Yellow Ribbons and Wishful Thinking

For families of veterans a yellow ribbon is an article of faith. How about for dog people?

For families of veterans a yellow ribbon is an article of faith. How about for dog people?

A movement that has been making the rounds for a while now is encouraging people to place yellow ribbons on dogs that need space. "Needing space" is a euphemism for dogs that display aggressive behavior toward other dogs and/or toward people. (Labeling dogs as aggressive is bad. So we give them a different label.)

While this idea comes from a sentiment that I can certainly empathize with, I think it is not only doomed to failure but that it actually has the potential to cause more problems than it solves

Yellow Ribbons Will Never be Widely Adopted

First there’s the issue of whether or not enough people will use this to make it a reliable tool. We can’t get people to stop buying dogs from pet stores and puppy mills. We can’t get trainers to stick to science to choose and discuss their methods. (This goes for trainers on both sides of the fence by the way. "Do as I Do Dog Training?" Really? Let’s start a new training method based on a couple of studies.) Hell, we can’t even get people to agree on administering vaccinations to prevent disease in our children, let alone our dogs.

But we’re going to get people to reliably put yellow ribbons on dogs that need distance from each other?

Right. The check is in the mail too.

False Security or Denial?

Do you believe that these ribbons would be, if they somehow gained widespread adoption, a trustworthy indicator of an aggressive dog? Do you think that the absence of a ribbon would be a good indicator of a friendly dog?

Go to any conference, or even a working seminar, that allows "friendly" dogs and objectively watch the dogs that (alleged) professionals decide to bring. Chances are you’ll see at least a few that honestly do not belong there. Strike up a conversation and the rationale for bringing the dog there will be appalling…if there even is any recognition that there is a problem.

The sad fact is that denial is a very powerful force, powerful enough to make the desire to have one’s dog with oneself more important than the comfort of the dog. People, especially dog enthusiasts are terrible at self-selection when it comes to their dog’s behavior. The sad fact is a creative explanation for a dog’s behavior is often an acceptable substitute for actually addressing the problem.

And what happens when it’s possible to place a warning signal on an aggressive dog? Who’s problem is the behavior then?

Your Dog is Your Problem

Whether your dog "needs space" or not, your dog is your responsibility. Period. Placing a warning on your dog so that others can look out for her, or relying on other people to tell you that it is safe for your dog is not a good idea. Either way, you are relying on the judgement of others.

Of course many of the ribbons’ advocates are thinking “but the ribbons are only meant to serve as a warning, not as a crutch!” But that’s how they are likely to be used, and at best they are a distraction from what we need to be teaching our clients to do, as well as doing ourselves.

In situations in which you will meet dogs that you are not familiar with:

If your dog does not want to interact with other dogs, keep her away from other dogs.

If your dog does want to interact with other dogs, keep her away from other dogs.

It’s really simple, and all you need to do is look out for yourself and your dog, which is what you should be doing anyway.

Yellow Ribbons and Wishful Thinking is a post written by . You can see the actual post at Dog Training in Bergen County New Jersey

      


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Little Golden Books – For Today’s World

Little Golden Books - For Today's World

Remember ‘Little Golden Books’ from when you were a kid?  Those classic books with the golden spined covers full of wonderful stories and illustrations? They’re actually still around, and I’ve picked up a few for Essley to add to the collection of them that I still have from my own childhood.  Recently, I came across some information about an exhibit at a Los Angeles area gallery called Gallery Nucleus that featured ‘Little Golden Books’ inspired works based on popular movies, television shows, people, and characters.  Seriously though, how cool are these?!  My favorites are ‘Breaking Bad Cover’ by Maxime Mary and ‘Little Moonrise Kingdom’ by Jerrod Maruyama.   The ‘Young John Muir’ by Israel Sanchez is pretty cool too.

The exhibit ended last month, but some of the pieces of art are still available for sale on Gallery Nucleus’ website.  Which one is your favorite?

I have to give a quick shout-out to little sister Morgan, who is celebrating a birthday today.  Happy Birthday Sissy!  Essley also officially turns 3 months old today.  Today is a good day!

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From “Genetic Trash” to Happy Homes: 10 Dogs from Sochi Arrive in Washington, D.C.

Ten dogs have just finished a long trip to a new home. Thanks to Humane Society International, the dogs have been brought from Sochi, Russia, to Washington, D.C., where they’re going to be offered up for adoption.

“These 10 are representative of some of the dogs that have been removed from the streets and are now up for adoption in Sochi,” said Kelly O’Meara, from HSI. “They’re the sweetest, most interactive, very friendly dogs, very adoptable that just happen to be unfortunate enough to be living on the street.”

Humane Society International coordinated its efforts with Povodog, the dog shelter that was established just before the Winter Olympics by Russian billionaire Oleg V. Deripaska.

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A lot of things went wrong for the Russian government during this year's Olympic Games. The explosion of bad publicity that came from the revelation that the city of Sochi had targeted stray dogs for extermination was only one of them. When the city's contractor declared that the dogs were just "genetic trash," it was like dumping kerosene on the fire.

From that point on, the Sochi Winter Olympics were pretty much synonymous with dog-killing, in addition to homophobia, corruption, and abusive police tactics. The fact that people like Amanda Bird and skiier Gus Kenworthy became media darlings for rescuing dogs and taking them back to the United States only made it that much more embarrassing to Russia.

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Welcoming a new arrival to the US.

The 10 dogs who arrived in Washington this week are only a handful of the total number that were homeless in Sochi. Thanks to the relocation of Russian families during the preparation for the Winter Olympics, there were estimated to be more than 2,000 stray dogs and cats wandering the streets of Sochi before the games.

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Although individuals like Bird and Kenworthy have brought dogs back to keep themselves, these dogs are the first to come to America and be made available for open adoption. Humane Society International says it plans for more to follow.

After two days in transit, the dogs are adapting to their new surroundings.

"These dogs have had a tremendous journey. It's been almost two days of travel for them. They went from Sochi to Moscow, had a long layover in Moscow, and then the flight to Dulles airport today," O'Meara said. "And as you can tell, they have to be pretty chill to handle it like this. And they did. They all did remarkably well."

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The Sochi dogs were vaccinated in Russia, but still have to undergo medical evaluations here, a process that should take about two weeks. Until then, they're staying at the facilities of the Washington Animal Rescue League. Bob Ramin, CEO of the league, said "In the next couple of days, we'll start socializing them, taking them out on walks with other dogs, and really just treating them like other dogs so they can have that socialization and feel safe."

In a way, bringing the dogs from Sochi sounds a little bit like coals to Newcastle: American shelters are already filled with dogs who desperately need to be rehomed, and many of them never will be. And there are Russians who have gone to extraordinary lengths to save the dogs in their own country. But still, we have to congratulate the HSI on its efforts. We wish these dogs good luck in their new homes.

Via CNN

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Redneck Dentist: East Texas tooth pulling

A friend of mine had a bad toothache, and wanted to drive 2 hrs into Dallas to get his tooth pulled. I told him I had pliers and some Jack Daniels and could …
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Lean On, Over, and Around

March is Women’s History Month, if you didn’t know. I work in a strange profession, one that has changed quite solidly in demographics from its original incarnation to its current status, graduating classes of row after row of- well, men, mostly- now replaced, to an 80% extent, by women. I spend a lot of time talking about veterinary medicine, and I would say about 80% of the time I am talking about it with women (who’d have guessed?)

Does the changing demographic matter? Yes and no. I may be a little prejudiced here myself, but I think women are pretty badass and are doing a bangup job in veterinary medicine. Like their male counterparts, they’re practice owners, associates, specialists, leaders, and, you know, individual people with their own strengths and weaknesses.

Whenever I mention the idea of exploring that concept and what it had meant for the field, editors all run screaming. You can’t, they say. It’s too controversial. There have been some attempts, like this one from Dr. Don Smith at Cornell, but the conversation is by and large stagnant. Fortunately for me, I have no major sponsors to frighten here in my own little corner of the net, so let’s just go ahead and go there, shall we? It’s not like no one is talking about it, just not out loud.

tim

So we’ve all heard of Lean In, right? Sheryl Sandberg’s go get ‘em tome extolling women to jump on in and take the bull by the horns? Yes, that was very nice, and excellent advice for a particular target group who want to be Sheryl Sandbergs. All you gunners out there- you know who you are- read and take note. And for the rest of us, who maybe want a break from running at full throttle at career advancement for a little while in order to live life?

sheryl-sandberg-time-magazine-cover-2

Who said I hated her? I just have a different definition of success. Stop making us snipe at each other for goodness’ sake.

I’m here to tell you that it’ll be OK. And guess what I’m going to do? I’m going to use math, because I’m a woman who loves math AS WELL AS SHOES, and I also think more women should be saying out loud that you can like both. I write my own rules. You, by the way, should as well.

1. Logistical Growth Curve: Up, Up and Away

Let’s start with the typical career trajectory, as defined by the Sandbergs of the world, like a logistical growth curve:

logisticExcept instead of population growth, imagine perhaps income, or accolades, or whatever you want. Point is, you start slow, gain some momentum, then go out on top- ever moving upwards.

And in all the talk about women in the workplace, the one elephant in the room is always this: women sometimes choose to have babies. As do men, albeit in a less direct manner. And women sometimes want to take some time to stay home with their children. (Men do too, yes, but when we’re looking at a general trend here, I’m stretching to think of a single male veterinarian who left the field to be a stay at home dad.)

And in honor of Women’s History month, I am going to commit to words the experience I had, that my friends and I have all spoken about in hushed tones and felt we couldn’t discuss out loud because controversy and all. This was my experience. YMMV.

From the moment I set foot on campus, motherhood was presented in a subtle but unmistakable light as an either/or phenomenon when it came to veterinary medicine. Either you went all in or you went home. Women who took a year off to have a baby got eyebrow raises and sighs of “too bad she took the spot from someone who really wanted it,” as if pregnancy opened up a small but permanent hole in one’s brain through which all your knowledge dripped out, bit by bit, until all you were capable of is popping pacifiers in mouths and talking about Robeez. If you really wanted to be a vet, you would have not chosen to have a kid- especially in school.

This doesn’t end outside of school. I’ve been asked in interviews if I was pregnant (thanks for that, carb bloat I guess?) or planning to become pregnant, which is as illegal as you are thinking it is. I’m glad the guy asked it though, so that I knew where he stood on the topic. I’ve sat in meetings, 7 months pregnant and bloated from 12 hour emergency shifts, while the medical director’s best piece of advice to the interns was, “motherhood and medicine don’t mix. Mothers are terrible vets.” I’ve heard of a person who fired their veterinarian for having two maternity leaves, because she is ‘clearly not committed,’ because she wouldn’t give him her cell phone number while she was out on leave. The nerve.

tumblr_m4myx9MTNk1r09xl9o1_500

So what’s the message here to women who want to have a family? If you want to be a good vet, you come back to work two weeks later and find a good nanny. By the way, I completely support any woman who wants to do this. The key word here, though, is “want.” What about the women who don’t want to do that? Get out. You don’t deserve to be here.

2. Extinction Curve: Down and Out

I’ll ask for a raise of hands- and I’ll be the first to put mine up: who has been told in an interview “I don’t like hiring young women because they always have babies,” as if all women inevitably do this, and those that do should be ashamed of their lack of commitment. Slacker.

Cue the sad trombone. You, my female friends, are now an extinction curve. Even the possibility that you might one day want to do something so egregious as reproduce is enough to keep you from getting hired in some places. I can see how that might make the women who choose not to have kids potentially a little irritated with the women who do. This is really, really counterproductive. But it happens.

logistic success

The weight of a family is going to drag you right on out of there.

Being the troopers that they are, I’ve seen some amazing women fight tooth and nail to hold on to their professional commitments full bore despite the fact that it wasn’t exactly what they wanted to be doing at the moment, thinking that was their only option. Then they quit, never to be heard from again. They have been told that you are 100% in or you are a failure, and so they left.

And boy is that a shame. Wanting a personal life- whether that means kids, a hobby, a passion outside the field- is not only all right, it’s pretty darn important when it comes to retaining one’s sanity. I’m a big fan of that.

There is a reason we have one of the highest suicide and depression rates among professionals, and part of it is our own doing by having such distaste for those who strive to live a life outside the office. Martyr complexes only get you so far, and it’s become ingrained as part of the definition of what veterinarians do. I promise you this: I am so, so much better at what I do now than I was when I was stressed, overtaxed, and resentful. I am grateful once again to be a veterinarian.

3. Steady State: Fluctuating around a stable baseline

Now: let’s review what really happens out there in the world (no one will tell me my population biology course was a waste of time! Viva la diff eq!) Real life, messy, biological populations that are stable (though not necessarily stationary) enter what’s known as steady state, sometimes up, sometimes down, but maintaining height:

steady state

 

Who doesn’t want stability? Life- and the average vet- is tougher than we give it/her credit for. If populations can bounce back from plagues and droughts surely we can manage to have a kid, or vacation, or a marriage or divorce or whatever distraction that comes with being human without having to panic and toss away an entire career.

When I went back into general practice after two years of emergency medicine punctuated by two pregnancies, I hadn’t done a routine spay in a year and a half. I was freaking out. I was convinced it was as if I possessed virgin hands and somehow I would mess the entire thing up. I stood over the patient, my boss in the next room in case of mass emergency, and guess what? I did it as if I had been doing it just the day before. Muscle memory is an amazing thing, don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

You tune out to take care of things and come back better than ever. This is how leaders are born. By cutting out a huge percentage of our field from believing they have what it takes to succeed long term because they want a breather, we’re killing off our future leadership.

When the increasing numbers of women in the human medical field pushed this same sort of reckoning, asking for flexibility and balance, the end result was happier doctors and both women and men who benefitted from it. Maybe you don’t want kids, maybe you want time to pursue hiking the Appalachian trail or to take care of an aging parent or further dominate your field. You deserve that too. The old timers tut-tutting the up and comers when I was in school a decade ago may still be hand wringing and bemoaning the fact that the new generation doesn’t want to work 80 hours with one day of vacation a year, and guess what? They’re right. Nothing wrong with that. Not everyone can or needs to be a Sandberg.

What made sense back then may no longer hold true.

What made sense back then may no longer hold true.

Redefining Success

When I was in school, one of my best friends was a woman named Carrie. She is awesome. Like me, we both decided halfway through that we weren’t all that interested in being small animal veterinary practice owners, and by junior year our colleagues were taking bets on who was going to leave the profession first.

We both did, in our own way. But we did it on our own terms, and we both came back, which is more than I can say for some of my really amazing classmates who opted out under the weight of unrealistic expectations. I am a writer, and now, in a strange twist I never anticipated, I’m exploring a new subcategory of medicine in hospice care. Dr. Carrie is- get this- travelling to the world’s hotspots as a public health consultant. She just got back from Peru, Indonesia and Thailand. THAT IS SO COOL.

Obviously trying to cover gender issues in one post is like trying to sum up War and Peace in a paragraph, but someone needs to start the conversation. Success in the veterinary profession the way we define it now stacks the deck against a whole lot of people. So let’s redefine what it means to be a successful veterinarian. Find a steady state. Your steady state.

To all you new grads and my old friends who are all emailing me saying they think they are ready to leave the field, I have this to say: leave if you need to. It’s OK. You can come back, you can. And if you don’t want to that’s ok too. If you want to single mindedly pursue dermatologic domination at an academic institution, you can do that too. This is a really, really cool field, and you are allowed to make your own path through it. You will always be a veterinarian no matter how you occupy your day, and don’t let anyone who chose a different path tell you otherwise.

14K feet up in Africa. Wouldn't have happened without my DVM.

14K feet up in Africa. Wouldn’t have happened without my DVM.

Stay. We need guides on all the paths up the hill.

Pawcurious: With Pet Lifestyle Expert and Veterinarian Dr. V.

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HEALTHY WEIGHT CHALLENGE—WEEK 6 RESULTS ARE IN—DON’T LET EXERCISE SABOTAGE YOUR DOG’S DIET!

FritzBefore2In week 4, Fritz experienced a small weight gain. With a minor adjustment in his food and calorie intake, he is right back on track with a ½ pound weight loss and he weighed-in at 46.1 pounds this week.

The last 2 weeks brought an interesting question from Fritz’s owner. The family took a vacation and Fritz was to stay at overnight camp. While Fritz is a camper, apparently he spends his days running around like a madman with the other dogs in residence! Fritz’s owner was sure he would burn extra calories and be extra hungry during his camp experience. She inquired if we should increase his calories to compensate for this extra activity.

While this seems fairly logical, unfortunately it is thinking that often leads to continued weight gain—despite a diet and exercise program. This diet disaster phenomenon in both canine and human weight loss is called the “Reward Rule”. People unknowingly sabotage weight loss by giving extra calories when they feel they or their pet have earned a reward. For example, if Fido had an extra long walk or played vigorously in the park with another dog, an extra food reward is often given. People generally over-estimate the number of calories burned during exercise and tend to under-estimate the calorie punch of a treat.

Weekly Weight Loss Tip: If your dog is on a diet and is exercising but failing to lose weight—check yourself—are you practicing the “Reward Rule”? Don’t let exercise undo your weight loss progress! If your pet had a particularly vigorous exercise session (or stays at dog overnight camp!) just be happy that it may add to the weight loss efforts. Don’t get into the vicious cycle of extra treats for harder workout sessions!

Fritz is the first participant enrolled in the Halo Healthy Weight Challenge on THE EXPERT VET of the RADIO PET LADY NETWORK. Fritz is eating Halo’s Healthy Weight Turkey & Duck Recipe and canned Spot’s Stew Wholesome Chicken as his main diet.

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Nice Denta photos

A few nice denta images I found:

traliccio
denta

Image by thewhitestdogalive
me@Diano Park
photo by Denta

sunset jump
denta

Image by thewhitestdogalive
me@Diano Park
photo by Denta

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Silent witness

There’s a reception in the village square of Gorbio following a baptism at the church. Guests gather outside the restaurant for an aperitif.  Meanwhile, one of the village dogs sits quietly by the fountain.
RIVIERA DOGS

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can you tell me who sang that song, or what the na…

can you tell me who sang that song, or what the name of it is?
stella rose
BAD RAP Blog

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