinated at twelve weeks of age.

The follow-up vaccinations provide protection to almost all puppies who receive the vaccine.

Canine distemper virus is found in all the body secretions from an infected animal. Raccoons and skunks are often carriers of this deadly disease, so it’s a good idea to watch your dog carefully when venturing into areas where these animals are often found. Living in the city does not automatically exclude the possibility of an infected raccoon or skunk because these animals love to raid neighborhood garbage cans when foraging for food.

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