Pet Food Recall – Nature’s Variety

The Beacon Journal reported today that Nature’s Variety Pet Food has issued a recall for certain varieties of dog and cat food because of possible Salmonella contamination.

Affected Products:

Chicken Medallions – 3 Lb Package – Use by date: 11/10/10
Chicken Patties – 6 Lb Package – Use by date: 11/10/10
Chicken Chubs – 2 Lb Package – Use by date: 11/10/10

Details of the Recall:

“The Nebraska company issued the voluntary recall Thursday of its Chicken Formula Raw Frozen Diet for dogs and cats with a ”Best If Used By ” date of 11/10/10.

Included in the recall are 3 pound packages of chicken medallions (UPC# 7 69949 60130 2); 6 pound packages of chicken patties (UPC# 7 69949 60120 3); and 2 pound packages of chicken chubs (UPC# 7 69949 60121 0.

No human or pet illnesses have been reported in connection with the products, the company said on its Web site.

Consumers who have purchased the products should return the unopened product to the retailer for a full refund or replacement.

If the package has been opened, the company advises consumers to dispose of the raw food in a safe manner and bring the receipt or empty package in a sealed bag to the retailer for refund or replacement.

Consumers can also contact the company’s Customer Care line at 800-374-3142 for more information.”

Source Article: Beacon Journal

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Caring for Your Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier Pet Dog

The soft coated wheaten terrier would be considered by most people to be “high maintenance”. This means that a lot of care should be given to it in order to maintain its stature. This statement also means that a lot of steps should be taken in order to care for the dog properly. So how do you care for your soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog?

Let us first talk about the coat. This is one of the most distinguishing characteristics of a soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog. In fact, when you take a look at the name, you will realize that the coat gives the dog its identity. Taking care of this essential part of the soft coated wheaten terrier dog can be quite a daunting task. This is especially true if you have just found out about the various standards that people use to judge the beauty of a soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog.

Frequent grooming is required to keep the coat shiny and to prevent matting. It also helps get rid of any accumulated dirt. You should comb or brush your soft coated wheaten terrier dog everyday to make sure that his coat remains silky and tangle-free. The coat also needs to be trimmed once in a while to preserve the “terrier look” and to allow a new coat to grow.

Besides the coat, you should also take care of the nails and teeth of your soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog. In case that you do not know what to do by yourself, you might want to hire some professional dog grooming services to do the job for you.

Another aspect you should concentrate on is the training. Remember to train your soft coated wheaten terrier dog as early as possible in order to ingrain in him the basics of proper behavior. There are several keywords that should come to your mind when training your soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog:

1) Consistency – be consistent with your teaching. Do not use different commands in order to get the same response as this will only serve to confuse your soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog. You should also be consistent in terms of reward and punishment. This will help your dog understand what you want to happen.

2) Tone – a soft coated wheaten terrier dog is actually pretty sensitive to the tones in the human voice. This means that the dog will be able to tell if you are feeling upset or if you are feeling impatient. You need to learn how to moderate your tone in order to avoid confusion with your soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog.

3) Timing –learn the proper timing of when to correct your soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog. The element you need during correction is surprise. You need to correct the soft coated wheaten terrier for a mistake right after or even before it performs the act. This way, you will be able to instill a sense of consequence into your soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog.

Caring and training for your soft coated wheaten terrier can be quite a bit of work. You will also have to contend with the energy inherent in every terrier breed. However, with patience, your efforts will be rewarded.
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Love Your Smile with Dr. Sujata Bhatia

Love Your Smile with Dr. Sujata Bhatia
Straight teeth allow for proper oral hygiene by providing easier access to the areas around the gums and help reduce the accumulation of tartar and plaque on the teeth, thereby reducing the total bacterial count in the mouth. It is estimated that about
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Cherubini: Lodoïska – review
We are in Poland, where the hero Floreski, together with his loquacious servant Varbel, and a Tartar army under its gentlemanly leader, Titzikan, sets out to rescue Floreski's lover, Lodoïska, held captive by the tyrant Dourlinski. The text insists we
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Sunday Sheepies

We are home and all is well. These last few days were very trying on all of us but I don’t want to think about them at the moment.  I will be writing the clinic in a few weeks once I’m totally calmed down about their utter lack of communication from the price, to the operation performed, to just general updates throughout the day, but frankly I don’t want to think about that at the moment.  I’d rather think about the fun we had on the weekend instead.

After a quick nap after our morning walk with Jetta, Cricket and Deirdre we headed out to a farm that Amanda is checking in on every few days for a few months.  It isn’t just any farm, it’s a sheep farm!  Lacey got to have some fun in the round pen with a couple of the woolie ones.

Amanda took the pictures – thanks Amanda!  I also have video but I haven’t downloaded it yet so that will have to wait until later.

Every good working dog worth their salt, warms up by stretching and making sure they are one with the sheep poop.

Brit was sorting the sheep so we could get some good ones. These lucky ones got to go back to the field.

The experts Brit and Leo.

Here we go.

Sassy from the start.

Hey Amanda!  Are you getting this?  Look at them running over there.  :)

When they weren’t moving there was a lot of this…

Which became this if they refused to move.  :)

Going in for a nibble.  :)

Her nemesis.  You can see him staring at her in most of the photos.  He wasn’t impressed with the little pipsqueak.

The “Wheeeeee” moments.

The final stand off.

She had lots of fun and had much more confidence than I thought she would.  Thanks again Amanda for letting us come out and pretend to herd and for taking all the great photos.  :)

After herding, we went to the beach!  Ummm…. Lacey was exhausted and kind of overwhelmed with the craziness so she just stood around after cooling off in the water, so there won’t be many photos of her, but there will be lots of her friends.  Stay tuned.  :)
Crazy Coulee and Little Lacey

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Be Kind to Animal People Week

May 5-11 is the American Humane Association’s Be Kind to Animals Week.

be-kind-animals-week

Hopefully, we’re kind to animals every week, but it’s good to have a reminder every now and then, and maybe a reason to go out of your way to do that thing you’ve been putting off. In last year’s post I listed 5 ways to go about this, such as the shelter drive-by (still love this idea! I’m due for another trip!)

But for today’s post, I would like to discuss something that’s been nagging at the back of my brain for a long time. It has to do with some pretty strong divides in the animal community.

On one side, the rescue community.

On the other, the breeder/fancy community.

The blame game can and does get nasty, sometimes. And that breaks my heart.

I’ve seen many posts- some from very well placed people in the dog community- arguing that until all dogs find homes, no dog should be allowed to breed. I disagree. It’s gotten so bad that many people I know are scared to admit on their blogs that they purchased their dog from a respected breeder because they don’t want to have people tell them how they’ve just killed a shelter dog.

I’ve also seen posts from some in the breeder community insinuating that the animal rescue community = animal rights activists who want to eventually eliminate all pet ownership. Ingrid Newkirk does not get to define what animal welfare means. Most animal rescue people I know are a lot like breeders I know- their lives revolve around the animals they love.

Why do we allow ourselves to be defined by the extremes? I think the vast majority of people fall somewhere squarely in the middle of these extremes, with many crossing over; people who have both rescues and purchased purebreds. There are good reasons for both and very different aims.

With rare exceptions, we want the same thing: finding pets a lifelong home with the right family who values them.

It’s unfortunate that the game-changing people doing innovative work in the no-kill movement are so often dismissed as people with their heads in the clouds by those who confuse the animal welfare movement with animal rights.

It’s also unfortunate that the people who work tirelessly to keep their breed healthy, who grill potential owners up one side and down the other to make sure this is the right home, take the blame for all the irresponsible backyard breeders and for-profit puppy mills as the cause of so many ills by those who refuse to differentiate the many ways one might purchase a pet.

We have so much to learn from each other based on our own experiences. Being open minded has put me at a table with AKC leadership at a dog show one day, and sitting with Mike Arms the next learning about the way effective marketing saves lives.

So this is what I ask of you this week, because it really will improve the lives of animals: Be Kind to Animal Lovers, no matter what kind of animal lover they are. I know you will probably never agree on whether someone is a pet parent or a pet owner. I get it. As a vet, I see posts from both groups complaining about how clueless we are. But even if you don’t agree on some things or most things, you may gain a new perspective.

When it comes to making animals’ lives better, we are all in this together.

I’d love for the comment section to be your list of people with a strong voice that you admire. Hopefully I can find some new people to learn from. :)

Pawcurious: With Pet Lifestyle Expert and Veterinarian Dr. V.

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Pet Health Essentials: Keeping your animal friends disease-free and healthy

Pet Health Essentials: Keeping your animal friends disease-free and healthy
And having healthy pets doesn't just stop at watching for bugs. Susan Danchanko, who owns Pet Zone Inn in Southmont, said dental care for dogs is key. “You should always try to brush your dog's teeth on a regular basis, because poor dental health can
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Neighbor stopped attack by family pet, but mauling proved fatal for woman
The man stopped to help, and the German shepherd attacked again, its teeth finding the woman's neck. Rachael Honabarger, 35, would From 2000 to 2010, the Ohio Department of Health reports, 11 people succumbed to dog bites. The most-dangerous
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How to check for cancer in your pet
But when teeth look healthy and the gums are puffy, it may signal another underlying health issue. Paws: Cracked pads typically result from irritants, diet or rough terrain, and are not necessarily indicators of a more serious problem. However, the pet
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Ay, Chihuahua! A Service Dog Is Kicked Out of Taco Bell

Granted, people get kicked out of fast food restaurants all the time. In some locations, it happens every day, maybe every hour. But nobody should be kicking out a guy with a service dog. 

That bit of nastiness happened this week at a Taco Bell in Jessup, MD, when a man and his dog were asked to please get the hell out, pronto.

Steve Kleckner is a truck driver who has trouble hearing. He has worn hearing aids since he was 11. He has traveled with Snickers, a German Shepherd/Akita mix, since 2000. Snickers helps Steve hear. She’s 13 years old, but she’s still in the game.

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“Her sense of hearing is so unbelievably sharp,” Kleckner told ABC News. “When the alarm clock goes off, she wakes me up.”

She also alerts Kleckner when strangers approach the trucks, and other things like that. Snickers wears an orange cape, emblazoned with the words "Hearing Dog," which ought to put any suspicions to rest.

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That wasn't good enough for a manager of Taco Bell.

Kleckner told ABC News, “A manager came over to me and said, ‘I'm going to call the police, you're not supposed to have a dog in here.'"

Kleckner stood his ground: “I said to her, go for it, she's a service dog. It's protected under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.”

Kleckner was steamed. He called the cops himself, just to get the manager off his back. The cops, however, did the unexpected. They showed up -- and showed Kleckner the door. They kicked him out. One even followed him back to his truck, where he was waiting for his next load to haul.

“I'm frustrated right now with the police," Kleckner said. "They knew this, and they said we're here to uphold the law."

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ABC News contacted the Howard County Police Department, who confirmed that the incident took place. The police spokesmen played off the reaction of the police, saying that they may not have been able to see proof that the dog was a service dog. 

Snickers, of course, was wearing his orange jacket. Maybe the police need a seeing eye dog?

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As for Taco Bell, it's making amends. A district manager apologized to Kleckner. However, Taco Bell also released a statement saying that other customers had asked that Kleckner be thrown out, and that he had been there more than two hours. 

Kleckner says that he'd been there less than an hour.

Via ABC News


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Eagle Trains Citizens For Airborne Dude Alert

True American Dog

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Denta (居酒屋 – Izakaya or pub, bar, tavern)

Check out these denta images:

Denta (居酒屋 – Izakaya or pub, bar, tavern)
denta

Image by iMorpheus
They live above their newly established bar.

Kreuzweg auf denTa’Ghammar
denta

Image by boris_gass
An diesem Kreuzweg sind alle Stationen aus dem Leben Christi in Form von Skulpturen aufgestellt.

Es ist ein Internationales Wallfahrts-Ort.

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It’s not what it looks like

Someone said this to me the other day: “You have such a glamorous life.”

And I laughed, because I assumed it was sarcasm, but she said it with such sincerity that I paused and said, “Really?”

And she said, “Oh, you know, maybe exciting is a better word- all the travel and….well, the trips and stuff you talk about.” She paused, tilted her head to the side, and realized she was talking to a person holding a grocery bag full of mops and Zero Odor. I was, in fact, on a trip as we spoke. To the grocery store. Which has been the  extent of things lately, as tends to happen sometimes.

It was ironic to me that the person chose this day of all days to make that statement, because this is perhaps the least glamorous day I have had in some time. Apollo has been engaging in some marking behavior the last few months, and if there is one thing that turns my normally mild-mannered spouse into the Hulk, it’s the acrid stench of cat urine in the entryway of the house. Can’t say I blame him. So here we go again, off on a cleaning spree and figuring out what has so disturbed Apollo’s little kitty-brain that he sees no other option than to back on up to the nearest wall and let loose.

The offending area was easy to spot, a Niagara of urine splattered on the wood of the front door, pooling underneath and soaking into the grout and the tile. A lovely way to greet new neighbors, by the way.

I mopped it, dizzy with the fumes.

I mopped it once, I mopped it twice, and still not smelling very nice, I went ahead and mopped it thrice. Even then, it was no dice. My feelings then were not so nice.                                    -Dr. ScrewLoose

After about 18 rounds of attempting to clean the area, including liberal doses of Anti Icky Poo, I could still smell it. I wondered if perhaps there was another area I was missing. I got out the blacklight and investigated the entryway, but if you are anything like me I have no luck with that unless it’s already pitch black in the house, and who wants to clean at midnight? So I went old school, sticking my nose to the ground and trying to ascertain if there was an errant area I was missing in my cleaning attempts by olfactory input.

Did I mention I have a glass door that looks right into our entryway that you pass on the way to the front door? It’s pretty private, which means you have to be in the middle of walking up to the door to see anything, which means of course that any time I’m doing something I’d rather not have witnessed, someone invariably shows up.

There I was on all fours, nose pressed to the ground sniffing like Scooby Doo looking for a Scooby snack with Brody dutifully trailing behind, when I heard a polite cough from the region of the front door. This seems as good a time as any to mention I had just gotten back from a run and didn’t see the point of showering before cleaning up cat pee, so I was in stinky gym clothes and my hair pulled back in a sweaty ponytail while I crawled around smelling my floor. I pushed up to my hands to see the UPS man trying hard to look anywhere but inside the door, well aware that I was probably going to be “sight of the day” at the UPS locker room this evening.

I took the box and shut the door. Sometimes explaining “It’s not what it looks like. I was just sniffing for cat pee” is not the correct answer.

crazy-cat-lady

So there you have it. The glamorous life of a veterinary writer looks a lot like the life of any person with a grumpy cat, bad timing excepted.

If there are any small favors in life to be thankful for, it’s that I was discovered by the UPS man and not, say, the neighbor kids who already have one story too many to share about the weird lady on the corner.

Pawcurious: With Pet Lifestyle Expert and Veterinarian Dr. V.

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