The Grottaglie Dog

This dog was lolling around outside a bar in the Italian village of Grottaglie in Puglia.  It’s a village famous for its ceramics and when I was lucky enough recently to participate in Carla Coulson’s fabulous Caravan Travel Photography Workshop, this is one of the villages we visited. We photographed inside 4 different ceramics factories that day – of course they are all very small – a fascinating day – as were all the days on Carla’s workshop.

This dog is probably old and perhaps not very well. Perhaps a stray who hangs around outside this bar.

RIVIERA DOGS

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Latest Greenies Joint Care News

Nurturing talents from the ground up
Radical greenies, meanwhile, launch fierce campaigns against the cutting down of existing trees. For 68-year-old tree surgeon … "Instead of planting more trees, I place emphasis on creating more people who know how to take care of trees," said
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25 years of Landcare
They successfully submitted funding for a joint project to run courses on Property Management Planning (PMP) for a total of 130 farmers. “When the South Australian Department of Agriculture developed a … “Ian fostered interest among a group of about
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Victoria Stilwell Unleashes Arson Dogs Web Series

In the Animal Planet series It’s Me or the Dog Victoria Stilwell deduces the reasons for a rover’s unruly behavior, but in her just unleashed web series Arson Dogs the queen of canine…



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DogTipper

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Feeding Your Golden Retriever


All Golden Retriever puppies will nurture from their mother until Add Imagethey reach the age of seven weeks. Once they reach the age of three weeks, they should be fed with puppy food, which you should soak and mix into a warm grubby compound. This way, it resembles the food they get from their mother, and they will learn quickly how their food tastes and how they should eat it.

Once you bring your puppy home, you should always make sure that you use the same food that he has become accustomed to. The breeder will start training the puppy with food, and it’s up to you to ensure that he gets the food he has come to know. Golden Retriever puppies have very delicate stomachs, and they can be very receptive to any changes in their food.

When you first bring your new Golden Retriever puppy home, he or she may not be too interested in eating for the first few days. Being in a new home can be stressful for the puppy, which is why you shouldn’t force him to eat. The puppy will also realize that he doesn’t have competition at the food bowl, because he is away from his litter. You shouldn’t worry if he doesn’t immediately eat, as it will take him some time.

Once your puppy has slept through the night, you should take him outside and let him relieve himself, then bring him in and give him some food. You should also plan feedings throughout the day, such as the morning, middle of the day, then at night. Once you have planned feedings, you should make sure that you stick to this plan so that your puppy will get used to it.

Keep in mind that the last feeding of the day doesn’t necessarily need to be set in stone. You should always aim to feed your puppy at least a half an hour before you head to bed, so that you can take him outside after eating. If you time it just right every night, you can feed your Golden, take him out to use the bathroom, and still have plenty of time to get ready for bed. At night, when you sleep, you should have puppy pads or newspapers in an area that your Golden is familiar with so he can use the bathroom if he can’t get you to take him out.

First the first few weeks, your Golden will eat a little bit of the food. Once he has reached 8 weeks of age, he should be on dry food with a little bit of warm water added to it. The best way to feed is to keep adding a little bit of warm water to the food, and let the pup eat until he is finished. If you continue to do this throughout feedings, your Golden will begin to eat all of his portion.

Keep in mind that you should never rush him, or change anything about the way he feeds. Golden Retrievers will eat their share, although it will take them a bit of time to develop the proper eating habits. As the puppy gets older, his stomach will grow and he will begin to eat more. During this time, you won’t need to add any water to his food. Golden Retrievers are a truly unique breed, a breed that loves to be fed – and craves attention. If you stick to your plan when your puppy is little – he will be a healthy eater as he gets older.
Welcome to The Top Dog Blog!

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Feds approve oil exploration off US Eastern Coast

Feds approve oil exploration off US Eastern Coast
If this had been a Republican administration the progressive greenies would be screaming their heads off about the… (July 18, 2014) MORE … The Obama administration has sided with energy developers over environmentalists, approving the use of
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It's time for Tony Abbott to dump secret nuclear ambitions
If you mean using sea water and then collecting waste water then there are other issues including a build up of salt, the possibility of contamination, the massive kills of fish in intake water (a single plant in the US was shown to cause around 3.5
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Jul 19, the raw food diet I am using for my huskies………

3 years ago I finally put it together that one of my dogs has an allergy to kibble ingredients. I was feeding the best kibble I could find; Wellness and
Dog Food Blog | Best Dog Food Guide

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Does Complete and Balanced Pet Food Guarantee Good Health?

When a bag, can, or other container of pet food says complete and balanced, what does that mean?

 It simply means that the mix of ingredients in the pet food has enough of the nutrients needed in the diet to prevent most diseases due to deficiencies of proteins, fats, minerals, and vitamins. Diets are tested to ensure they have the right amount of chemical nutrients and minerals, but the lack of moisture and healthy oils or addition of allergens and too many calories can cause chronic medical problems When pets are fed the recommended amounts, many will become obese. Others may develop ear infections, skin infections, and diarrhea from allergenic ingredients in the food. Pet foods may make your dog get fat, or itch, shake, and develop the runs. There’s no way to guarantee a pet food is good for all pets. That’s the lesson I learned. I share this information with all my clients and try to spread the word through my blogs and books.

 Most dogs and cats seem to thrive on commercial pet food. However, individual dogs and cats may need a different type of diet to stay healthy, prevent disease, or treat medical issues.Some dogs or cats may need more oils for a dry coat, less carbohydrates to lose weight, a different meat or gluten-free diet for allergies (skin, ear, or bowel issues), more moisture (canned, homemade or raw) for the prevention or treatment of urinary crystals or stones, or holistic, homemade, or raw pet food for severe allergies, bowel issues or seizures. Most commercial dry food is geared for the average pet without health issues. These mixes of ingredients may not be healthy for a pet with allergies to wheat, obese pets, or those with urinary problems. Even raw food aficionados forget that not all dogs do well on a raw diet if they are fed a raw diet with beef or chicken, and the pet is allergic to a certain meat. The type of meat, the presence of grain or glutens, the amount of oils, and the percentage of moisture all can affect the health of your pet.

Where do you turn for advice? Can you ask your vet? Most veterinarians are trained to advise a different prescription diet for each medical issue. These diets may work, but may not be readily eaten by some pets. Some of the dry medical diets aren’t really much better for the pet’s health than most commercial foods. One urinary diet may help with crystals, but has wheat in it, that may cause skin problems. Prescription diets may be too expensive for some people and the pet suffers because they are offered no alternatives.

What are you supposed to do? Can you ask your vet about other types of diets that may work? How about homemade or a raw diet? Feeding canned food versus a kibble diet for weight loss? Feeding raw, meaty, bones to keep teeth clean? Most vets won’t know practical nutritional advice, because we were not trained to give it. Millions of pets are thriving on different diets, but most veterinarians are only trained to give advice on commercially “complete and balanced” diets and their prescription diets. Don’t blame your vet for not giving you alternatives like a homemade or raw diet or even simply supplementing your pet’s diet with healthy “human food”. We just weren’t trained to do that.

10 years ago, I started questioning the way we feed our pets. I had to reeducate myself and learn nutritional principles. I read 100’s of nutritional articles and labels on commercial food and raw food. I read books on feeding raw food and home cooking, as well as many books on human nutrition. As a result, I started advising my clients to feed different ingredients depending on their pets needs. For example, many purebred dogs and some cats need to avoid wheat-filled treats and food. Avoiding glutens in sensitive pets may cure ear problems, skin problems, bowel issues, and even seizures. With the success of nutritional counseling, I saw that different types of ingredients and moister food (canned, homemade, or raw), helped with weight problems or helped control medical problems like preventing urinary crystals from forming in both dogs and cats. I came to realize that our pets are individuals, and that each may need more than the common commercial kibble for optimum health. Some pets may need different ingredients in the dry food. Other pets may need to eat moister canned food, raw food, or home cooked food to be healthier, leaner, or to help with medical problems.

After my research and success, I wrote Dog Dish Diet: Sensible Nutrition for Your Dog’s Health in 2009. I updated a couple sections and published the second edition in 2011. Many clients wanted more slow cooking recipes that were in the book, so I published an eBook. Feed Your Pet to Avoid the Vet with slow cooking recipes and nutritional advice for both dogs and cats. There isn’t a day that goes by when a client or reader tells or emails me that they changed the type of food or the ingredients in the diet to help with a medical problem. I am so happy to know that I have truly helped pet owners become part of the health care team to treat or prevent chronic medical problems.

I’m convinced that the right mix of ingredients may often prevent most problems or the need for medication. If you want to treat or prevent medical problems in your pet, check out my blogs, you tube videos (http://youtube.com/drgregdvm), and my books, Dog Dish Diet and Feed Your Pet to Avoid the Vet .

The post Does Complete and Balanced Pet Food Guarantee Good Health? appeared first on Dr. Greg's Dog Dish Diet.

Dr. Greg’s Dog Dish Diet

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mr peanut gets his after bath treat

mr peanut has his feline greenies treat after he gets his weekly bath.

McDreamy the seal point mitted Ragdoll cat tried four new treats and only likes one…he tried Greenies (Digestive Health), Natural Balance (Salmon), Natures…
Video Rating: 5 / 5

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Lunch Time Fun

Jack and I had a little impromptu photo session at lunch today.

Crazy Coulee and Little Lacey

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Ebola, the real bogeyman, and you

Ever since I was 15, my sister and I have used “Ebola” as a short form derivative of every bad bug we’ve ever gotten. “Oh god, I’ve been laid up all day with Ebola,” “that taco from last night gave me Ebola,” etc, etc. We were able to say it with such offhand tone because we knew that really, Ebola wasn’t exactly a threat here in Southern California. It was simply shorthand for “really sick.”

After reading “The Hot Zone” I stopped saying the word at all. Faced with the visceral reality of what hemorrhaging out of every orifice is really like and the panic it engenders in local communities, it didn’t seem so funny a hyperbole. That stuff is scary. You should read the book if you haven’t, which will not only make you start washing your hands a little more, it will also help you appreciate the new role veterinarians are facing as the front line against emerging zoonotic diseases.

fotos-virus-ebola

 

Ebola is scary, very scary, don’t get me wrong. But we’re probably not about to be thrust into the middle of the next Zombie Apocalypse, which is what many people are expecting if my Facebook feed is any indication. If you’re in the mood to freak out, be my guest, but let me give you a better thing to be worrying about. The number of people losing their marbles over two US citizens being flown in within a self contained bubble is pretty silly when you look at all the other scary things facing us every day that, while less camera-ready than a guy in a space suit stumbling into Emory, are much more likely to truly mess up your day.

Remember: A person with a known diagnosis, held inside a containment unit, isn’t the problem here.

The guy coughing on the plane home from Heathrow who feels like garbage but doesn’t want to miss his daughter’s birthday party? That’s going to be the problem. The traveller who takes 4 Advil before hitting the thermal imaging cameras at the Shanghai airport to fool the system into thinking she doesn’t have a fever? Or the person who doesn’t even realize they’re sick until after he or she gets home? There’s the problem, at least so far as Ebola is concerned.

But Ebola isn’t the problem I’m so worried about, not really. As awful as Ebola is, there’s a much bigger tsunami lurking in the background and it’s already here.

pills

When the associate director of the CDC tells us, “We’re in the post antibiotic era,” THAT makes me panic. And it’s already happening.

The Real Losing Battle

We forget how recently antibiotics have developed in the annals of medical history- Alexander Fleming’s famous penicillin discovery only happened in 1928, less than a century ago. Before that, we were routinely felled by scrapes, coughs, childbirth, urinary tract infections. We’ve done a good job keeping apace of bacteria’s insanely effective evolution to defeat the antibiotic’s mechanisms of action, but we’re finally losing the battle.

It’s the result of a multitude of causalities: a slowdown in new drug development and approval. Misuse of antibiotics in both human and veterinary medicine. The ability for antibiotics to be used over the counter in food production facilities. The latter is now being removed thanks to the FDA’s Guidance 213- taking antibiotics back behind the prescription pad, where they belong.

resistance

But it may be too little too late. The last line of defense in treating drug resistant infections, carbapenem, is now itself encountering resistant bugs. THIS scares me. It should scare you too, more than Ebola, even if Ebola makes people bleed out of their eyeballs. Bacterial infections can be gruesome too, CNN. Is that what it’s going to take?

In the meantime, I do not want to get a fever. Because if I get a fever someone is going to think I have Ebola thanks to the current media frenzy and then I’ll have to go to a hospital, where the real enemy is waiting to kill me. I’m avoiding hospitals like the plague (which is another disease that responds to antibiotics and might not in the future.) DANGIT, we just can’t win, can we?

Pawcurious: With Pet Lifestyle Expert and Veterinarian Dr. V.

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